Lior Ben-Hur Interview

Time to send some new music your way, Murfie friends! Lior Ben-Hur is a reggae musician currently residing in the city of San Francisco, California. His band goes by the same name. Lior is from Jerusalem originally, and has seen a lot of different countries—which is why his reggae tunes are infused with an infectious “world” sound. His EP is currently available on Murfie, and it has contributions from musician Marcus Urani of Groundation.

I was lucky enough to chat with him the other day! Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Lior Ben-HurK: Thank you so much for calling in, how’s everything going?

L: Everything is great, and you?

K: It’s great! Where are you calling from today?

L: From San Francisco.

K: Ah, love it. You know, San Francisco—I feel like people have been talking lately about how expensive it’s getting to live there. Do you find it’s hard to keep a band in that city?

L: Very hard, and the city has been changing a lot—especially where I live, which is the Mission District. The city used to be a good place for artists when I moved into this neighborhood about 10 years ago, but it’s been taken over by high tech people with good income, and good paychecks, which makes the landlords raise the rent a lot. I think in the last three years probably most of the rent around me has been raised almost 100%, which means the artists are leaving the city. The art scene is not really here as much anymore. There are still some people, like myself and the band, but still it’s kind of hard because things are changing.

K: You spend a lot of time touring with the band and traveling, which seems to be the way musicians survive nowadays. And you’re from Jerusalem originally, so you’ve seen a lot of different countries. What types of music have stood out as your favorite?

L: Well I’ve been traveling a lot, and music that I’m really inspired by is Latin music and Caribbean music. I’ve spent some time in Columbia, and this summer we toured there a little bit, and it was really great to hear the music over there. Obviously I’m really inspired by Cuban music, Jamaican music, and the Caribbean style, and also Latin music as a whole. I’ve also traveled in southeast Asia, so I spent a lot of time in India. I’m not very knowledgeable about their music, but I’m inspired by their culture—their way of seeing musicians, and their place in the culture and society.

K: Do you like any other US-based bands that are considered “world” bands, like yours?

L: There are a few bands in San Francisco. We do kind of world reggae stuff, so the idea is to take a lot of inspiration from reggae and bring a new twist to it. There’s a great world reggae band in Israel, in Tel Aviv—their name is Zvuloon Dub System, and they combine Ethiopian music with roots reggae. Being here in California, one of my biggest influences is Groundation, and their take on reggae with their jazz and other influences. There are also bands here that are more on the world side and Latin side, especially in the Bay Area. It’s very inspiring for me and for the band.

Harrison and Marcus from Groundation on Kayla's radio show!

Harrison and Marcus from Groundation on Kayla’s radio show!

K: I love Groundation! They’ve come here to Madison and I’ve seen them play. Marcus Urani from Groundation, who played on your EP, played on my radio show as well. How did you link up with him?

L: Groundation has been a great influence in my personal journey into reggae and live music. I’ve seen them live in San Francisco many many times. The first time was about eight or nine years ago, and when I saw them live, they kind of blew my mind. I took a lot of inspiration and vision from seeing what they do. For example, the instrumentation—they have a vocal section and horn section. That always was my dream to do a full band. I’ve been lucky to get connected with them just by being around the Bay Area, and I reached out to Marcus and Jim Fox, who is the guy who mixes their albums, and the one who mixed the EP. So I reached out to Marcus, and he was very nice and generous, and offered to help out. He came to the studio and helped out, and we really formed a relationship. He is a great guy. We connected in not only music but on a personal level, and since then we’ve been friends. Of course they tour a lot, so it’s hard to see him because most of the year they’re gone. But actually, we’re going to get in the studio this month in California and record the new album. He’ll be helping engineer and produce it.

K: That’s awesome news! Do you have any new directions planned for this album, or will it be a continuation of what’s on the EP?

L: There is a concept and a direction. The EP is a reggae EP—we’ve done a lot of music throughout the year, a lot of world music, and the idea with the EP is just to bring our take on reggae. There is some in English and some in Hebrew, which are both the languages that I speak fluently and sing. The new album is going to connect a little bit of my Israel and Jerusalem roots to this musical experience, and tell the journey of coming from Jerusalem to Israel in the lyrics, in the message, and also in the music components.

K: Great. Well I’m excited to see what you come up with! Thanks so much for taking time to talk today—keep us posted about all the things you have going on in the future!

