#FreeFriday: American Beauty

It’s #FreeFriday, y’all! Here’s a little giveaway to end the week.

For a chance to win today’s featured album, all you gotta do is read this post, then share it on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share the link on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #FreeFriday
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share today’s #FreeFriday Facebook post

Be sure your social settings are on public so we can see your post! Enough details. Now on to the album we’re giving away…

Grateful Dead American BeautyAmerican Beauty (Grateful Dead, 1970)

The Grateful Dead are one of those bands. Some people love ’em and some hate ’em. I feel you need to hear the right song of theirs at the right time to get hooked. And once you’re hooked…it’s for life. American Beauty is The Dead’s sixth album, and possibly one of the band’s most popular. Stylistically it’s similar to Workingman’s Dead, which they released just a few months prior in 1970, because it channels the same elements of country, rock, and folk.

The first chords on track 1, “Box of Rain”, stir up images of driving down Highway 1 on a sunny day with the windows down. It’s a feel-good tune that sets the tone of the entire album, with plenty of acoustic guitar and easygoing harmonies. Track 2 is a fantastic song about an outlaw called “Friend of the Devil”, with the lyrics being the strongpoint, in my opinion. “I set out running but I take my time / A friend of the devil is a friend of mine / If I get home before daylight / I just might get some sleep tonight.”

Other stand-out tracks to me are “Ripple”, a song with a storytelling layout, “Brokedown Palace”, a slow country anthem, and “Till the Morning Comes”, a ’70s rock gem. “Attics of My Life” is another great one that’s a testament to The Dead’s surreal topics. The lyrics are amazing. “In the secret space of dreams, where I dreaming lay amazed / When the secrets all are told, and the petals all unfold.” The album closes out with the upbeat song “Truckin'” which boasts the very popular Dead lyric “What a long strange trip it’s been.”

American Beauty is a must-have in your collection if you love ’70s rock, and it’s a great place to start if you’re not familiar with the Grateful Dead yet. Time to get on the bus, man! ;)

Share this post in one of the ways listed above, and we’ll let you know if you won the album on Saturday! There can be more than one winner! Best of luck. :)

#FreeFriday: Odelay

How about a giveaway to round out the week? Alas…it’s #FreeFriday!

For a chance to win today’s featured album, all you gotta do is read this post, then share it on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share the link on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #FreeFriday
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share today’s #FreeFriday Facebook post

Be sure your social settings are on public so we can see your post! Enough details. Now on to the album we’re featuring!

Beck Odelay

Odelay (Beck, 1996)

Beck may have recently won a GRAMMY for his 2014 album Morning Phase, but his old accomplishments are still fresh in the minds of those who remember the most innovative 90s alternative rock.

Odelay, Beck’s 2nd studio album, is considered one of the best albums of all time. After it was released, it won Rolling Stone‘s Album of the Year, ranked number 306 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and number 9 on their 100 best albums of the nineties list. It won a Grammy for Best Alternative Music Album and was also nominated for Album of the Year.

There is something in Odelay for everyone. There are genre-bending compositions that tap into such sounds as grunge rock, old-school rap, folk, and electronic. The album is mostly upbeat, with a few mellow moments to keep you grounded. Some tracks that stand out to me are the upbeat hits “Devil’s Haircut” and “The New Pollution”, the southern hip-hoppy “Hotwax”, the epic “Novacane”, and the amazing groovy “Where It’s At”. When you listen to this album, there is never a dull moment.

Beck’s lyrical skills are outstanding. He uses flawless rhymes that are full of imagery and irony, delivered primarily with his rapping vocal style. He uses samples and distorted sound effects that in the end sound harmonious.

I’m going to go ahead and say Beck is pure musical genius. Odelay is a must-have album in your collection.

Share this post in one of the ways listed above, and we’ll let you know if you won the album on Monday! There can be more than one winner! Best of luck. :)

Wishy Wednesday at Murfie

Let me start by saying, Murfie is the place where dreams come true. ;-)

We want to fulfill some of your wishes. Add albums to your Murfie Wishlist on a Wednesday (i.e. today), and you might just find those albums in your collection the next day. It’s as simple as that!

No tweeting or posting needed, no sharing URLs, no hassle at all. We’re trying something new this time, because we can. :-)

Now get wishin’!

Throwback Thursday Album Giveaway

Is there a Throwback Thursday album you want to see in your collection? We want to make your wish come true!

This blog post marks the ultimate fusion of two awesome things: Murfie Wishlists and Throwback Thursday. Tell us which Throwback Thursday album you miss, that you’d like to own again. You might just find that album in your inbox as a gift!

We only ask one thing in return—tell us what you love about the album! It could be a story about when you used to listen to the album, or how you found that band. Maybe you used to listen to the album with your parents, or it reminds you of spring break your freshman year.

