Pink Floyd

Best of the Best: Pink Floyd

Earlier this month, Polly Samson, wife of Pink Floyd singer-guitarist David Gilmour, casually tweeted about the release of a new album in October of this year. It will be the first album to be released under the name Pink Floyd in twenty years, and as expected, classic rock enthusiasts immediately voiced their excitement.

Further details have emerged about the true nature of the mysterious release. Entitled Endless River, the album will re-examine material cut from the 1994 release of The Division Bell. It appears as if David Gilmour and drummer Nick Mason will be expanding pieces of instrumental ambient music initially composed by keyboardist Richard Wright, adding vocals and overdubs to breathe new life into the old recordings. Roger Waters, the main creative force behind the band during their greatest height, will have zero involvement with the new record. One cannot help but feel that Endless River is shaping up to be more of a David Gilmour-inspired side project than a genuine Pink Floyd recording.

Personally, my fingers are not crossed for classic Floyd brilliance. I will still anxiously await the October release, and I will certainly be one of the first in line to buy it. In any case, the recent resurgence in Pink Floyd hype inspired me to have a retrospective listen of the band’s discography. Here are my top five albums.

5. Meddle (1971)

Meddle

Meddle is a nifty little album that traverses the sonic spectrum. Unlike later Pink Floyd albums, Meddle features compositions and contributions from every member of the band. The idea of the ‘concept album’ had not yet entered the band’s identity, although the 23-minute “Echoes” that closes out the album can be seen as a grandfather piece to later lengthy epics like “Shine on You Crazy Diamond.” The rest of the album’s tracks are relatively short and distinct, and apart from the obnoxiously atrocious “Seamus,” there’s a unique and somewhat uncharacteristic lightheartedness to the album.

Album highlight: “Fearless”

 

4. The Dark Side of the Moon (1973)

The Dark Side of the Moon

Pink Floyd hit it big with this one. A journey through sound and sight, The Dark Side of the Moon is continually marked as a masterpiece in engineering, songwriting, and musicality. With bassist and singer Roger Waters taking the songwriting reigns, the band started themselves down a path of greatness. The decade following The Dark Side of the Moon would launch Pink Floyd into international superstars. There’s not much more to be said about this album. If you haven’t experienced it, buy it now.

Album highlight: Sound engineering on “Us and Them”

 

3. The Final Cut (1983)

The Final Cut

Here’s the album that finally broke the band. Roger Waters had assumed almost total control of the creative process, and was crafting The Final Cut as a sequel to The Wall. Artistic differences, fights within the band, and the clashing of massive egos riddled the recording sessions. Despite Roger Waters leaving the band and effectively dissolving the successful quartet of Pink Floyd, the album represents some of Waters’ best work. Autobiographical and heartfelt, The Final Cut holds up amidst the band’s best.

Album highlight: Lyrics on “The Final Cut”

 

2. Wish You Were Here (1975)

Wish You Were Here

Often regarded as one of the band’s best works, Wish You Were Here clocks in with 5 tracks and contemplates issues of greed and sanity. Some of David Gilmour’s best guitar work is heard in the “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” compositions, and the synthesizer performance on “Welcome to the Machine” has become an icon of the band’s sound and feel. The guitar riff that begins the album’s title track remains one of the most recognizable pieces of music in all of rock music. Overall, the album is one of the band’s most cohesive and energetic releases.

Album highlight: Synthesizer solos on “Welcome to the Machine”

 

1. The Wall (1979)

The Wall

Here we have the greatest of them all. Two hours of music. The perfect concept album. Rock opera at its best. Roger Waters’ jewel in his Pink Floyd crown. After infamously spitting on a fan during a disorderly concert in Montreal, Waters began to fantasize about building a wall between himself and his fans. What followed was an album dealing with themes of loneliness, expression, disillusionment, war, religion, art, politics, love, sex, hate, and drugs. And that’s just the first disc.

Album highlight: All of it. Just listen to all of it.

 

In a discography spanning over a dozen studio albums, these five are arguably the best of the best. If you agree or disagree, let me know in the comments! And, of course, check out the Pink Floyd discography on Murfie.


Grant Peterre
@gpeterre

Grant is a Communications Intern at Murfie. He has played the guitar nearly his entire life, and his music and writings have been featured in international publications. He makes his home in both the United States and Italy, and will always be traveling in search of something.


