Top 10 Most-Owned Albums!

For so long, the most popular album on Murfie—in terms of overall number in our ecosystem—has been Dave Matthews Band Crash. Today, a literal new paradigm shift is upon us, as information has unearthed about our new most popular album on the site.

(…and it’s leading the board by ONE copy! ONE!)

To please the list-loving humans that we are, here’s a list of our Top 10 albums on Murfie. Do you have these in your collection? Most are available right now for $1 – $3!

Achtung Baby #1. U2
Achtung Baby

431 copies

Crash#2. Dave Matthews Band
Crash

430 copies

Jagged Little Pill#3. Alanis Morissette
Jagged Little Pill

422 copies

Come Away With ME#4 – Tie! Norah Jones
Come Away With Me

416 copies

The Joshua Tree#4 – Tie! U2
The Joshua Tree

416 copies

Under the Table and Dreaming#5. Dave Matthews Band
Under the Table and Dreaming

384 copies

Unplugged#6. Eric Clapton
Unplugged

368 copies

Supernatural#7. Santana
Supernatural

351 copies

Cracked Rear View#8 – Tie! Hootie & the Blowfish
Cracked Rear View

347 copies

James Taylor Greatest Hits#8 – Tie! James Taylor
Greatest Hits

347 copies

Sufacing#9. Sarah McLachlan
Surfacing

344 copies

Legend#10. Bob Marley & the Wailers
Legend

343 copies

So what does this all mean, though? This list doesn’t closely correspond to the reported top selling albums of all time. Perhaps Murfie members are a group of like-minded folk, or perhaps we’re all around the same age, and have been exposed to the same big hits during our lifetimes. In any case, it’s interesting to make note of the patterns we see in our own music community!

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How to ship CDs you buy directly to Murfie

Our goal is to help you grow your music collection. If an album is out of stock, click the “Find it for me!” button and we’ll try to locate a copy for you.

If an album isn’t showing in your search results at all, email us at info@murfie.com and we’ll try to find you a copy.

If you can’t acquire an album those ways, we still have you covered! You can buy CDs elsewhere online and ship them directly to your Murfie collection.

When you buy a CD through another retailer, simply put Murfie’s warehouse address, your name, and your User ID in the shipping address. You can find that info in the proper format on your Profile Page (Look under “Direct Shipments To Your Murfie Collection”).

This service is meant for the occasional shipments of CDs you can’t find in our member shops. If you are shipping CDs you acquire in bulk (more than 3 CDs at once, or more than 10 per month), we add them to your collection at our standard kit rate.

After we receive your CDs, we’ll post the files online and email you when they’re ready to stream and download!

Song One (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) Review

Album Review: “Song One (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)” by Various Artists

I’m not the kind of person that listens to a lot of movie soundtracks. When I do pick one up, it’s usually because of its use in the film itself (see for example Hans Zimmer’s recent Interstellar score, or the excellent Clint Mansell collaboration with Kronos Quartet and Mogwai for The Fountain).

Song One (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

As I write this, however, Song One‘s full theatrical / on-demand release is still a week or so away. While Interstellar‘s music blew me away in the theater, I went into the Song One soundtrack with a completely different context. Song One (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) piqued my interest last November when it was announced that songwriting duo Jenny Lewis and Johnathan Rice were set to score the film and produce its soundtrack.

I’ve been a Jenny Lewis fan since the days of Rilo Kiley (side note: as a kid, I for sure had a crush on her in The Wizard, but that doesn’t count). Luckily, in the post-Rilo Kiley years, there has been no shortage of Jenny Lewis listening. From the b-sides Rkives album to her recent solo album The Voyager, Lewis has kept busy.

Jenny and Johnny debuted their collaborative efforts all the way back in 2010, which makes Song One an interesting place to reunite in a formal way. The pair serve as both writers for all but one of the soundtrack’s original songs and producers of the album and recordings. You’ll also find their talents in the form of occasional backing vocals.

Peppered among the soundtrack’s original tunes is a generally well-curated selection of other songs. Most of the songs fit really well, making Song One feel much closer to an album than a random selection of soundtrack-y hits. Standouts include the excellent “One Day” by Sharon Van Etten and America‘s “I Need You.”

While most of the soundtrack feels cohesive in tone, there are some questionable inclusions that may take the film’s context to appreciate. I’m a big Dan Deacon supporter, but in an album of folky, country-influenced rock songs, “The Crystal Cat” is a strange choice. And while Portuguese song “O Leaozinho” is interesting, I just didn’t enjoy this recording all that much.

Song One Still

Song One stars Johnny Flynn & Anne Hathaway

The meat of this soundtrack is clearly the original songs, which all—to my relief—feel like they could have been Jenny and Johnny canon. Nothing feels like a throwaway. In a world of cash-ins and sequels, I wouldn’t have been surprised to see a film like Song One turn into a late-to-the-party Once ripoff, but it’s crystal clear that everyone involved with this soundtrack cared a lot.

