Caroline Smith Interview

Caroline SmithMy first interaction with Caroline Smith was way back in July 2012, when her band still went by Caroline Smith & the Good Night Sleeps. Caroline and her bassist Jesse Schuster agreed to record an interview during a house show in Madison, and the entire night was a lot of fun!

Over the past two years, Caroline developed a different style. The release of her 2013 album Half About Being a Woman marked a departure from her indie rock outfit to a more soulful sound. In my opinion, the new direction suits her well. It’s fun, and it’s completely genuine. It’s 100% Caroline.

From the beginning, I certainly knew she was talented—heck, that’s why I asked her to do a Murfie podcast. But ever since she tapped into her soulful roots, I’ve become really hooked on her music and current collaborations. In April of this year, we caught up again for another Murfie podcast, before her show with Dessa at The Majestic. The audio version is a lot of fun, but I’ve transcribed most of it below for your reading pleasure!


K: Right now I’m at Ancora Coffee in downtown Madison with Caroline Smith over here sipping her coffee.

C: Hi!

K: Thanks for meeting me! You mentioned you just drove here from Rochester, Minnesota, not Rochester, New York. So how are things in Minnesota?

C: Things are really great in Minnesota right now. I mean, if we’re just talking lifestyle-wise, the snow is finally gone, so life can begin again. People can start to smile again. But for us musically—for my band in Minnesota, things are better than ever. The regional music scene is just bar-none.

K: I’ve found a lot of bands now—I don’t think this has to do with the fact that we’re in Wisconsin—but Minnesota seems to be a hub for music now.

C: Yeah!

K: All kinds of music. Hip-hop….

C: Mm-hmm.

Half About Being a WomanK: Indie rock, stuff like that. I like the new direction that your album, Half About Being a Woman, is going in.

C: Thank you!

K: It’s kind of soul, R&B. The first few seconds of the first song, you know that something, something different is going down…

C: Something has changed, yes!

K: So tell me a bit about the evolution of your music—is this something you always saw coming, something that you always wanted to try?

Continue reading Caroline Smith Interview

This Week in Music History (May 28th-June 3rd)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

Oops I did it again5/28- On this day in 2000, Britney Spears topped the new millenium’s album chart with Oops!…I Did It Again. The album sold 1,319,000 copies in its first week and went on to reach No.1 in thirteen other countries. To date, it has sold over 20 million copies.

365447-large5/29- On this day in 1942, Bing Crosby recorded the Irving Berlin song “White Christmas” with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra and the Ken Darby Singers. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Crosby’s version is the best-selling single of all time, with sales to date topping 50 million.

Beatles5/30- On this day in 1964, The Beatles‘ single “Love Me Do” reached No.1 on the US singles chart, the group’s fourth US No.1 in five months’ time. Although the single was originally released in the United Kingdom in October 1962, it did not become a hit in the United States until 1964.

114141-large5/31- On this day in 1977, The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) announced a ban on the new Sex Pistols single “God Save the Queen”. Although the single reached No.2 on the UK chart, the BBC declared it to be “in gross bad taste” and considered it to be an assault on Queen Elizabeth II and the monarchy. Lead singer Johnny Rotten, however, explained, “You don’t write ‘God Save the Queen’ because you hate the English race. You write a song like that because you love them and you’re fed up with them being mistreated.”

32093-large6/1- On this day in 1968, Simon & Garfunkel went to No.1 on the US singles chart with “Mrs. Robinson”. An early version of the song was featured in the film The Graduate, starring Dustin Hoffmann and Ann Bancroft. It was then re-recorded to be released as a single, which went on to win the duo a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

7400-large6/2- On this day in 1984, British duo Wham! had their first No.1 hit with “Wake Me Up Before You Go Go”. The song was written and produced by British musician George Michael, who was one half of the duo. Michael’s inspiration for the song was a note his Wham! partner Andrew Ridgeley had left for his parents which read “Wake me up up before you go go”.

13293-large6/3- On this day in 1967, soul legend Aretha Franklin hit No.1 on the US singles chart with her cover of Otis Redding‘s hit song “Respect”. Although the two versions were musically very similar, Aretha’s version added the famous R-E-S-P-E-C-T chorus and backup singers’ refrain of “Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me…”

Find these musical gems in our CD marketplace, and own your own pieces of music history! Every album purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC. :-)

Interview with Caroline Smith [Podcast]

photo credit: Reginald Van Nurden

Caroline Smith is a singer and songwriter who will not hesitate to point out how the music she creates, like herself, changes over time. Her sound could previously be clearly defined as indie rock, but a whole new world opened up to her when she covered the song “Drown in My Own Tears” by Aretha Franklin. Her new album Half About Being a Woman is a modern neo-soul/R&B/indie rock gem, young-spirited yet mature. As a woman in the music biz, Caroline has dealt with challenges. This interview was recorded before her show with Dessa at the Majestic Theatre, and it contains valuable insights about those challenges, and also advice for up-and-coming musicians.

