Record Store Day is almost here!

record-store-day-vinyls

Attention all you audiophiles out there! If you didn’t know, the 10th anniversary of Record Store Day will be commencing Saturday, April 22nd 2017. In celebration of this informal holiday, Murfie will be selling a number of handpicked CDs.

Record Store Day was founded in 2007 as a means of celebrating the culture of the independent record store. It brings together musicians, fans and records stores alike from all across the globe. A number of records are pressed specifically for the occasion and are distributed to participating shops in various countries. Live performances also take place in various record stores during this day.

In addition, we are pleased to announce that St. Vincent (a frequent contributor to Record Store Day), was elected to be its ambassador! In the past she offered a red seven-inch single in 2012, a ten-inch in 2015 and took part in a Vinyl Tuesday panel.

The staff here at Murfie are excited to celebrate this holiday with both its customers and the community. No doubt we will be doing a little digging of our own! We will be announcing our newly listed CDs next week before the big event so stay tuned.

Which artists are on your Record Store Day wishlist? The Murfie shop might have just what your looking for!

Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

DJ Pain 1DJ Pain 1 is a prominent hip-hop producer, and over the years he’s worked with names you know like Young Jeezy, Public Enemy and Ludacris. He’s also a Madison local and active community member who volunteers for non-profits. We had the great pleasure of having him here at the Murfie office recently.

In this interview, he brings up some important topics—like the pressure that Madison police put on venues that try to book hip-hop shows. Unfortunately, the lack of hip-hop in Madison makes it hard for talented acts to really blossom in town. What you might not know about DJ Pain 1 is that his real name is Pacal Bayley. He’s a true lover of all dedicated musicians, a physical music collector, and a mushroom hunter—although he’ll never tell you where he finds morels.

Now, I don’t want to give away all the best parts. Here’s a transcript of our interview along with the recorded version (below) on our Soundcloud player.

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Who: DJ Pain 1; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
Where: Murfie HQ, Madison, WI
When: Wednesday July 1st, 2015

K: So I am currently in one of the Murfie warehouse rooms surrounded by discs with DJ Pain 1. Welcome to the office, first of all.

DJ: This is kind of surreal.

K: It is. Being surrounded by so much music kind of makes you think about all the albums that have come out over the years.

DJ: Well all I see is boxes, so I’m just smelling cardboard—and there are all these boxes with numbers written on all of them. It’s like musical coffins or something.

K: That’s one way to think about it, for the people who store their CDs here. We do have people who get their CDs digitized and shipped back to them. But I suppose it is a good resting place, and these boxes are actually like water resistant and temperature—

DJ: Oh they are?

K: Yeah we make sure everything stays nice and cozy in there. But you know there are a lot of things to talk about in music, especially someone like you who is involved on all these different levels. So over the years as you’ve gained all your experience, the music industry has changed a lot, especially recently, in terms of the way people listen to music, and the way it’s being released. So in your opinion, is the music industry changing for better or for worse?

DJ: I think it’s always a duality. I think access is a good thing, and access has been improving for decades now. And so what access begets is saturation. And of course it changes the landscape as far as fans are concerned and their expectations of artists. They expect a lot of music, and they expect instant access, and they expect free most of all. And so that’s not necessary a bad thing, because it’s forced artists to really adapt in new and innovative ways, whether it’s just challenging the traditions of a genre or finding new and exciting ways to market and promote themselves. So, it’s good for some and bad for others, I guess that’s a subjective question. And I don’t necessarily know, because I’m benefiting a lot from it—but then on a macro level the music industry is just kind of crumbling before my very eyes. At first that kind of scared me, but now I’m just sitting there looking at my watch waiting for it to happen, because I kind of can’t stand the paradigm. But it also every now and then lets me in through a door, and then I make some money and get some notoriety off it.

DJ Pain 1K: Well I like what you said about finding ways to adapt that are new and interesting. I feel like that’s gonna be the differentiator between people who succeed regardless of how the music industry ends up being. So what are some of the best ways that you’ve learned to connect with your audience and make a living?

DJ: I give a lot of stuff away for free. And maybe the ratio is somewhere around 10:1 or 15:1. 15 being what I give away and 1 being what I sell. It gives me more leverage for the people that are following me and benefiting from the resources I give out. So I don’t know if it works, but it’s worked for me in some capacity, so I’m going to keep doing it.

K: Well especially if your music is good and people like it.

DJ: Yeah with me I really speak more to the producer community, so: free resources for producers, a lot of video advice for just aspiring artists of all kinds, and streaming Q&A shows, panels, the professional development stuff that we do locally here. I’ve done it around the country too a little.

