Interview with Wheelhouse [Podcast]

Q: What do you get when you put four funny dudes in the same room to talk about music? A: Quite the entertaining interview.

Wheelhouse is a four piece Americana/Bluegrass band keeping the red dirt style going hard in Madison. The energy at their live shows is infectious—on Tuesdays at the Come Back In, they’re met with cheery beer-drinking patrons who dance, stomp, and hoot n’ holler a bit too. Now Wheelhouse is releasing a new album called Meanwhile Back At The Ranch, with promises to deliver a sound as ear-catching as their live gigs. Their CD release party is Saturday March 28th at High Noon Saloon with Wisconsin reggae-rockers T.U.G.G.

In this short interview, the Wheelhouse guys talk music, the changing industry for fans and musicians, and of course—whiskey!

Pre-order Meanwhile Back At The Ranch ($10) ► email info@murfie.com!

Meanwhile Back at the Ranch - WheelhouseWho: Kenny Leiser, Frank Busch, Nic Adamany and Mark Noxon; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: How musicians make a living, those first music purchases, and the glorious power of Wheelhouse Whiskey
Where: Murfie HQ, Madison
When: Friday, March 20th, 2015
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

What is Murfie?

Murfie’s platform enables customers to stream their physical music CDs and vinyl conveniently from the cloud to browsers, mobile devices and wifi connected home stereo systems, at up to lossless and hi-res quality. Murfie customers can also download their music in FLAC, ALAC, mp3 and aac, and instantly add new and used music to their cloud collection from the Murfie marketplace.



Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


Interview with Charlie Parr

To celebrate #ThrowbackThursday, we went into the Murfie Podcast vault to bring you this transcription of our interview with Charlie Parr, recorded on April 9th, 2012! You can listen to the full audio podcast here.

Charlie Parr_MG_7107

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast. This week, we’re featuring the one and only Charlie Parr. Now, he’s humble about this, but he’s widely known for his work in gospel and bluegrass music. Recently, he gave me a call to tell me about his new album, Keep Your Hands on the Plow.

[MUSIC: “Gospel Plow” by Charlie Parr]

Kayla: So Charlie, where are you calling from?

Charlie: I’m actually calling from my mom’s house, in Austin, Minnesota. I came down with the kids for the holiday weekend, for Easter, and we’re still here and gonna get up in the morning and head back to Duluth.

Kayla: Ahhh. So, are you from Minnesota originally?

Charlie: Yeah, I’m actually from Austin, Minnesota. I grew up here, left in the mid-‘80s, I think it was, stopped in Minneapolis for a few years, and then headed for Duluth.

Charlie Parr 1922Kayla: Mmhmm. I saw that you spent some time in Australia, touring because of the success of your album, 1922—so how was that?

Charlie: Yeah, oh, it was good. I’ve been over there now…five times? I’ll head back over again in probably January of 2013, for another run. It’s great, I love touring in Australia. It’s kind of like touring in the Midwest—it’s relatively easy, and everybody’s really friendly…really nice.

Kayla: So, your success there…I know it started with the song “1922”, and I heard there’s kind of an interesting story behind that, about your father?

Charlie: Oh, about the song, yeah. I mean, I didn’t really start writin’ songs until my dad had died in ’95, and so that was one of the first ones I ever wrote. It’s named for the year he was born, in 1922, and it’s primarily just a bunch of little snippets of things that he had talked about, or told me about. He had all kinds of adventures when he was a kid, when he was a teenager, early teens, y’know. The Depression was on and they were livin’ in a large family—he had, I think, eighteen brothers and sisters, or seventeen brothers and sisters. And he took off, and went out and hopped freight trains, and done stuff like that for quite awhile, and had a bunch of stories to tell me when I was a kid, and I always remembered all of ‘em. So when I started tryin’ to write songs, some of the first songs I tried to write were about him, and those stories, and I think it was a way to grieve, y’know. I think it still is, ‘cause a lot of the songs I’m still writing to this day have touches of all the things that I kinda learned from him. He was a gigantic influence on me in a lot of ways. He was a good father, he was quite a mentor.

