Pigeon John

Interview with Pigeon John [Podcast]

Pigeon John is a rapper and more—with a deep focus on the musical element of his songs and influences from De La Soul to The Beatles, lovers of pop, rock, and blues can easily find themselves turned on to his sound. After continually evolving over the years, Pigeon John has discovered himself as a writer and storyteller, making his everlasting mark on the exciting genre of hip hop.

Encino Man is set to be released April 29th—order your copy on Murfie today!

Encino ManWho: Pigeon John; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Pigeon John describes the similar spirit in all music, the importance of being your own planet, and the dangerous, relevant, “pinpoint sharp” American genre known as hip hop.
Where: Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (Cleveland, OH) and Murfie headquarters (Madison, WI), via Skype
When: Wednesday, March 12th, 2014
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Find music by Pigeon John in our shop.

Check out more at pigeonjohn.com.

Into RSS? Follow our podcast feed via http://blog.murfie.com/category/podcasts/feed.

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Interview with Paper Bird

Mark Anderson was a really great person to chat with earlier this year on the Murfie Podcast. He plays percussion in Paper Bird, a harmonious seven-piece band that’s gaining more and more national buzz each day. Here’s a transcript of our interview, and another chance to dig in to the interesting world of up-and-coming music.

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast, right from murfie.com: the world’s largest used and new CD store online. So, one band that I’m really diggin’ right now is Paper Bird. They’re a seven-piece indie folk band from Colorado. I had a chat with one of the band members, Mark, right after they released their new album, Rooms.

[MUSIC: “As I Am” by Paper Bird]

Kayla: Alright, so right now I have Mark on the phone, from Paper Bird. Where are you calling from?

Mark: I’m just calling from my apartment in Denver, Colorado.

Kayla: Ok, yes, I saw that you guys are from Colorado, and I’ve never been there, but I’ve heard a lot of great things about that place. So, are a lot of people in the band from Colorado, originally, or did you guys end up there?

Mark: Um, most of us are from here, originally. Some of us were born other places—like Sarah, my sister, and I, were born in Ohio, but moved here when we were really young—and then a couple of members were born in Texas. But all of us say we’re from Colorado—it’s where we grew up.

Kayla: Right—it’s your home, totally! You and Sarah are brother and sister—I did not know that.

Mark: Yeah, yeah. There’s another set of siblings in the band, too: Genny and Esme are sisters.

Kayla: Oh, awesome! That’s fun.

Mark: Yeah.

Kayla: How did you all meet each other?

Mark: Well, we’ve known each other for a long time—it kind of was a culmination of coincidence and then also just like, common interest. Like, we all moved to Denver—um, god, I don’t know, we’ve lived in Denver for a long time. And I think just like, through random acquaintances, and some people through school and things like that, a loose group of us started getting together—and then music is what pulled us in farther, and slowly our friendships culminated into the band, and we’ve been doing it for like, six years now.

Kayla: That’s the best way to get started, you know—the music brings you together, the common interests. And you guys have developed a really unique sound, because basically everybody in the band contributes to writing songs and that sort of thing; so is that how it usually works? Do you guys kind of come to each other and say, “I have an idea for a song,” and then do you work on it together?

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Interview with Kiwi [Podcast]

Have you ever discovered a band during their live show, and found yourself a delighted dancing machine? Well, that happened to me when I saw the band Kiwi play a show with New Kingston, Groundation and John Brown’s Body in NYC. We’re talking jazzy, rootsy music with the whole works: horns, keys, guitar, bass, and positive, clever vocals. Alright, enough with the intro—take a listen for yourself!

Who: Alex Tea of Kiwi; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: An interesting discussion about Kiwi, music fusion, the rise of the homemade music movement, influence from The Beatles, The Wailers and more.
Where: Murfie HQ via Skype
When: Thursday, November 14th, 2013
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Guess what—for the first time, we’ll be getting a free streaming concert on the Murfie Podcast! Tune in this Wednesday night at 9pm CT/10pm ET to hear Alex play us acoustic songs by Kiwi!

