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Music for lovers and haters

[Photo courtesy of Mother Fools in Madison]

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner—and depending on who you are, you could see this as exciting, or depressing, or just another day! Whether you’re in a relationship or not, we have some Valentine’s Day music picks for your playlist.

Songs of Love and HateSongs of Love and hate
Leonard Cohen

“Something for everyone. The swelling strings, arpeggiated acoustic guitars, and Cohen’s crooning allow the album to fit well into any romantic candle-lit scene until you decide to pay attention to what he’s singing.” – Marc

Lady in SatinLady in Satin
Billie Holiday

“Still a little more often sad than romantic, but for people who feel a bit of both it can make for a great evening.”
– Andrew

Gregory Isaacs

The Millennium Collection
Gregory Isaacs

“Some lovers rock from the cool ruler Gregory Isaacs is perfect for Valentine’s Day. Plus his songs are backed by the amazing Roots Radics band.” – Kayla

Lovers Rock

Lovers Rock
Sade

“Amazing, seductive vocals.”
– Matt

COWBOY MOUTH 2014 HIGH RES IMAGE

Cowboy Mouth Interview

Cowboy Mouth is an energetic, fun-loving, pure-hearted New Orleans rock band with a twist of cajun and blues influence. Since the release of their first album, Word of Mouth, in 1992, the band has gained notoriety nationwide. With a current string of shows and a new album, Go, the time was perfect for us at Murfie to get in touch.

Below is a transcript of a phone call between Cowboy Mouth frontman Fred LeBlanc and myself (Kayla), from a few weeks ago in January. Fred is an entertaining fellow with a lot to say about the 90s music era, the changing music scene, the influence of big labels, and the vibrant energy in the southern United States. Read on and enjoy!

Fred LeBlanc Cowboy MouthK: Right now I have Fred Leblanc on the phone from Cowboy Mouth.

F: Woo-hoo!

K: Welcome! Where are you calling from today?

F: I’m calling from my house in Mississippi.

K: How’s the typical winter in Mississippi?

F: Well, seeing that you’re calling me from Wisconsin, I really have no reason to complain about anything as far as winter goes, ‘cause I could sit here and whine about the temperatures in the 40s, and you guys would probably think, “Oh, what a puss”—and you’d be right about that! But I get to do the same thing during the summer. As you sit there and complain about temperatures in the 70s and 80s, I’m sitting here, you know high 90s early 100s, or something like that, and I could call you a puss back. So I’m not gonna complain, it’s beautiful, every day above ground. Right?

K: Absolutely. You guys are doing your thing down south, and Cowboy Mouth has been in action for two decades at least, so it’s cool to talk to you because you have all this perspective on rock music and the industry—

F: Haha! That’s a nice way of saying, “Gimme what you’ve got, Grandpa!”

K: Haha! So it’s really valuable, and I’m sure you’ve seen a lot, which leads me to something I was wondering about—the rock scene, and how it’s changed over the years. I know it was kinda grunge-y when you got started. So how have you seen things change?

F: Well we were kind of like, not the antithesis to the grunge thing—it’s more of a matter of timing. In fact, we were around a couple years before that burst forth on the national zeitgeist. In fact, we would see a lof of those bands in the same clubs that we played. I played at a club called Raji’s in L.A. a bunch of times, and then I saw that club on the back of Nirvana’s first album Bleach. There’s a picture of them performing at Raji’s. So it was all kind of bubbling under, and then it just kind of took over for a while. You had big bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, other bands who got notoriety like Mudhoney. They had all been around a while. Then a few years later, we were kind of lumped in with some of the other 90s bands who weren’t quite as angst-ridden, bands like Better than Ezra, Hootie & the Blowfish, Matchbox Twenty, all these bands who had just been touring around the same time. So for me, in terms of changes, a lot of the big changes came close to later in the 90s, when everything changed and went either hard-hard-hard rock, or obscene hard-hard-hard pop. And for me, I was kind of glad to see the whole major label game disappear because, as their influence became a lot more…unable to shake off—the music got kind of worse. You had the emergence of things like Britney Spears and Fred Durst [Limp Bizkit] at the same time. You know, it’s just not my cup of tea because musically they were both so extreme. This music fits comfortably into this box. I call it “McDonald’s Music”, in that it’s designed to be eaten, and crapped out, making room for the next musical Big Mac. And there’s a place for that—that’s fine, but that’s not why I wanted to play music. I always wanted to be a more creative person, take a chance with styles, learn new ways to perform, and ingratiate those. I didn’t want it to be just one thing continuously over and over and over again. But that’s me.