Kayla: Mmhmm. And musically, too, has he had any influence on you?

Charlie: He did, when I was a kid. Y’know, his record collection is my record collection now. He listened to old country western music and old folk music, and blues, and acoustic music. And when I was a kid, that’s what I listened to, ‘cause that’s what played all the time in the house. And he bought me my first guitar when I was seven years old. He traded a perfectly good boat motor in on this guitar, and I’d better learn how to play it, ‘cause that was a really good trolling motor, as opposed to the other motor he had, which wasn’t as good. But, yeah, so I mean, I kind of owe it all to him.

137842-largeKayla: I see that on your recent album, Keep Your Hands on the Plow, Emily Parr lent her talents on there for some vocals and tambourine—is that your wife?

Charlie: That’s my wife, yeah, she’s the other person I kinda owe it all to. It’s always nice when she gets to sing a little bit with me, and we planned this whole record out kind of together…songs that we both like, y’know, older songs…it’s some gospel songs, and some traditional songs, and even a chain gang song on there. It was really nice, gettin’ to record with her. Unfortunately, we don’t get to perform much together because, y’know, she’s got a job and works quite a bit.

Kayla: She’s got a great voice—does she have a history with music or singing?

Charlie: Oh, yeah, I mean she’s done this kind of stuff all of her life. She went to college and had a degree in music and theater, so she’s always been interested in music. And she plays the flute, and she’s played in symphony-type situations quite a bit. I’m untrained myself, so we can’t really play music together because I don’t have a clue what’s going on and it’s frustrating for her, I think.

Kayla: [Laughs] So you’re mostly self-taught then?

Charlie: I’m all self-taught, yeah. I just learned from listening to old records of my dad’s, tryin’ to pick out what they were doin’. And I’m still tryin’ to learn—I don’t think it ever stops…which is good, y’know, it keeps you interested. And sometimes it’s frustrating, and you feel like there’s gotta be a quicker way, but in a way, I think that’s maybe not a good way to think about it, because the way I took did me a lot of good, I think, even though it was longer.

Kayla: So, your new album was recorded in a church—how was that? Was it different than your other recordings, or have you done that before?

Charlie: I’ve done a few things in a church, once in awhile. It was decommissioned some time ago, and it’s now a performance space and recording studio in Duluth—the Sacred Heart. And it’s pretty amazing, I mean when you walk in, it’s a church, it’s a huge sanctuary, so you get that kind of church-y sound, y’know—it’s got a nine-second reverb time in the sanctuary. So it’s a pretty incredible place to just…be, and perform, much less record in. So it was really nice, and it is different…I usually record wherever I feel comfortable. We’ve recorded in garages and storefronts and bar basements, and wherever it feels right, y’know. So, it felt good…and we had a really nice afternoon, and pretty much got the whole thing done in an afternoon and a little bit the day before, when I came in and did a couple solo things.

Kayla: So, this album was released in 2011, and—I love it by the way—so, what have you got planned for this year?

Charlie: This year, I’m starting to record the next record which will be kind of more back to my own original material, and I’m probably gonna record it in Cannon Falls, Minnesota, at a friend of mine’s house down there. And it’s probably not gonna be out until early in ’13. I’m doing a lot of touring before then, so I don’t know if I’m gonna get around to recording it until sometime this summer. But I’m heading out for Ireland here at the end of this month, and then I’ve got shows all through the summer, and might be heading back to Europe in the fall, and then Australia in the early part of next year. But the new record, the next one comin’ up, it’s gonna be called Barnswallow. And it’s probably gonna be more of the same that I usually do, my own kind of songs, harmonica player and a washboard player, maybe talk Emily into comin’ down and singin’ a couple of songs…we’ll see what happens, I guess.

