Murfie Staff Picks: August 2015 Edition

August is right around the corner. Are you listening to something new, or recycling some favorite albums from long ago? Our staff is doing a mix of both, and we have some music picks you should hear. For more staff picks, check out our Staff Picks Cool Collection, which we update often!

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Aja
Steely Dan
1977

“A genre-busing masterpiece.”
—Andrew

80280-largeDying to Say This to You
The Sounds
2006

“New Wave inspired Swedish band with a lead singer who sets a new bar for ‘bad ass’ with her stage presence.” —Steve

377178-largeNikki-Nack
tUnE-yArDs
2014

“Merrill Garbus is the master of weirdly-catchy & just-plain-weird pop songs, and Nikki Nack is her best work yet.” —John

418070-largeWormfood
Jamaican Queens
2013

“I recently saw these guys live at the Frequency and they were awesome. They are a unique electronic, pop/rock band from MI and they kill it!” —Nate

82739-largeOne Time for All Time
65daysofstatic
2005

“One Time for All Time is full of top-notch math rock instrumentals and unique beats, check out all of 65daysofstatic!” —Kael

51527-largeMarcus Garvey
Burning Spear
1975

“Powerful. A must-have in your roots reggae collection.” —Kayla

Interview with Red Wanting Blue [Podcast]

Red Wanting Blue is a rock n’ roll band from Columbus, Ohio. They’ve been making waves since 1996 with a steady output of albums and tours. Their frontman Scott Terry called in to the Murfie office recently to chat about the band’s experiences, including signing with a record label, and avoiding a near-fatal car crash that inspired their new album. We cover topics in the music industry of course, like transparency in the streaming business, and the paradox of choice that comes with infinite access. Scott is definitely a fan of music ownership and collecting physical music, and in fact, he points out how physical music can be an extension of your personality. He also embraces the amazing influence computers can have in creating music and reaching fans.

Here’s a transcript of our interview, along with the Soundcloud link below for your listening pleasure.

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Who: Scott Terry; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
When: Tuesday July 7th, 2015
How: via phone

K: I’ve got Scott Terry on the phone from the band Red Wanting Blue. And Scott, you just started your tour called the Our Little America Tour, how’s that going so far?

S: It’s going great, it’s going great. Actually right now we are in Columbus, Ohio, and we’re just now getting ready to make a trip up to Edmonton Alberta Canada. So we’ve got kind of a long way to go and a short time to get there.

K: Well this definitely isn’t the first time you’ve gone on a tour, and it’s going through the end of August, so I was wondering if you have any tips for going on tour, for a musician who hasn’t gone before. What do you do to get through?

S: You know what, it’s funny you say that because I have literally thought of writing a book, or like a short guide, for survival tips when you’re on the road with a rock n’ roll band. I don’t want to give away too much of my book. But I would say, if I had to give some tips to some young bands: try to avoid gas station restrooms. Usually there is a hotel off that same exit. They’re in the hospitality business, so they’re not gonna question you if you’re a guest at the hotel. You can just walk in and go straight to the lobby. That’s a Scott Terry survival tip, although we haven’t had to use that one in a little while. We’re fortunate, we’ve got a bathroom on our bus now. More important tips on the road would be: try to stay active. One of the things that we do is we try to avoid fast food, because I think it makes you feel bad. Even if it tastes good going down, you usually regret it a little bit later. Or a lot, depending. We also try to stay fit while we’re on the road. You’ve got a lot of downtime sometimes between load-in and sound check, and performing. So we’ll try to go for jogs and keep ourselves in shape, and so that’s a good thing to do. Again, I don’t want to dig too much into my stash of secrets.

K: We’ll have to keep a lookout for that book. You need to have your own hashtag, #ScottTerryTourTips. Well those are definitely helpful, staying active and eating right.

S: Yeah and it sounds lame to say it like that, but the truth is that—I don’t want to sound preachy—but we run across bands who live up to the illusion and the idea that a band that’s traveling, you know—rock n’ roll band, partying every night. At this point in my career, I think that’s a difficult thing to sustain, it’s hard to maintain that lifestyle and live like that. It’s good to cut loose every now and then, but I think ultimately, you’re going to be going from town to down, driving from cold weather conditions to hot weather conditions. You’re putting your body through a lot of sleepless nights and the schedule can be rigorous and brutal, and the best thing you can be doing for yourself in order to make it through the shows so that you’re not apologizing to your fans like “Sorry I have a sore throat, sorry I got sick,” is to—because the road will run you down, I mean it is longer than you, it will definitely run you down if you open yourself up to that—so the thing you have to try to keep in mind, is: pace yourself, and always try to stay on top of your health. That’s my fatherly tip to the young bands out there.

