Manic Mondays Hit Murfie HQ

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If your feeling like the Bangles, struggling with the manic Monday blues and live in the Madison area, why not let Murfie help take some of the load. The load, in this case, is your physical CD collection that has been sitting in your home gathering dust.

You love your music collection right! And let’s face it, you have invested plenty of your hard-earned money into it over the years,  And those CDs;  they sound so good on your home system.  But times have changed and digital formats now prevail leaving you with fewer ways to enjoy the music in your collection.  This where the Murfie team wants to help you bring the love back to your CD collection!

Murfie is offering local residents in the Madison area the chance to reclaim their CD collections by taking advantage of our Manic Monday events hosted each Monday evening throughout the fall season.

All you need to do is just show up at our HQ with your CD collection, where one of our dedicated Murfie team members will guide you through the 5 minute process of  purchasing one of our yearly subscription packages that will enable us to digitize your whole CD collection (without any additional digitization fee) so that you can join the thousands of like-minded music lovers who are once again enjoying their own personal music collections streamed in lossless CD quality (not compressed, lossy, mp3 streaming as offered by other music services) using the Murfie web player on their computer or by using our mobile phone App.

What makes Manic Mondays at Murfie such a hit for Madison residents is the huge saving in shipping and digitization costs. Residents outside of Madison pay to ship their discs to Murfie HQ and once they reach their initial free digitization cap (100 or 200 discs depending on the subscription package they choose; $99 per year for Platinum or $149 for 2 X Platinum year) then they are charged $0.20 per disc thereafter.

As an extra special bonus, Murfie is also giving away (to anyone who delivers their CD collection and joins one of the Murfie subscription plans on any upcoming Manic Monday) a free hardback copy (first come, first served, while stocks last) of the recently published book “To Feel the Music” by Neil Young and Phil Baker. The book is an insight into Neil Young’s efforts to bring a complete high-quality listening experience to all music fans, a philosophy that is shared by everyone here at Murfie!

So join us for one of the upcoming manic Monday events hosted at Murfie HQ, 821 East Washington Ave, Madison, WI, 53703 between 6 pm – 8 pm and let Murfie help you to fall in love with your music collection once again.

Upcoming Manic Monday Events

Monday 28th October, Murfie HQ (6 pm-8 pm)

 

Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash

Murfie is Moving (Again)!

With over 750,000 CDs in the Murfie warehouse, the time has come for the company to relocate to bigger digs!

It’s been truly enjoyable having Murfie on Madison’s Capitol Square surrounded by fantastic companies and people. However, Murfie has simply outgrown the space! With the amount of physical music being sent in to be digitized and stored, the best solution was to find a warehouse where there’s plenty of room for the growing amount of CDs and vinyl….plus all the Murfie staffers of course!

Murfie is moving to Middleton, Wisconsin, in the old Full Compass building. Full Compass is a Madison-based music company as well. The new neighborhood is looking beautiful as can be, and the staff is relieved to be able to keep all of Murfie operations under one spacious roof.

Starting today, Murfie will begin to move all inventory to the new Middleton warehouse, which will continue for 1-2 weeks. In the meantime, you can still access your music digitally, so no worries there!

Murfie has a new focus of maintaining the largest and most diverse source of lossless music on the web.  So—see you on the other side, in Middleton!

– The Murfie Crew

Murfie, Inc.
8001 Terrace Ave, Suite 201
Middleton, WI 53562

 

Murfie and The River Food Pantry

Murfie is running a charity event for The River Food Pantry in Madison!

From November 15th to December 15th, donate used or new CDs or DVDs to Murfie. For each CD and DVD, Murfie will purchase one pound of fresh produce for the River Food Pantry on your behalf. Drop off your donations at Murfie HQ (7 N. Pinckney Street, Suite 300, Madison) or at The River Food Pantry at 2201 Darwin Rd in Madison.

Not in the Madison area? Ship your donations to Murfie, or make a direct donation on The River Food Pantry’s website!

Open since 2006, The River Food Pantry has been working to provide hot meals, clothing, groceries, and household items to low-income families in Dane County. In 2012, The River provided items to about 28,811 Dane County families, or about 81,386 individuals. That includes 30,163 children.