Kayla: Well, definitely keep us posted about that! We’ll have that to look forward to. And good luck with touring, too! It looks like you’re gonna be pretty busy.

Charlie: Yeah, it’s been good though—I’ve been really lucky. Thank you very much.

Kayla: Yeah—thank you!

OUTRO: And that was Charlie Parr. You can find him at charlieparr.com, and the album Keep Your Hands on the Plow is available now. Thanks for listening, and enjoy this clip of “Gospel Plow”.

[MUSIC: “Gospel Plow” by Charlie Parr]

What’s on Murfie: Tributes to the Beatles

The often-imitated, never-duplicated Paul, John, George and Ringo hold an unmatched place in our hearts and our music collections. Who didn’t grow up with “Yellow Submarine” and “Hey Jude” in the background? Only Paul and Ringo are still around these days, but the Fab Four remain musical icons and the face of an era. It’s no wonder that artists across the globe continue to pay tribute to their legendary tunes. We searched Murfie for four Beatles tribute albums and found these: they may span genres and time periods, but they keep their love of those guys from Liverpool at the forefront.

2159-largeA Tower Records Tribute to the Beatles
1996

There’s nothing quite like having some of music’s biggest stars cover music’s ultimate stars. Famed record company Tower Records released this 10-track collection in 1996, featuring covers of some of The Beatles’ greatest hits. Some of the 20th century’s greatest musicians pay their tribute, including Ike & Tina Turner on “Get Back” and The Beach Boys with “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away”. Doing the Fab Four justice is a tall order, but these Tower Records stars give their classic tracks a twist that’s certainly worth a listen.

129850-largeTropical Tribute to the Beatles
1996

This album features an international interpretation of some of The Beatles’ most famous tracks using Latin rhythms like salsa, merengue, mambo and bolero. Some of Latin music’s biggest names, like Celia Cruz and Manny Manuel, take on 13 of the most famous Beatles songs, including “Can’t Buy Me Love”, “Come Together”, “Let it Be” and “Hey Jude”. If you’re looking for something that closely resembles the original, this is definitely not the album for you. But if you’re open to a rhythm-heavy, genre-bending international take on some of the greatest songs of all time? This album and its dance-hall ready sounds are a great choice.

MI0000874100Easy Star’s Lonely Hearts Dub Band
2009

Reggae collective Easy Star All-Stars have stepped in to provide their 13-track, dub-heavy tribute to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, arguably one of The Beatles’ most influential and best-loved albums. This tribute is truly easy listening, featuring knockout performances by guest stars the likes of Matisyahu.  It’s groovy without being overly produced or ambitious—the perfect reggae interpretation of one of the best-loved albums of all time. Don’t miss “Within Without You”, featuring Matisyahu, or  Ranking Roger’s “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite”.

08e09b5c-11a7-11e2-bd3a-1231381369e0Pickin’ on the Beatles
1995

This tribute is part of the Pickin’ On Series, which features some of rock’s greatest albums with a bluegrass and country style. This album is no different, with 12 of The Beatles’ most famous tracks gone country. Songs like “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “Yellow Submarine” quickly convinced me that these songs are quite a stretch from the originals. This interpretation of The Beatles, with its fiddles, banjos and mandolins, is certainly different, and I would only recommend it for die-hard bluegrass fans.

Interview with Charlie Parr [PODCAST]

Charlie Parr, a respected country blues musician, was kind enough to give us a phone interview. Check it out below, and make sure to also check out his newest album Keep Your Hands on the Plow.

Charlie Parr Keep Your Hands on the PlowWho: Charlie Parr; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: The self-taught musician: Where he comes from and where he’s going.
Where: Madison, WI
When: Monday, April 9, 2012
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Like what you heard? Browse Charlie Parr’s albums on Murfie.

Check out more of Charlie at www.charlieparr.com.

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