K: Sure, that’s some truth about the industry. And yes, there’s a consumption element to it all, that maybe wasn’t there when music was more pure…

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VOTE: 2015 Murfie Listener’s Choice Awards

If you’re like us at the office… then maybe you enjoy the excitement of the GRAMMYs, but you think the nominees aren’t really THE best out of all the music out there. Obviously a lot of it has to do with what’s mainstream, what’s played on commercial radio, and things like that.

The Murfie staffers discussed this a bit, and we came up with our own list of nominees and categories. We have a broad range of musical taste here and totally pride ourselves on exploring what’s not popular, without denying the popular stuff that’s rightfully good.

Now, you, the people, can choose the winners in our 2015 Murfie Listener’s Choice Awards! Voting ends on Thursday, February 5th at noon—one vote per person, please! We’ll let you know who the winners are before the GRAMMYs air on Sunday February 8th!

Click the “Vote” button after each category to save your vote.

[Click “Continue reading” to view all categories]

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Top 10 Most-Owned Albums!

For so long, the most popular album on Murfie—in terms of overall number in our ecosystem—has been Dave Matthews Band Crash. Today, a literal new paradigm shift is upon us, as information has unearthed about our new most popular album on the site.

(…and it’s leading the board by ONE copy! ONE!)

To please the list-loving humans that we are, here’s a list of our Top 10 albums on Murfie. Do you have these in your collection? Most are available right now for $1 – $3!

Achtung Baby #1. U2
Achtung Baby

431 copies

Crash#2. Dave Matthews Band
Crash

430 copies

Jagged Little Pill#3. Alanis Morissette
Jagged Little Pill

422 copies

Come Away With ME#4 – Tie! Norah Jones
Come Away With Me

416 copies

The Joshua Tree#4 – Tie! U2
The Joshua Tree

416 copies

Under the Table and Dreaming#5. Dave Matthews Band
Under the Table and Dreaming

384 copies

Unplugged#6. Eric Clapton
Unplugged

368 copies

Supernatural#7. Santana
Supernatural

351 copies

Cracked Rear View#8 – Tie! Hootie & the Blowfish
Cracked Rear View

347 copies

James Taylor Greatest Hits#8 – Tie! James Taylor
Greatest Hits

347 copies

Sufacing#9. Sarah McLachlan
Surfacing

344 copies

Legend#10. Bob Marley & the Wailers
Legend

343 copies

So what does this all mean, though? This list doesn’t closely correspond to the reported top selling albums of all time. Perhaps Murfie members are a group of like-minded folk, or perhaps we’re all around the same age, and have been exposed to the same big hits during our lifetimes. In any case, it’s interesting to make note of the patterns we see in our own music community!

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How to ship CDs you buy directly to Murfie

Our goal is to help you grow your music collection. If an album is out of stock, click the “Find it for me!” button and we’ll try to locate a copy for you.

If an album isn’t showing in your search results at all, email us at info@murfie.com and we’ll try to find you a copy.

If you can’t acquire an album those ways, we still have you covered! You can buy CDs elsewhere online and ship them directly to your Murfie collection.

When you buy a CD through another retailer, simply put Murfie’s warehouse address, your name, and your User ID in the shipping address. You can find that info in the proper format on your Profile Page (Look under “Direct Shipments To Your Murfie Collection”).

This service is meant for the occasional shipments of CDs you can’t find in our member shops. If you are shipping CDs you acquire in bulk (more than 3 CDs at once, or more than 10 per month), we add them to your collection at our standard kit rate.

After we receive your CDs, we’ll post the files online and email you when they’re ready to stream and download!