VIEW EVENT DETAILS HERE

Find music by Kiwi in our shop.

Check out more of the band at kiwirootsmusic.com.

Into RSS? Follow our podcast feed via http://blog.murfie.com/category/podcasts/feed.

Interview with Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin [Podcast]

Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin is a band worth checking out! Their at-home recordings fit well with their indie pop sound. Since 2005, they’ve put out a solid discography that’s received rave reviews, and even earned themselves a spot in the soundtrack of the popular show The O.C. This phone interview was recorded while the band was driving in their van, and covers everything you’re wondering about this Missouri-based group.

 

Who: Philip Dickey; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Phil talks about the band, their recordings, Madison, and some other fun stuff
Where: Murfie HQ via skype; Madison, WI
When: Friday, October 11th, 2013
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Find music by SSLYBY in our shop.

Check out more of the band at sslyby.com.

Into RSS? Follow our podcast feed via http://blog.murfie.com/category/podcasts/feed.

AmyRay_credit John David Raper

Interview with Amy Ray

One of my favorite Murfie podcasts is the Amy Ray podcast. Not only did I have a great chat with her in the basement of The Frequency, surrounded by walls that are covered in thousands of band stickers, paintings, and initials, but I stuck around for her show—and it was rockin’! We even got her song “Glow” on video!

Here’s a transcript of that podcast from May 2012. Read on!

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast. I’m pleased to say that I got to meet Amy Ray when she came to town. You probably know her as part of the Indigo Girls, the award-winning folk-rock duo from Georgia. Now, she has a solo career to go alongside that, and a rockin’ new album called Lung of Love. Here’s a clip from the chat that we had before her show at The Frequency.

[MUSIC: “Glow” by Amy Ray]

Kayla: So I’m talking to Amy Ray right now, at The Frequency in downtown Madison. Welcome to Madison, first of all.

Amy: Thanks, I always love bein’ in Madison—always, always.

Kayla: Awesome. So you’re here debuting your new CD—you’re on tour for that. And for the past ten years, about, you’ve been going solo; so what’s that like after two decades with the Indigo Girls?

Amy: Well actually, I still do both, so it’s like, I started going solo around 2000 and just interspersing it with Indigo Girls stuff. And so, I mean, at first, it was kind of crazy because we Indigos were playing kind of big places and then when I started doing solo, I started just doing small clubs like The Frequency—which I’m still doing. So, it was kind of at first like I adjusted, and just learned how to— We drive ourselves, you know, fix my own amp, fix my guitars, you know, whatever needs to be done. And so, for me it’s like kind of, extremely DIY [laughs], is what it is, and Indigo Girls are extremely the other way. So, it’s like this great sort of thing that I just go back and forth between, and it gives me perspective on both things.

Kayla: Awesome. So, is it different putting out music nowadays, compared to the earlier days when you got started?

Amy: Yeah, ‘cause when we started, it was still, like, ’85. I mean, we started in ’80, but we were putting out music starting in ’85, and we were just out of high school. And we were doing cassettes—like how you made your friend mix tapes, we would make our little cassettes of our songs, and we did like a little vinyl single, and a little vinyl EP, and LP. Yeah, and college radio was a really big deal then, so that’s what you wanted: you wanted to get on college radio—and you still do, but now it’s harder. And um, you just had like a network—like in each city, you sort of had this network: you had the record store, the indie art paper, the college radio station, and the venue, and you tried to get all those things to kind of stick together. And that’s still what you should do, but like the difference now is that we have so many great tools—Facebook and Twitter and all these things—and ways to record music, and ways to get music out there, and everything’s cheaper. It’s either like, a really great thing, or it can be a really bad thing, but I think personally I like to look at it as a really great thing, cause I think it’s like tools that we can use to sort of get music out there, and cross-pollinate more, and share with our friends, and have music take its place as more of a community thing.

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