This Week in Music History (April 23rd-29th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

6384-large4/23- On this day in 1971, The Rolling Stones released their classic album Sticky Fingers in their native UK. The album, which was the band’s first release on their own label via Atlantic Records, featured art by Andy Warhol, whom the Stones hired for $15,000.

128999-large4/24- On this day in 1979, the state of Georgia made Ray Charles‘ “Georgia on My Mind” its official song. Charles, a Georgia native, recorded the track in 1960 as part of his album The Genius Hits the Road

146-large4/25- On this day in 1987, U2 began a five-week run atop the US album chart with their fifth studio album, The Joshua TreeThe album topped charts in over 20 countries and sold over 25 million copies. Bono and company also went on to win a Grammy Award for Album of the Year.

4999-large4/26- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin played their hit song “Whole Lotta Love” in front of a live audience for the first time. The show, which took place at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, was part of the band’s second North American tour.

35056-large4/27- On this day in 1976, David Bowie was detained by customs officers at the Russian/Polish border after attempting to board a train. The officers detained Bowie after finding Nazi books and memorabilia in his luggage, which he claimed were being used for research on a project about Nazi propaganda leader Joseph Goebbels. 

359561-large4/28- On this day in 1973, Pink Floyd‘s iconic album The Dark Side of the Moon hit No. 1 on the US album chart. The album went on to see a record-breaking 741 weeks atop the Billboard Chart, and now has sold over 45 million copies worldwide.

102762-large4/29- On this day in 1933, country music legend Willie Nelson was born. Nelson is one of country music’s most recognizable and influential singers and songwriters, and is also a poet, activist, actor and author. He has appeared in over 30 films, co-authored several books, and campaigned for numerous causes, including the use of biofuels.

All these pieces of music history are available in our music marketplace! Every CD purchase comes with unlimited streaming (Web, iOS, Android, Sonos) and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC.

This Week in Music History (January 15th-21st)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/15- On this day in 1961, The Supremes signed a recording contract with Motown Records. Originally known as The Primettes, the group became America’s most successful group with 12 No. 1 singles on the Billboard Hot 100.

1/16- On this day in 1996, Jamaican authorities opened fire on Jimmy Buffett’s seaplane, which they mistakenly believed belonged to a drug trafficker. Neither Buffett nor U2 frontman Bono, who was also on the plan, was injured.

1/17- On this day in 1964, The Rolling Stones released their first EP. It included “You Better Move On”, “Bye Bye Johnny”, “Poison Ivy”, and “Money”, and peaked at No. 15 on the UK chart.

1/18- On this day in 1965, The Beatles made their debut on the US charts when their single “I Want to Hold Your Hand” entered the chart at No. 45. It would go on to spend seven weeks on the chart’s top spot.

1/19- On this day in 1980, Pink Floyd’s The Wall began a 15-week run at No. 1 on the US album chart. The album, which went on to sell over 23 million copies in the US alone, is the third largest grossing album of all time in the US.

1/20- On this day in 1982, during an Ozzy Osbourne concert in Des Moines, Iowa, an audience member threw a bat onto the stage. Thinking the bat was fake, Osbourne picked it up and attempted to bite its head off. Only then did Ozzy realize that the bat was living, and he was rushed to the nearest hospital for rabies shots.

1/21- On this day in 1968, Jimi Hendrix recorded his version of Bob Dylan’s famous song “All Along the Watchtower” at Olympic Studios in London, UK. The track was released as a single in the US, peaking at No. 20.

It’s easy to own your own pieces of music history—just head to our CD marketplace! Every purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads…now that’s pretty rockin’ ;)

This Week in Music History (November 20th-26th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

11/20- On this day in 1976, Paul Simon hosted NBC’s Saturday Night Live. Simon appeared live with George Harrison, performing tracks including “Here Comes the Sun” and “Homeward Bound”.

11/21- On this day in 1970, Jimi Hendrix shot to No.1 on the UK singles chart with “Voodoo Child”, the closing track on Electric Ladyland. The track was Hendrix’s only No.1 UK single, and his guitar solo was named the 11th greatest solo of all time in Guitar World’s 100 Greatest Guitar Solos.

11/22- On this day in 1965, Bob Dylan married Sara Lowndes in a secret ceremony in Mineola, Long Island. The couple had a son, singer Jakob Dylan, but Lowndes filed for divorce in 1977.

11/23- On this day in 1899, the world’s first jukebox was installed in San Francisco at the Palais Royal Hotel. The term “jukebox”, however, only became popular in the 1940s.

11/24- On this day in 1966, The Beatles returned to the studio for the first time after their US summer tour. They spent the day recording “Strawberry Fields Forever”, a track that would go on to become their next single and one of their most famous of all time.

11/25- On this day in 1984, some of the biggest names in British music gathered at S.A.R.M. Studios in London to record the hit single “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”. The single, which featured artists like Bono, Boy George, Sting, George Michael and Paul Young, sold over three million copies in the UK.

11/26- On this day in 1958, Johnny Cash made his debut on the US top country chart with “Cry, Cry, Cry”. The song hit number 14 on the chart, but his next seven singles would all reach the country top ten.

So you wanna own any of these gems, or hear them in lossless formats? Well, we just so happen to have them for sale! Find these albums and more pieces of music history in our marketplace!