My favorite originals have to be “Iris, Instilled” and the soundtrack’s single “In April.” It’s important to mention some excellent performances by one of the film’s stars, Johnny Flynn, the voice behind Song One’s originals. Beyond vocals, Flynn also contributes guitar, piano and violin throughout the soundtrack.

For a movie about music, it’s refreshing to see such obvious collaboration through and through. The songs that really work here are the ones where Johnny Flynn, Jenny Lewis and Johnathan Rice are all involved. If you’ve heard a lot of Jenny Lewis’ work, it’s easy to hear that Flynn’s delivery serves her style of phrasing well.

While not bad per se, the lone original not performed by Johnny Flynn, “Marble Song,” was probably the most forgettable. Likewise, “Afraid of Heights,” which seems to be taken directly from the film, was not written by Jenny and Johnny. The recording quality on that track is notably worse than the rest of the album. If it was indeed taken from the movie itself, the poor mixing is a concern.

Song One (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) is not perfect, but it is certainly a treat for fans of Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice or their combined efforts. The worst thing about Song One is that you might want to skip a track here or there, but that’s hardly a problem when the soundtrack is so generous with good, original music. Here’s hoping we get more Jenny and Johnny sooner rather than later!

Jenny and Johnny

Jenny and Johnny


John Kruse
@johnkruse

John Praw Kruse is an Operations Manager, and Product Manager for the Murfie Vinyl Service. In his free time, John makes music, including scores for indie films and various shorts. He is the founder of Mine All Mine Records and the Lost City Music Festival. John devours new music.


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Ownership Matters: A way to own digital media you buy online

In his piece for PoliticoMagazine, Kyle K. Courtney describes the questionably precise positioning of the “buy” button so commonly found next to music and movies online.

“When Amazon, iTunes or any digital retailer explicitly says ‘Buy Now’ and the consumer clicks that ‘buy’ button, there is a definite presumption of purchase, and, with that purchase, ownership. That presumption, however, is not reflected in reality,” says Courtney.

If you read the pages of fine print, which many of us don’t, you’ll see you’re not really “buying” anything. Your content is only as protected as the terms say it is, and only if the retailer maintains your access to the content you paid for, as they or their service can close at any time. Most of the digital content you buy is not protected by the solid legal rights you get when you purchase media in its traditional physical format.

So why do people keep buying into media they’ll never own? Courtney says, “We are attracted — and have become accustomed — to the convenience of rapid purchases and on-demand content. When it comes time to move our online MP3 collection or transfer digital content to another device, then we face a surprising reality: We do not really own our electronic music, books and movies in the same way we do when we purchase physical books, CDs, records or DVDs.”

With the Murfie service, we’ve created a hybrid of physical and digital ownership: digital content with true ownership rights in the underlying media you own. The music you buy on Murfie can be available instantly to stream, and you can sell it to someone else if you decide it’s not for you. This is possible because each album you buy is backed by a corresponding physical copy that we store at our headquarters. It’s up to you if you want to store your titles on our shelves or yours, but the digital access is available to you anywhere.

On-demand music and movies are convenient, and it’s true that not everyone will care about owning everything they pay for. But the main issue, Courtney seems to be saying, is transparency. If we’re not really “buying” the digital content from these other big-name services, that should be clear. Then people will have the information to make informed choices about real purchases vs. rental contracts, and go for an ownership-based model if that’s what they desired in the first place.

In the future, we could have ownership that’s free of the physical backups. This could be possible with better contracts around digital content, which could allow buyers to have permanent and transferable rights connected to the media they bought, in formats that work across vendors and services. At Murfie we refer to this as a Physical Equivalent License, and we’re working on offering one down the road—and when it happens, we’ll be sure to state what you are really paying for clearly, right on the buttons in the shops.

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Your Dose of Cool: Gregory Isaacs

Gregory Isaacs is the Cool Ruler. He is widely known for his “Lovers Rock” style of reggae, singing songs about women, heartache, and of course, lots of lovers.

Gregory was born in 1951 in Kingston, Jamaica, which was a hotbed of talent for reggae in the 1970s by the time he reached adulthood. He was, and still is, known for his unique voice and catchy melodies. He recorded songs with some of Jamaica’s most well-respected producers, including Lee “Scratch” Perry and Niney the Observer. During his lifetime, he reached international success alongside others like Bob Marley and Dennis Brown. Sadly, Gregory died of lung cancer in 2010, but his musical legacy lives on today, and his music is loved by those who truly appreciate great reggae.

One of his most popular songs is “Night Nurse.”

In 2011, over a dozen modern reggae artists joined together to make a compilation of Gregory Isaacs covers for the album We Remember Gregory Isaacs. The album contains performances by Tarrus Riley, Jah Cure, and Busy Signal, to name a few. The lovely ladies Etana and Alaine put their own spin on Gregory covers as well. Disc two of the album has the same track list, only with saxophone instead of vocals, played by the famous Jamaican saxophonist Dean Fraser who has contributed to hundreds of recordings over the course of his career. The album is certainly a treasure and a wonderful tribute to Gregory.

Check out our selection of Gregory Isaacs albums on Murfie and get some Cool Ruler in your collection!


Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.