Red Wanting blue Little AmericaK: Right, coming from experience. I mean that’s great to hear. and you guys have experience touring, you have experience putting out a lot of albums, so I was wondering if you look back at everything you’ve done so far—I  know you have a new album out, but—considering everything, is there a certain album you’ve put out that you personally feel most connected to?

Continue reading Interview with Red Wanting Blue [Podcast]

DuckDuckGo: Because Your Privacy Matters on the Web

We recently stumbled across a search engine called DuckDuckGo. It’s a bit different than other search engines for one big reason: it doesn’t track you. Other search engines, including Google, pay close attention to the things you’re searching for and the places you go.

“I have nothing to hide”—you might be thinking. It’s not about having nothing to hide. It’s about privacy. That’s our freedom.

You can use “Bangs“ on DuckDuckGo to search terms directly within another website. They are stylized as an exclamation mark followed by the name of the website you want to search, followed by the keyword. Example: !zappos sandals.

And guess what, we made a Murfie Bang! So now you can search for Katy Perry albums without judgement (e.g. !Murfie Katy Perry).

Ready to try DuckDuckGo? Head over to their website and try out the search engine that doesn’t track you!

Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

DJ Pain 1DJ Pain 1 is a prominent hip-hop producer, and over the years he’s worked with names you know like Young Jeezy, Public Enemy and Ludacris. He’s also a Madison local and active community member who volunteers for non-profits. We had the great pleasure of having him here at the Murfie office recently.

In this interview, he brings up some important topics—like the pressure that Madison police put on venues that try to book hip-hop shows. Unfortunately, the lack of hip-hop in Madison makes it hard for talented acts to really blossom in town. What you might not know about DJ Pain 1 is that his real name is Pacal Bayley. He’s a true lover of all dedicated musicians, a physical music collector, and a mushroom hunter—although he’ll never tell you where he finds morels.

Now, I don’t want to give away all the best parts. Here’s a transcript of our interview along with the recorded version (below) on our Soundcloud player.

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Who: DJ Pain 1; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
Where: Murfie HQ, Madison, WI
When: Wednesday July 1st, 2015

K: So I am currently in one of the Murfie warehouse rooms surrounded by discs with DJ Pain 1. Welcome to the office, first of all.

DJ: This is kind of surreal.

K: It is. Being surrounded by so much music kind of makes you think about all the albums that have come out over the years.

DJ: Well all I see is boxes, so I’m just smelling cardboard—and there are all these boxes with numbers written on all of them. It’s like musical coffins or something.

K: That’s one way to think about it, for the people who store their CDs here. We do have people who get their CDs digitized and shipped back to them. But I suppose it is a good resting place, and these boxes are actually like water resistant and temperature—

DJ: Oh they are?

K: Yeah we make sure everything stays nice and cozy in there. But you know there are a lot of things to talk about in music, especially someone like you who is involved on all these different levels. So over the years as you’ve gained all your experience, the music industry has changed a lot, especially recently, in terms of the way people listen to music, and the way it’s being released. So in your opinion, is the music industry changing for better or for worse?

DJ: I think it’s always a duality. I think access is a good thing, and access has been improving for decades now. And so what access begets is saturation. And of course it changes the landscape as far as fans are concerned and their expectations of artists. They expect a lot of music, and they expect instant access, and they expect free most of all. And so that’s not necessary a bad thing, because it’s forced artists to really adapt in new and innovative ways, whether it’s just challenging the traditions of a genre or finding new and exciting ways to market and promote themselves. So, it’s good for some and bad for others, I guess that’s a subjective question. And I don’t necessarily know, because I’m benefiting a lot from it—but then on a macro level the music industry is just kind of crumbling before my very eyes. At first that kind of scared me, but now I’m just sitting there looking at my watch waiting for it to happen, because I kind of can’t stand the paradigm. But it also every now and then lets me in through a door, and then I make some money and get some notoriety off it.

DJ Pain 1K: Well I like what you said about finding ways to adapt that are new and interesting. I feel like that’s gonna be the differentiator between people who succeed regardless of how the music industry ends up being. So what are some of the best ways that you’ve learned to connect with your audience and make a living?

DJ: I give a lot of stuff away for free. And maybe the ratio is somewhere around 10:1 or 15:1. 15 being what I give away and 1 being what I sell. It gives me more leverage for the people that are following me and benefiting from the resources I give out. So I don’t know if it works, but it’s worked for me in some capacity, so I’m going to keep doing it.

K: Well especially if your music is good and people like it.

DJ: Yeah with me I really speak more to the producer community, so: free resources for producers, a lot of video advice for just aspiring artists of all kinds, and streaming Q&A shows, panels, the professional development stuff that we do locally here. I’ve done it around the country too a little.