K: So you’ve seen Madison’s music scene, and you’ve also traveled to different places. How does Madison’s music scene compare to other places?

DJ: That goes back to the word access. I’m gonna use Appleton as an example just because it’s so close and it’s so much smaller than Madison. I mean, their population is a lot smaller than Madison’s. You know alone we have 40,000+ just students, just like a transient population, but Appleton has more venues, more music events going on concurrently, more music festivals, and just it seems that there’s more access. And I know that things have changed maybe in the last year or two, but when I go there it appears to me that they have more going on. When you come to Madison there are very few options as far as live music goes, and especially if you’re a fan of what people would consider—quote urban unquote—styles of music. That’s unfortunate. Because I mean the talent here isn’t any less amazing. And I’ve been all over the place and we have great talent here. But I think access and opportunity not only allows for sustainability, but it also promotes talent too, and growth too. I mean people feel boxed in here, so I don’t think we’re all growing as much as we could be.

K: You know, when you say that, I do realize I haven’t seen a lot of hip-hop and rap shows being promoted.

DJ: No they’re all banned, it’s banned. Name a venue and I’m probably banned from it.

K: Really! Majestic? Frequency?

Continue reading Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

Ownership Matters: Pay it forward, buy the album

Amanda Palmer recently wrote an interesting article that used personal experience to show how fans truly want to pay artists they love.

Amanda spent years as a street performer—an eight foot bride on a box who gave out flowers to anyone who tipped her. Of the millions of passers-by, Amanda said some people watched her performance and gave nothing. Some watched and tipped upwards of $20. Some watched, enjoyed the performance, and left personal notes or gifts since they didn’t have money.

When Amanda was in The Dresden Dolls, fans would approach her after concerts with $10 bills, admitting they burned copies of her CDs since they couldn’t find them in stores. They wanted to make up for it.

The big message Amanda learned from her experiences: “People actually like supporting the artists whose work they like. It makes them feel happy.”

In a time where free streaming services seem to dominate the music listening experience, it’s harder for fans to invest in the musicians they really appreciate. The money artists make early on from streaming services is a tiny fraction of what they could have made if those fans also bought the album when it came out.

It’s important that streaming fans buy albums and patronize their favorite artists. Media ownership enables fans to reward artists in a much different way from streaming. Physical album purchases pull all the money up front where it should be: it’s not resting on the uncertain future mathematics of streaming payouts from services like Spotify.

At Murfie, we’re all about providing modern, digital ownership in the cloud. Your ownership of physical CDs is boosted with the streaming and download service we provide for your collection. We have new CDs listed for sale, and you can buy any CD from any artist or store, or from sites like Amazon, and have it shipped directly to your Murfie collection. Murfie lets fans buy albums and support artists without sacrificing the convenience of streaming.

When you love an artist, no matter how you listen to their music, it feels great to invest in them and own a piece of it. Give it a try. “When people feel and know that you are keeping the channels open, doors open, airwaves unblocked, locks unlocked….they come,” says Palmer. “And they will pay their hard-earned to keep the content existing and the cycle continuing.”

Elephant Revival Interview

Elephant Revival is a band that blends folk music with bluegrass, celtic music, psychedelic country, indie rock, and occasionally, even reggae and hip hop. Even with so many different sounds in their songs, they retain a style that is distinctly their own—mostly because of their wonderful vocals and environmentally conscious themes. Since 2006, they’ve been building a solid fan base around the country, and are about to embark on a Midwest tour. On September 28th, they’ll be playing at the Majestic Theatre in Madison, just a skip away from Murfie HQ—so we thought the time was perfect to learn a bit more about them! Here’s a Q&A I had with Dan Rodriguez (acoustic guitar, electric banjo/guitar, vocals). We talked via phone from his friend’s studio in Boulder, Colorado:

K: I see you guys are from Nederland, Colorado!

D: Yeah. We started there, and we all lived there for a handful of years. Just recently Sage moved back to Kansas to the family farm. So we’re not all living in Nederland now, but we still consider ourselves a Nederland band.

K: I actually visited that place for the first time last year for Nedfest—have you gone to that?

D: I’ve gone to it many times, and performed there a few times too. It’s a hometown fest!

K: Nederland is a funky little town, there’s mountains and taverns and flannel—I love it. And the people are really nice. One thing I like about your band is it’s a co-ed band, a mix of guys and girls. Have you found that it brings a certain energy to the band?

D: I certainly couldn’t imagine it any differently. The men and the women—the kind of alchemy that happens—it’s just been such an integral part of everything. It’s just a big part of our sound and part of the vibe.

K: So you all are coming to Madison on September 28th —do you have shows in between then?