L: Sure thing, thank you for the time.

Kayla Liederbach

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


Meet Brandon: Murfie’s New Help Desk Manager!

This is Kayla writing this post! This month marks my fourth year at Murfie. First of all—wow, that’s exciting! Secondly—wow, things have really changed!

I began working in Operations, ripping discs and handling downloads. My previous experience in radio made me fit to create and host the Murfie Podcast. From there, I started doing more social media and PR for the company. And naturally, that’s where my role took off. I had been running the Murfie Help Desk too, but now it’s time to hand off that role to a qualified candidate, so that I can zero in on the social side of things.

And that qualified candidate is without a doubt Brandon. I went to the higher-ups with confidence that Brandon cared about the individual needs of members enough to be a great person for the job. However….can he really fill MY shoes? I had to ask him a few questions to put him on the spot. :)

K: Tell everyone a bit about yourself!

B: I am 21 years old and was born in Madison, WI. I’ve lived in Chicago, Boston, and Washington D.C. before moving back here. My hobbies include playing guitar and saxophone, painting, and enjoying video games. My favorite place to travel is the woods of British Columbia—so serene! My favorite music is electronic, classical, classic rock, and indie.

K: What do you like about working at Murfie?

B: For me, the best part about working at Murfie is discovering new music! I’ve come across LOADS of albums, either through co-workers or just browsing members’ shops, that have greatly broadened my horizons musically.

K: Why are you a good fit to run our Help Desk?

B: I’m a good fit to run our help desk because I specialize in Operations, which means I can facilitate the problem-solving process. Plus, I truly care about the needs of our members….I love the site as much as they do!

K: So, do you think you can fill my shoes? 

B: Yes! You have shown me the ropes, and I’m ready to help our members get the very best in customer support!

Brandon is ready to help with all your Murfie needs—contact him through our Help Desk and say hello! :) 


Parents of college students: Time to declutter, including CDs

Convert CDs into digital music that can be listened to anywhere.

Kids leaving for college is a huge change for everyone. New college freshmen are most likely living away from home for the first time, and their daily routines will be different. Parents will deal with the effects of having their kids leave to become young adults.

Material lives will change. College students can typically bring a fraction of the possessions they own into their new space. In many cases, parents are left with stuff. Loads and loads of it. It might seem ambitious to want to tackle sorting and downsizing everything, but it’s really not.

You can do small decluttering projects instead of visualizing everything as one incredibly huge and looming task ahead of you. Choose one small thing to start: like a CD collection that ‘s been building up.

Luckily there’s a way to declutter CDs that college students leave behind, without losing the music on them and the investment made in purchasing them. Murfie will store music CDs and convert them into digital files that can be listened to anywhere on phones, computers, and other devices.

Simply order a Shipping Kit from Murfie to get started. You’ll receive a box sized for your collection, plus tape and a return label. While your CDs are stored at Murfie, they will always remain your property, and you can have them returned at any time.

Decluttering your home and freeing up shelf space frees up the mind as well. Without CDs on your hands, you can focus on your next decluttering project and have music to listen to as you do it. Contact us to learn more!


Interview with Rip [Podcast]

Rip‘ is a Madison-based musician, DJ, producer, and filmmaker who seems to thrive when he’s hard at work. As a five-time winner at the Madison Hip Hop Awards, Rip has gained both local and national recognition for the music he makes, including his many followers on YouTube who love his danceable pop tunes. Rip has some exciting movie and music-related projects to share with us, along with insights about hip-hop in Madison, Facebook craziness, and connecting with fans.

Here’s a transcript of our interview, along with the Soundcloud link below for your listening pleasure.

Making of a SelloutWho: Rip; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Rip talks about his projects, the Madison scene, his Facebook break, and wild cinematography
Where: Murfie HQ, Madison, WI
When: Thursday, August 20th, 2015
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity. 

K: So right now I have DJ Rip here at the Murfie office, big welcome Rip.

R: I appreciate you having me, I always love doing interviews with you, it’s always a fun time.

K: Yes, and me and Rip, we go way back, just to fill everyone in. Like maybe six years?

R: Has it been that long?

K: Well I worked at Blue Velvet for five years, during college and a little bit after, which is a martini place in downtown Madison. Are you still DJing there?

R: Yeah I am, but you’re making me sound old now! Oh man, seriously time has been flying by since I came to Madison, it’s crazy.