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Who: Caroline Smith; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Caroline talks about influences, the Minnesota music scene, and the world of a difference that two years can make
Where: Ancora Coffee, Madison, WI
When: Thursday, April 10th, 2014
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Find music by Caroline Smith in our shop.

Checkout more at carolinesmithcarolinesmith.com.

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Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


Sounds Like New Jersey: The Best of the Garden State

Last time, we brought you the best albums Colorado has to offer. This time, let’s head east to check out the best of the Garden State. Here are reviews of three albums by Jersey natives!

Bruce Springsteen
Born to Run

After two low-budget albums, The Boss released his third, Born to Run, with a superstar budget and big aspirations. Before this album, Springsteen was mostly propelled by local love and word of mouth; Born to Run was a make-or-break shot at the big leagues.

It couldn’t be more successful at this mission—Born to Run is a superb album that cemented Springsteen’s status as someone who would make his mark on rock & roll. Each track is full of both drama and familiar themes of American life. The songs are familiar stories, told in a new way that’s an unprecedented level of exciting and meaningful.

Most important, though, is that The Boss just makes music that’s what rock should be. Each track is filled with incredible instrumentals: harmonicas, pianos, organs, great guitar lines and fantastic chords—and it’s all tied together by an unshakable spirit and energy. Born to Run is an exhilarating listening experience.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Born to Run”, “Thunder Road”, “Backstreets”

Lauryn Hill
The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill

Turns out 1998 was one amazing year for hip hop: between Outkast’s Aquemini, Talib Kweli and Mos Def’s Black Star, and Lauryn Hill, it was truly a year to remember. Even in a year of standouts, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill raised the bar. Hill’s hip-hop foundation with gospel, soul, reggae and funk layered on top made it the stellar album that won a record five Grammy Awards.

Hill’s music truly sounds like poetry, which, given its subject matter, is definitely appropriate. The album takes on the issue of love in many manifestations, ranging from deep happiness on tracks like “Nothing Even Matters” to sadness on “I Used to Love Him”. Rapper Nas described the album’s style as “the soul of Roberta Flack, the passion of Bob Marley, the essence of Aretha Franklin all wrapped up in one thing”.

What’s best about this album is that Hill created her own sound. Rather than trying to emulate existing hip-hop, she forged her own path—a brand new style. This album feels like a new artist—and genre—is born.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Doo Wop”, “Superstar”

Bon Jovi
Slippery When Wet

It’s impossible to talk about New Jersey without mentioning Jon Bon Jovi and crew. Listening to this album reminds you of every party you’ve been at when “Livin’ on a Prayer” comes on, and suddenly you’re singing along. This band has a way of sticking in your mind.

Bon Jovi may love his lyrical clichés, but there’s no denying how much fun this music is. In its best moments, like “Livin on a Prayer” or “Wanted Dead or Alive”, Slippery When Wet creates a melodic frenzy. The album introduces an appealing fusion of pop, rock and metal that brought hair metal onto the mainstream radio. Despite its metal influences, however, this album is most true to pop.

“It’s alright if you have a good time”, Bon Jovi sang on “Let it Rock”, and that’s the theme of this album: it’s an accessible, middle-of-the-road approach to rock that deviated from other hard-edged ‘80s music and created an appealing, carefree alternative that ultimately became an ‘80s soundtrack.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Livin’ on a Prayer”, “Wanted Dead or Alive”

These albums currently range from $1 to $4 on Murfie. Grab ’em now!

This Week in Music History (June 26th-July 2nd)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

8277-large6/26- On this day in 1963, John Lennon and Paul McCartney began writing the hit song “She Loves You” after a concert at the Majestic Ballroom in Newcastle upon Tyne. The popular Beatles song is sung from a third party point of view, something has been attributed to Lennon’s songwriting style.

2084-large6/27- Leigh Nash was born on this day in 1976. Nash is founding member of the American pop band Sixpence None the Richer. (Sound familiar? Think  of the song “Kiss Me” back in 1997. Yeah, that band.)

55737-large6/28- On this day in 1968, singer Aretha Franklin was featured on the cover on Time magazine. The issue’s fitting title was “The Sound of Soul“.

129105-large6/29- On this day in 1975, Elton John made surprise appearances at the Days on the Green concert series in Oakland, California, during the encores of both the Doobie Brothers and the Eagles shows.

6/30- Cher43493-large married Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band on this day in 1975, just a few days after her divorce from Sonny Bono was finalized. She filed divorce from Allman only nine days later, but the couple stayed together for a rocky few years.

MI00022975197/1- Dennis Brown, “The Crown Prince of Reggae”, passed away on this day in 1999. Brown was incredibly influential in the reggae and lovers rock scenes, having recorded dozens of albums with Jamaica’s best labels and producers including Studio One, Joe Gibbs, Trojan, and Greensleeves to name a few.

8327-large7/2- And estimated 3 billion people watched the Live 8 concerts that were televised from around the world on this day in 2005. Performers included R.E.M., Jay-Z, Toby Keith, and more, who came together with the goal to make poverty history.

Dig any of these albums? Wanna hear ’em in losssless? Well they’re right here on Murfie! Find them for as little as $1 in the marketplace!