K: So you’ve seen Madison’s music scene, and you’ve also traveled to different places. How does Madison’s music scene compare to other places?

DJ: That goes back to the word access. I’m gonna use Appleton as an example just because it’s so close and it’s so much smaller than Madison. I mean, their population is a lot smaller than Madison’s. You know alone we have 40,000+ just students, just like a transient population, but Appleton has more venues, more music events going on concurrently, more music festivals, and just it seems that there’s more access. And I know that things have changed maybe in the last year or two, but when I go there it appears to me that they have more going on. When you come to Madison there are very few options as far as live music goes, and especially if you’re a fan of what people would consider—quote urban unquote—styles of music. That’s unfortunate. Because I mean the talent here isn’t any less amazing. And I’ve been all over the place and we have great talent here. But I think access and opportunity not only allows for sustainability, but it also promotes talent too, and growth too. I mean people feel boxed in here, so I don’t think we’re all growing as much as we could be.

K: You know, when you say that, I do realize I haven’t seen a lot of hip-hop and rap shows being promoted.

DJ: No they’re all banned, it’s banned. Name a venue and I’m probably banned from it.

K: Really! Majestic? Frequency?

Continue reading Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

Audiophile Forums, Vol. 2

Forums are among the most useful resources out there. Technology and music are huge topics that audiophiles feel passionate about, so as you might guess, there are a ton of interesting discussions happening online.

We love finding out when our members spread the word about Murfie in forums. It’s fun to see ourselves named as leaders in cloud storage, FLAC music, CD ripping, low album prices and lossless streaming, As a growing company, we appreciate your support!

In our previous article we recommended Head-Fi, Hydrogenaud.io, SteveHoffman.tv and ComputerAudiophile for music lovers. This time we’re recommending four more, which would be wise to check out!

►StereoNET

News, reviews and info about Hi-Fi, Audio-Visual and consumer electronics.

►Reddit Audiophile

Trending audiophile topics ordered by popularity.

►AudioAsylum

An independent, user-supported resource about all things audio.

►AudiogoN

Music, speakers, digital, analog and more.

Stream the Monterey Pop Festival

….just use a little imagination!

It’s June 16th, 1967. You’re 20 years old, and you bought a ticket to the Monterey Pop Festival in California.

With the right soundtrack, you can imagine being there for three days of psychedelic music and fun, without feeling like a packed sardine.

The festival lineup was quite astounding. Bands like The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Jefferson Airplane were in their heyday when the Monterey Pop Festival took place. Here are some albums that can bring you back to those days in the Summer of Love, with nothing but music on your mind. Most are available for just a few dollars, ready to stream and download!

Monterey Pop Festival Ticket

Friday, June 16th, 1967

The Association – psychedelic folk, sunshine pop

The Association

The Association

The Association

 

 

 

 

 

Lou Rawls – R&B, soul, blues, jazz

Lou RawlsLou RawlsLou Rawls

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Burdon & The Animals – blues rock, psychedelic rock

Eric BurdonEric Burdon songs The AnimalsThe Animals

 

 

 

 

 

Simon & Garfunkel – folk rock

Simon & GarfunkelSimon & garfunkelSimon & garfunkel

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 17th, 1967

Continue reading Stream the Monterey Pop Festival

Buy FLAC music

Look no further.

Murfie might be the largest and most diverse source of FLAC music online. Every album in our marketplace is a real CD that we rip in FLAC format and send to you digitally. We’re not like other FLAC download websites—the music you’re downloading is from physical CDs you really own. The music will remain yours as long as you wish, available for future downloads and even FLAC streaming.

How to buy FLAC music on Murfie

1. Create a free account.

2. Shop the marketplace. Sort by genre, search artists and album names, and check out our cool collections of albums.

3. Buy your album.

Fill in your billing details if you haven’t already, and your info will be saved for future purchases. We accept US credit cards, PayPal, and Bitcoin.

Murfie

4. Go to your collection and search for the album, or click “Recent Activity” on the left sidebar of your collection.

Murfie

5. Click “Delivery Options” next to the album. Choose FLAC in the drop-down menu and click “Request Download”.

Murfie FLAC download

Your download will arrive via email. You can also click “Downloads” on the left sidebar of your collection to see when your downloads are ready. Here are FAQs about downloading music on Murfie.

Helpful tip: Stream the album before you request a download, to make sure you really like it. Because if you don’t, simply return the album within 24 hours for full credit back to your account. Here are FAQs about Murfie streaming.

As you can see, it’s easy to buy FLAC music on Murfie. In addition to getting lossless audio, you get to own your music, and that can’t be beat.