Perpetual at Best: Songs That Get Stuck in My Head

Headache

Warning: This article contains content that may cause severe psychological annoyance. For better or for worse, these are songs that enter the deepest recesses of my subconscious and squat the land of my cerebral campground like an unwanted relative around the holidays. These are not necessarily “bad” songs. However, upon hearing them in one’s head for the ten thousandth time, the lines between “good” and “bad” become nonexistent. The songs become, instead, perpetual at best.

My mind is a psychotic radio dial. When I wake up in the morning, music immediately begins to swell in my head whether I Come Away With Mepress the play button or not. I do not have a radio alarm clock; it seems as if I was born with one already installed. Some days this is a blessing. Who wouldn’t want to wake up and start the day with Elvis Costello or Norah Jones crooning them through their morning routine? Or maybe a bit of Madama Butterfly for a dramatic edge to the day? I like these days.

Then there are other days, or sometimes even weeks, where I find myself waking up to an immediate crescendo of Michael Jackson’s “P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing)” from Thriller. I couldn’t explain it at first; I hadn’t heard this song in years. In an attempt to force it out of my head, I tried listening to it over and over again throughout my daily activities. ThrillerBrushing my teeth, I had it playing in the other room. Smearing butter over toast in the kitchen, it was blaring away. Leading a 1970′s disco troupe in a synchronized dance-off in my living room, you bet it was playing. Sometimes you have to sacrifice your sanity to put a spring in your step.

How did I eventually cure myself of this Michael Jackson madness? A chance encounter with Mott the Mott the HoopleHoople’s 1972 smash hit, “All the Young Dudes.” I didn’t stand a chance against this song: from the mighty and infectious guitar solo in the opening bars, to the glam-rock bell tones of the chromatically descending chorus, the song loops in my head like rock and roll funeral march. The song was written by David Bowie specifically for the band upon hearing that they were on the verge of breaking up. (Fun fact: the song that Bowie had originally offered the band was “Suffragette City,” which would later become a hit on The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Mott the Hoople turned it down.)

Permission to Land

Speaking of glam-rock, we come to the greatest ear-worm of them all: “I Believe in a Thing Called Love,” by The Darkness. This 2003 release is almost a caricature of itself; ear-piercing falsetto vocals and over-the-top guitar and synth transport the listener to the heyday of the 1970s. The chorus is catchy to the point of being almost unforgettable. In my own case, I literally cannot forget it. And I think I’m okay with that.

Want something stuck in your head? Murfie makes it easy. Buy CDs in our marketplace starting at $2 ,and you’ll see what I mean. 



Grant Peterre
@gpeterre

Grant is a Communications Intern at Murfie. He has played the guitar nearly his entire life, and his music and writings have been featured in international publications. He makes his home in both the United States and Italy, and will always be traveling in search of something.


This Week in Music History (May 28th-June 3rd)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

Oops I did it again5/28- On this day in 2000, Britney Spears topped the new millenium’s album chart with Oops!…I Did It Again. The album sold 1,319,000 copies in its first week and went on to reach No.1 in thirteen other countries. To date, it has sold over 20 million copies.

365447-large5/29- On this day in 1942, Bing Crosby recorded the Irving Berlin song “White Christmas” with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra and the Ken Darby Singers. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Crosby’s version is the best-selling single of all time, with sales to date topping 50 million.

Beatles5/30- On this day in 1964, The Beatles‘ single “Love Me Do” reached No.1 on the US singles chart, the group’s fourth US No.1 in five months’ time. Although the single was originally released in the United Kingdom in October 1962, it did not become a hit in the United States until 1964.

114141-large5/31- On this day in 1977, The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) announced a ban on the new Sex Pistols single “God Save the Queen”. Although the single reached No.2 on the UK chart, the BBC declared it to be “in gross bad taste” and considered it to be an assault on Queen Elizabeth II and the monarchy. Lead singer Johnny Rotten, however, explained, “You don’t write ‘God Save the Queen’ because you hate the English race. You write a song like that because you love them and you’re fed up with them being mistreated.”

32093-large6/1- On this day in 1968, Simon & Garfunkel went to No.1 on the US singles chart with “Mrs. Robinson”. An early version of the song was featured in the film The Graduate, starring Dustin Hoffmann and Ann Bancroft. It was then re-recorded to be released as a single, which went on to win the duo a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

7400-large6/2- On this day in 1984, British duo Wham! had their first No.1 hit with “Wake Me Up Before You Go Go”. The song was written and produced by British musician George Michael, who was one half of the duo. Michael’s inspiration for the song was a note his Wham! partner Andrew Ridgeley had left for his parents which read “Wake me up up before you go go”.