D: Yeah, we do. We have one in Minneapolis, at the Cedar Cultural Center, and then we play Boats and Bluegrass Festival in Winona, Minnesota, then we play Ames, Iowa, and then we’re in Madison.

K: Have you had some good luck touring in the past? Do you like to travel around for shows?

Continue reading Elephant Revival Interview

Interview with Pigeon John [Podcast]

Pigeon John is a rapper and more—with a deep focus on the musical element of his songs and influences from De La Soul to The Beatles, lovers of pop, rock, and blues can easily find themselves turned on to his sound. After continually evolving over the years, Pigeon John has discovered himself as a writer and storyteller, making his everlasting mark on the exciting genre of hip hop.

Encino Man is set to be released April 29th—order your copy on Murfie today!

Encino ManWho: Pigeon John; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Pigeon John describes the similar spirit in all music, the importance of being your own planet, and the dangerous, relevant, “pinpoint sharp” American genre known as hip hop.
Where: Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (Cleveland, OH) and Murfie headquarters (Madison, WI), via Skype
When: Wednesday, March 12th, 2014
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Find music by Pigeon John in our shop.

Check out more at pigeonjohn.com.

Into RSS? Follow our podcast feed via https://blog.murfie.com/category/podcasts/feed.

This Week in Music History (October 30th-November 5th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

10/30- On this day in 1971, John Lennon went to No. 1 on the UK charts with his album Imagine. The album contained two songs—”How Do You Sleep” and “Crippled Inside”—attacking Lennon’s former Beatles bandmate Paul McCartney.

10/31- On this day in 1970, Led Zeppelin began a four-week stint at No. 1 on the US album charts. The hit album, Led Zeppelin III, was the band’s second US smash and remains one of its most critically acclaimed albums to this day.

11/01- On this day in 1980, Bruce Springsteen’s first No. 1 US album, The River, reached the top of the charts. The album was just one example of The Boss’s massive success, and is still critically acclaimed to this day. Rolling Stone ranked it #253 on its list of the greatest albums of all time.

11/02- On this day in 2002, police arrested an international gang that was planning to kidnap Victoria Beckham, formerly Posh Spice of the Spice Girls, and her young child. The group had planned to ransom Posh for £5 million, so they were taken in to custody and Beckham and her family were kept safe.

11/03- On this day in 1957, Jerry Lee Lewis released Great Balls of Fire with Sun Records. The single went on to become a massive hit, taking the No. 1 spot in the UK and No. 2 in the US.

11/04- On this day in 1980, reggae legend Bob Marley was baptized at the Ethiopian Orthodox Church in Kingston, Jamaica. Marley officially became a Christian Rastafarian and took the new name Berhane Selassie.

11/05- On this day in 1956, The Nat King Cole Show premiered on NBC-TV in the United States. Cole’s program became one of the first of its kind on national television to be hosted by an African-American.

Are you looking to own a piece of music history, or download it in lossless formats? Check these albums out in our marketplace!

This Week in Music History (July 17th-23rd)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

12926-large7/17- On this day in 1968, The Beatles released their feature length cartoon, Yellow Submarine. Based on their songs and packed with interesting characters, the plot follows the four band members as they save Pepperland from the Blue Meanies.

27978-large7/18- On this day in 1968, the Grateful Dead released their second studio album, Anthem of the Sun. The album consists of five tracks that blend live concert tapes with studio recordings, successfully meeting the goal of conveying the band’s live sound to listeners.

MI00016306557/19- On this day in 1966, 50-year-old Frank Sinatra married actress Mia Farrow, who was almost 30 years younger at the time! Their marriage ended two years later when Mia’s filming schedule prevented her from being able to be in Sinatra’s upcoming film.

43170-large7/20- Speaking of Sinatra…on this day in 1965, Frank put his hands and feet in the cement at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, joining the ranks of Shirley Temple, Bing Crosby, and Judy Garland.

3649-large7/21- On this day in 1987, Guns N’ Roses released their first album, Appetite for Destruction. Rolling Stone says the album is ranked as the highest selling debut album of the eighties, and with hits like “Welcome to the Jungle” and “Paradise City”, it’s a must-listen!

69310-large7/22- On this day in 1941, George Clinton was born. Known as the mastermind behind Parliament and Funkadelic, this man is certainly an innovator of funk.

7890-large7/23- On this day in 2011, 27-year-old singer Amy Winehouse passed away from alcohol poisoning at her home in London. The huge amounts of critical acclaim for her music was met with almost equal criticism for her substance abuse problems. Recordings made during her rather short run have influenced countless modern female artists.

Oh, so you want to own any of these gems, or download them in lossless format? Well we just so happen to have them for sale for as low as $1! Find ‘em in our marketplace.