Help us make a difference! Drop off your donations through December 15th, and contact us if we can help you figure out the best way to contribute.

Xconomy’s Curt Woodward has a point…

Curt Woodward reviewed Murfie for Xconomy, and found some areas we need to work on.

First of all, I want to thank Curt for his review. It’s a thorough, fair, and objective take on Murfie from fresh eyes. Good stuff. Some bits of it make me cringe, but we find that sort of thing motivating – we’re obsessed with getting better.

This post is a reaction to and apology for the part of the piece that makes me cringe, and in coming days I’ll also write up some good news for Curt and anyone considering Murfie. Things already in the pipeline address some of his other points – we’re giving greater ease and flexibility for sending in discs, and improving our music player interfaces.

On to Curt’s experience. Anyone can shop at Murfie and buy new discs, customer accounts are free. That said, our core service for music collectors involves importing their existing CD collections and hosting them in Murfie’s cloud. That is a service members pay for. Curt’s review of Murfie therefore included trying that out by sending in a 25 CD kit, with which we gave out an automatic Gold Membership, and that’s where the trouble started.

Curt’s kit experience was far from ideal, and had one key frustration – he didn’t know yet if he wanted an ongoing membership at all, and yet he couldn’t opt out of the one we include with a kit. Since our memberships auto-renew by default and we handle subscription changes via our support desk, this constituted in Curt’s review an “insistence on getting me locked into an annual membership” with “no way to turn off the auto-renew on the Murfie website.”

OK. Yeah. Hmmm. I can’t disagree with that, and it does suck. It makes me feel bad that Curt found our service dodgy in this way, and he’s right to find it overly aggressive. We got this wrong. We should not ‘force’ an auto-renewing membership on someone who sends in a kit, or in fact at all. It’s also not reasonable at this stage in Murfie’s growth to have this be something customers can’t manage on the website.

Therefore, I apologize to Curt and every Murfie member for the lack of control on this up til now, and we’re going to do a few things to fix it:

1. We’ll clarify what paid membership is required for, and how many discs you can send in for free with one

2. We’ll make any membership that comes with a package or kit something you can decline

3. We’ll switch auto-renewal to an opt in anywhere a member buys or accepts a membership, add controls on the website for changing that setting, and keep the current warnings of upcoming renewal

We got here because our member collection hosting products are high touch and often involve some discussion with our customer. As we’ve grown we’ve always handled a lot of things via our support desk, because we have the greatest flexibility and agility that way, where we do our damnedest to satisfy each customer on any request. In this case that and our desire to make subscribing the default to help us grow led us astray. We should have added more user-control to subscription renewal a while ago, and we’ll do it now. I’ll let you and Curt know when it’s done.

Thanks,
Preston – Murfie Co-Founder

photo credit: hannah k

The bookshelf is dead! Long live the bookshelf!

This post belongs to Murfie Musings–a series where folks at Murfie and our guests take the time to share what Murfie is up to as well as explore issues that matter to media ecology.

I have a fascination with the ways in which people create and experience media, and the financial transactions that support these value creating activities. Lately, I spend a lot of time staring at bookshelves full of books, CDs, magazines, DVDs. I call this stuff “flatmedia” – not only because it’s basically two-dimensional, but also because my experience of it is flat relative to what I’ve come to expect from digital versions on networked devices from web browser to iPod to Android to Kindle.

This is not a niche concern – most of the owned media in the world, by an enormous margin, is flatmedia that someone purchased at some point and currently owns. Virtually all of the accrued equity in media in the world exists in flatmedia form. It’s a collective repository of our culture on shelves in homes, libraries, archives, and used book and record shops. These copies we own, plus the unique rights we have to use them as we see fit, are the very reasons why we have any say over how we experience major parts of our often copyrighted culture.

But right now, we’re on a course to give all of that up. Our flatmedia infrastructure is slowly dying, many if not most new and used book shops and record stores will close as they can’t offer the new digital services folks want. As the ecology of flatmedia is displaced, but not replaced, the world of digital media is growing. In that world, the music and book buyer has no strong legal ownership rights to the digital copy of the product they buy, if they even have a copy, and their experiences and flexibility are vendor-controlled. Often, this control is used to subject them to marketing or other manipulation. This is fine for many folks, but many are not happy with the trend, and it drives otherwise lawful people into quasi-legal and illegal niches to get legitimate needs met.