Here’s how to give yourself a chance to get your album gift:

1. Add the album to your Murfie Wishlist
2. Tweet @murfiemusic or comment on our Facebook post with a link to the album
3. Share your story! Tell us in your tweet, or below the Facebook post!

You might just find your wish fulfilled tomorrow. Cheers! :)

Jagged Little Pill
Alanis has been throwin’ it back since ’95.

#FreeFriday: Legend

Time for our fourth edition of #FreeFriday! Each week we’ll review an album, and give it away to one lucky winner. For a chance to win the album, all you have to do is read this post, then share on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share this blog post on Twitter—use the hashtag #FreeFriday and tag @murfiemusic
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share our #FreeFriday Facebook post (in a public post)

Now, on to this week’s featured album…

Bob Marley & the Wailers - LegendLegend (Bob Marley & the Wailers, 1984)

Legend is an incredible album that can easily be the catalyst for a lifetime love of reggae music. One of the most widely distributed reggae albums in the world, Legend showcases a variety of songs by the foundational roots reggae band Bob Marley & the Wailers.

This “Best Of” collection came about after the band had established themselves as international roots reggae rockers. It was released after the departure of Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer from the band (Bob, Peter, and Bunny were the forefront of the group) and after Bob’s untimely death due to cancer. By the time this tracklist was put together, the I-Threes had been added to the band as backup vocalists (Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt and Marcia Griffiths, each successful solo artists in their own right), and for that reason you get a wide variety of recordings. For this album, the curator chose the band’s later recordings which have a popular appeal to people who generally enjoy rock n’ roll, soul, and R&B. (This can be contrasted to the earlier, more Rocksteady years, when the band worked with the incredibly genius, and slightly mad producer, Lee “Scratch” Perry).

Legend contains everything from uplifting, radiantly positive roots reggae songs like “Is This Love” and “One Love” to the more disco and dance-oriented “Could You Be Loved.” It contains the lighthearted acoustic ballad “Redemption Song” and the heavy, protest-themed “Get Up Stand Up” featuring Peter Tosh’s militant-sounding vocals. This album made me fall in love with the vast, deep diverse ocean of reggae music, and I know you will love it too.

Share this post in one of the ways listed above for a chance to win a copy of Legend, and we’ll let you know if you’re the winner next week! Good luck!


Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


#FreeFriday: The Rhumb Line

Time for our third edition of #FreeFriday! Each week we’ll review an album, and give it away to one lucky winner. For a chance to win the album, all you have to do is read this post, then share on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share this blog post on Twitter—use the hashtag #FreeFriday and tag @murfiemusic
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share our #FreeFriday Facebook post (in a public post)

Now, on to this week’s featured album…

Ra Ra Riot - The Rhumb Line

The Rhumb Line (Ra Ra Riot, 2008)

Different doesn’t necessarily mean good. I once tried to convince my friends that my root vegetable pancakes would taste awesome, but found that significant twists on traditional methods should be handled with great care (and much less allspice). When Ra Ra Riot decided to mix up the standard pop/rock recipe and layer cello and violin over a standard four-piece, they too faced the challenge of overcoming the ground-in tastes of tradition, but their results were much more tasteful than my heavy-handed attempt at making a meal of cupboard scraps when I should have just gone to the grocery store.

The Rhumb Line, Ra Ra Riot’s first full-length release, is a beautiful mélange of seemingly contradictory flavors. Frontman Wes Miles’ voice is equally well suited for dramatically stretching notes (like on “Oh, La”) as it is for playfully harmonizing with the bands’ several backup singers as it does on “Ghost Under Rocks”. He also has just the voice for covering Kate Bush‘s single “Suspended in Gaffa.” One would expect the 80’s basslines of “Run My Mouth” and synth riffs of “Too Too Too Fast” to clash with the classical elements of the band, but instead their rhythm creates a wonderful background for the sweeping strings that drive most of their songs. It’s a wonder that there’s any room left for different accents with all these tastes on the listener’s palate, but Ra Ra dares to blend in some rock and roll undertones with an electric guitar and a well-handled drum kit. The overall result is a delectable chamber pop dish infused with contemporary indie rock.

Connoisseurs of the genre may already know the group for their involvement with independent superstars Vampire Weekend. Wes Miles joined with VW’s keyboardist Rostam Batmanglij in 2005 to form Discovery, an excellent electronic group that unfortunately only has one LP to their name. He was also childhood friends with lead singer Ezra Koenig and even starred in a short film Koenig made in college.

If you haven’t heard it already, you should definitely give The Rhumb Line a listen. It’s a nice treat for springtime, and who can argue with free music?

Share this post in one of the ways listed above for a chance to win a copy of The Rhumb Line, and we’ll let you know if you’re the winner next week! Good luck!


Andrew Hinkens

Andrew works in Operations at Murfie, taking great care to make sure all your albums are ripped quickly and accurately. He enjoys collecting vinyl, going to concerts, longboarding, and playing with just about any dog he can get close to.