K: You’re from Chicago area originally, right?

R: I grew up in the Chicagoland area, mainly Waukegan the majority of my childhood. I moved to Madison about, maybe if you wanna be technical, I made the official move in 2010, but I was hanging out here a few years before that.

K: How has the past year or so been for you in Madison? It’s finally summer now, maybe you get to go outside a bit more?

R: You know what, especially coming into today, it’s starting to get into fall now. I feel like the summer flew by. Honestly I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had time to enjoy the summer to be honest. It’s kind of sad, but…

K: Those creative types. So you recently produced a song for the Latin singer Rochelle, tell me a bit about that—it seemed like your career has gone full circle, since you used to listen to her.

R: Yeah, I don’t know how many people are familiar with Rochelle, but she was big in the 90s, especially in Chicago where I’m from. She had a song in the 90s called “Prayin’ for an Angel”, and I was a huge fan. She actually has a manger from Waukegan, where I’m from. So kind of just being intertwined from the same inner circle, he reached out to me. He’s been trying to get me to produce things for a while. And I just produced a song for her on her new album, so that was kind of crazy because I grew up being a fan of hers, and then producing something for her was cool.

K: And you’re also a director, and have made really great-looking videos. Tell me a bit about the feature length movie you’re working on.

R: I’m actually working on two movies right now. I just started a new one, and it’s still in the pre-production phase. I’m actually going to go work on it tonight after we’re done here. I teamed up with a local writer and director, because I’m not sure if a lot of people know I produce and direct all my music videos for my music. So I kind of got into this love and passion for filmmaking, and I’m working on a feature length film now with a local writer/director. And we just teamed up. He’s a great writer, great storyteller, and a great director. And he kind of brings something to the table that I lack, or don’t really have a burning desire for, which is the writing aspect of things. And I bring the creative aspect to the table that he lacks, which is the cinematography and the camerawork, and filmmaking process and everything. It’s crazy because he and I are like one in the same almost, you know what I mean? We have the same drive, same determination, same passion, same views, outlooks and beliefs on a lot of things, and it’s just kind of crazy that we’re two similar guys and we just teamed up. We’ve been working on this movie for two months now, and it’s all locally filmed, directed, produced right here in Madison. And we’ve had a lot of hurdles, but we’re still dealing with it, and the driven people we are, we’re not going to let it stop us or slow us down.

K: That’s awesome, so you’re staying busy. And it seems like you’re always churning out fresh video content. What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done for a video, cinematically?

R: I’d have to say, when we were right on King Street in front of the courthouse, in my “Supernatural” music video. It’s probably my most notable piece of work. There was a 3D modeled rendered car that was coming at me, and I smash it, and it goes flying over my head. So it’s like this visual effect that I think was pretty dope. The best thing I’ve done so far, music video wise.

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Ownership Matters: What Apple Music users and Jim Dalrymple should know

“This is Apple Music. And it’s just the beginning.”

Apple’s website tells all: a single user can subscribe to their new streaming service, Apple Music, for $9.99/month. Though it is in fact just beginning, the new service has been met with a cascade of criticism.

Users reported some major hiccups with the service, including the iCloud Music Library aspect, which is meant to bring your iTunes library onto all your devices for you to stream anywhere. Users were reporting duplicate songs, songs that were moved to the wrong album, and missing songs.

Apple blogger Jim Dalrymple’s situation was particularly upsetting. When he was having complications with Apple Music, he decided to turn it off on his devices, resulting in what looked like 4,700 songs disappearing from his view. It’s reason to panic indeed, although Apple Music technically does not alter any of the original song files stored on your PC or other locations.

If your music “disappears”, whether permanently or temporarily, it’s important to have a backup just in case. Choosing to buy physical music that you own saves you from losing files, and from being at the mercy of a large music service, which are both terrifying things.

When you buy a CD on Murfie for example, we’ll give you the download to add to your iTunes, and streaming access you can take anywhere. If something happens to your files, whether it’s your fault or Apple’s, you’ll always have a perfect archive of all the music you own, ready to be downloaded again at any time. If you don’t want to hang on to the CD, we’ll hang on to it for you.

If you choose ownership, you will always have access, and there will be no need to worry. This is something that all Apple users, including Jim Dalrymple, should hopefully know—and we’d love to have them try us out!