13293-large6/3- On this day in 1967, soul legend Aretha Franklin hit No.1 on the US singles chart with her cover of Otis Redding‘s hit song “Respect”. Although the two versions were musically very similar, Aretha’s version added the famous R-E-S-P-E-C-T chorus and backup singers’ refrain of “Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me…”

Find these musical gems in our CD marketplace, and own your own pieces of music history! Every album purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC. :-)

This Week in Music History (May 21st-27th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

300492-large5/21- On this day in 1970, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young released the single “Ohio” in reaction to the May 4, 1970 Kent State shootings during which unarmed college students were shot by members of the Ohio National Guard.

2174-large5/22- On this day in 1965, The Beatles reached No.1 on the US singles chart with their track “Ticket to Ride”. The song was the group’s eighth No.1 hit. It was also used in the Beatles’ second film Help! and was a part of the film’s soundtrack.

375787-large5/23- On this day in 1970, Paul McCartney‘s debut solo album McCartney began a three-week run atop the US album chart. Apart from a few vocal contributions by Linda McCartney, McCartney performed and recorded the entire album as a solo project.

101405-large5/24- On this day in 1974, jazz legend, bandleader, composer and pianist Duke Ellington died of lung cancer and pneumonia at age 75. Ellington’s career spanned over 50 years; he was awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement award in 1966, and the United States Mint launched a new coin featuring his face in 2009.

32093-large5/25- On this day in 1968, Simon and Garfunkel‘s fourth studio album Bookends became the duo’s second US No.1 hit. The album was a breakthrough for the pair, launching them to superstar status. It contained their No.1 hit single “Mrs. Robinson”, which went on to win a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

12589-large5/26- On this day in 1990, the top five positions on the US singles chart were held by female artists for the first time. Madonna was at No.1 with “Vogue”, members of Heart were at No.2, Sinead O’Connor at No.3, Wilson Phillips at No.4, and Janet Jackson at No. 5.

114141-large5/27- On this day in 1977, The Sex Pistols‘ single “God Save the Queen” was released in the United Kingdom. Although the track sold over 200,000 copies in one week and peaked at No.2 on the UK charts, it was banned by TV, radio, and stores because of its controversial lyrics.

Pick up these pieces of music history in our CD marketplace! Every album purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, and lossless formats FLAC and ALAC. :-)

This Week in Music History (May 15th-21st)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

Rolling Stones - Black and Blue5/15- On this day in 1976, The Rolling Stones hit No.1 on the US album chart with Black and Blue. The album was the band’s sixth No. 1 hit, and its first featuring Ronnie Wood as the replacement for guitarist Mick Taylor.

Beach Boys - Pet Sounds5/16- On this day in 1966, The Beach Boys released their now-iconic eleventh studio album Pet SoundsThe album is considered their masterpiece and one of the most influential records ever released. In 2003, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked it No.2 on their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list.

7872-large5/17- On this day in 1975, Elton John released his ninth studio album, Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy. It became the first album to debut at No.1 on the US pop charts, and stayed there for seven weeks. It was eventually certified 3x platinum.

5820-large5/18- On this day in 2011, John Lennon‘s handwritten lyrics for The Beatles‘ 1967 hit “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” sold for $237,132 at auction in Beverly Hills, California. Although popular speculation held that the song was written about drug LSD, Lennon insisted that the song was inspired by a picture Lennon’s son Julian had drawn of a classmate named Lucy Vodden.

11051-large5/19- On this day in 1973, Stevie Wonder went to No. 1 on the US singles chart with his track “You Are the Sunshine of My Life”. The song, which was his third US No.1, won him a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance.

5943-large5/20- On this day in 1966, John Entwistle and Keith Moon of The Who were running late to a gig and unable to arrive at the venue on time. Bandmates Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey enlisted the help of a bass player and drummer from a local band in order to play the set. The replacements played until Entwistle and Moon arrived in the middle of the set.

12936-large5/21- On this day in 2011, Adele reached No.1 on the US singles chart with “Rolling in the Deep” from 21, her second studio album. The song was the Billboard Year End Hot 100 Number One Single of 2011 and received three Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Short Form Music Video. 

Find these music history gems in our music marketplace! Every CD purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC. :-)


Ally Boutelle
@arboutelle

Ally is a communications intern at Murfie, blogging about all things music. When she’s not typing away, she cooks spicy food, does hot yoga, and reads weird history books. She’s also a college student double majoring in history and journalism.