I feel that liberty of experience and the use of one’s personal property and tools is an intrinsic good. Copyright and other legal and cultural norms surrounding flatmedia give us a lot of liberty with personal copies, and this mostly happened because it creates value for the rights holder and copy owner alike. Today we have this liberty in a million little ways. One such easily accomplished liberty is that I can loan a book to Julie, who can then allow her mom to read part of it, and then give it back to me. I don’t need an account or permission or a feature to do that. I can also put some of her CDs in my car legally. Books and movies that I don’t want anymore are material property with real value, and that property can be sold or traded at used shops or online. I can get some money for new CDs while making used ones available to people who could not or would not buy full-price music.

That’s part of why, starting with CDs, Murfie seeks to upgrade our members’ flatmedia from their bookshelf to the digital world and protect both their existing rights and their material property. We’re the friendly platform for media owners with an approach that respects artists’ rights and needs and offers them services and direct access to our marketplace. We want artists to sell lots of new music on Murfie. We also respect the rights and needs of those who support and facilitate artists, like labels, publishers, distributors, and in fact new and used retail stores. These groups are not obsolete – they have all sorts of value-creating power and we’re happy to partner with them. Murfie will list and sell every new title we can find in CD format, and we’ll continue reaching out to labels to find other ways to work together.

While we do this, we’ll always respect and protect the rights, needs and desires of our members. Ultimately, it’s the music listeners, the movie watchers and the book readers who provide the revenue that makes the creative ecology tick, and Murfie’s here to help.

Suggested Reading
https://blog.murfie.com/2011/11/29/music-ownership-vs-streaming/
https://blog.murfie.com/2011/10/08/music-tastes-change/
https://blog.murfie.com/2011/09/23/its-the-hard-knock-life-for-artists-online/
https://blog.murfie.com/2011/09/11/music-not-on-itunes/
https://blog.murfie.com/2011/06/23/the-cloud-music/

Murfie Musings–a new series of thoughtful posts about Murfie

Murfie seeks to be the friendly media ownership platform. In these posts we talk about what it means to us to respect the stakeholders in the media ecology, and how Murfie is doing it. We discuss our thinking, implementation, and plans for rights holders and collection owners alike to sell new and used media backed by material objects you can hold in your hand. We talk about how and where we seek to improve digital access by owners and partners via the services and APIs we provide. We’ll provide information about our design and how it performs to discourage infringing and illegal use cases, and we’ll want to hear everyone’s concerns. We want to bring attention to the evolution of copyright and its impact on people within creative industries: musicians, producers and writers, to name a few. We’ll talk about where we would like to see the law and market go to increase healthy cooperation and competition among vendors, increase prosperity and exposure for professional creators, and foster both great consumer experiences and broadened opportunity to create and contribute for everyone.

Disc Drive for Charity at Madison Holiday Happy Hour

Got Discs? Sell & trade them on Murfie and help Goodman Community Center!

Box of compact discsIf you have music on compact discs you don’t play anymore Murfie will donate $1 to the center for every 10 music CDs you bring to the event for us to list on murfie.com. We’re donating to charity on your behalf, but your discs still belong to you, we just load them into a new murfie.com account for you to sell and trade for cash and new music. We offer a variety of delivery formats for new music you buy or trade for on Murfie.

We’ll collect an email address along with your discs and contact you after we list them. Murfie is currently in private beta so we’ll send you an invite after the event – but you can watch this video or read more about how murfie.com works today. Key point is that it is risk free, if you don’t love selling or trading on Murfie, we’ll ship your discs back to you on request free of charge.

Murfie Disc Drive DropoffSo turn music collecting dust into cash & music you love while helping the Goodman Center. Bring that box or caselogic folder full of discs from the attic, closet, or shelf where they’re hiding and come enjoy a drink at imby.info‘s Holiday Happy Hour fundraiser. It’s on Wednesday, Dec 15, between 5 and 7:30*

Update: you can also drop discs off earlier that day at our offices in downtown Madison: 1 South Pinckney St, Suite 818 in the US Bank building