You Just Might Like: Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen is a man who needs no introduction: throughout his five-decade long career, he’s released 18 studio albums, won 20 Grammys—and has sold nearly 65 million records in the US alone.Born to Run

Even though the Boss’s discography is an enormous, shape-shifting beast, sometimes its not enough; sometimes you greedily crave more than the Boss can given you. Perhaps you’re looking for a darker take on Darkness on the Edge of Town, or perhaps you’re aching for a modernized Born to Run. Either way, you’re in luck: a lot of kids kicking around in bands today were raised on Bruce’s best stuff.

Here are a few you just might like.

The Gaslight Anthem

The Gaslight Anthem:

The Gaslight Anthem is four dudes from Jersey who not only idolize Bruce, but have actually opened for him. Their ties to Springsteen mostly lie in band leader Brian Fallon’s lyrics, which claw for lost youth and faded lovers—even though they’re probably too young to have earned that right. Musically they’re a tad heavier than Bruce’s biggest anthems, but the two artists’ spirits ride on the same highway. Their 2010 album American Slang is a great place to start.

The Hold Steady:

The Hold StBoys and Girls in Americaeady is a Brooklyn group that hails from the Minneapolis bar band scene. They’re well versed in catchy riffs, epic piano solos and lyrics that hail a unified scene. Lead singer Craig Finn shouts and speaks more than he sings, but his enthusiasm for his words, for his band—and for music in general—allow him to pull his style off with, well, style. The Hold Steady’s 2006 album Boys and Girls in America riffs off of Kerouac’s On the Road and Springsteen’s Born to Run at an equal rate, and is a fantastic jumping off point.

Arcade Fire:Neon Bible

Arcade Fire have recently shifted into dance-friendly territory with Reflektor, but just a few years back they proudly wore Springsteen’s influence on their sleeve. This is especially apparent on anthems like “Keep the Car Running” and “(Antichrist Television Blues),” two standouts from Neon Bible. The Boss himself even joined Arcade Fire onstage for “Keep the Car Running” at a gig in Ottawa in 2007, a performance which you can (and should) catch below.


Andrew Brandt
@andrewtbrandt

Andrew is a communications intern at Murfie. When he’s not blogging here, you can probably find him blogging at a handful of other music sites. And when he’s not blogging at all, you can probably find him curled up with a good beer and a great book.



This Week in Music History (February 12th-18th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

2/12- On this day in 1964, The Beatles arrived in New York City for two performances at Carnegie Hall. Tickets were in such high demand that show organizers hastily created last-minute seating around the stage.

2/13- On this day in 1960, Frank Sinatra launched his own record label, Reprise Records, in an attempt to gain more artistic freedom for his work. The label earned Sinatra the nickname “Chairman of the Board”, and would later sign acts including Jimi Hendrix and The Beach Boys.

2/14- On this (Valentine’s!) day in 1998, Celine Dion‘s “My Heart Will Go On” set a new record for the highest number of radio plays in the United States after it was played 116 million times in one week.

2/15- On this day in 1962, Ray Charles recorded “I Can’t Stop Loving You” at United Studios in Hollywood, California. The song would go on to top the charts in both the US and the UK and remain there for 14 weeks.

2/16- On this day in 1985, Bruce Springsteen went to No. 1 on the UK album chart with Born to Run, his first UK No. 1 album. The album was the best-selling album of 1985 in the United States and The Boss’s all-time best-selling album.

2/17- On this day in 2005, a 1965 Fender Stratocaster guitar that had belonged to Jimi Hendrix was sold for £100,000 at an auction in London. Other Hendrix memorabilia, including a poem and a signed copy of “Hey Joe”, were auctioned as well.

2/18- On this day in 1990, Queen frontman Freddie Mercury made his final public appearance onstage when he joined his band to accept the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. The ceremony was held at the Dominion Theatre in London.

Check out these albums and other music history gems in our CD marketplace! Stream and download your favorites!

Sounds Like New Jersey: The Best of the Garden State

Last time, we brought you the best albums Colorado has to offer. This time, let’s head east to check out the best of the Garden State. Here are reviews of three albums by Jersey natives!

Bruce Springsteen
Born to Run

After two low-budget albums, The Boss released his third, Born to Run, with a superstar budget and big aspirations. Before this album, Springsteen was mostly propelled by local love and word of mouth; Born to Run was a make-or-break shot at the big leagues.

It couldn’t be more successful at this mission—Born to Run is a superb album that cemented Springsteen’s status as someone who would make his mark on rock & roll. Each track is full of both drama and familiar themes of American life. The songs are familiar stories, told in a new way that’s an unprecedented level of exciting and meaningful.

Most important, though, is that The Boss just makes music that’s what rock should be. Each track is filled with incredible instrumentals: harmonicas, pianos, organs, great guitar lines and fantastic chords—and it’s all tied together by an unshakable spirit and energy. Born to Run is an exhilarating listening experience.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Born to Run”, “Thunder Road”, “Backstreets”

Lauryn Hill
The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill

Turns out 1998 was one amazing year for hip hop: between Outkast’s Aquemini, Talib Kweli and Mos Def’s Black Star, and Lauryn Hill, it was truly a year to remember. Even in a year of standouts, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill raised the bar. Hill’s hip-hop foundation with gospel, soul, reggae and funk layered on top made it the stellar album that won a record five Grammy Awards.

Hill’s music truly sounds like poetry, which, given its subject matter, is definitely appropriate. The album takes on the issue of love in many manifestations, ranging from deep happiness on tracks like “Nothing Even Matters” to sadness on “I Used to Love Him”. Rapper Nas described the album’s style as “the soul of Roberta Flack, the passion of Bob Marley, the essence of Aretha Franklin all wrapped up in one thing”.

What’s best about this album is that Hill created her own sound. Rather than trying to emulate existing hip-hop, she forged her own path—a brand new style. This album feels like a new artist—and genre—is born.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Doo Wop”, “Superstar”

Bon Jovi
Slippery When Wet

It’s impossible to talk about New Jersey without mentioning Jon Bon Jovi and crew. Listening to this album reminds you of every party you’ve been at when “Livin’ on a Prayer” comes on, and suddenly you’re singing along. This band has a way of sticking in your mind.

Bon Jovi may love his lyrical clichés, but there’s no denying how much fun this music is. In its best moments, like “Livin on a Prayer” or “Wanted Dead or Alive”, Slippery When Wet creates a melodic frenzy. The album introduces an appealing fusion of pop, rock and metal that brought hair metal onto the mainstream radio. Despite its metal influences, however, this album is most true to pop.

“It’s alright if you have a good time”, Bon Jovi sang on “Let it Rock”, and that’s the theme of this album: it’s an accessible, middle-of-the-road approach to rock that deviated from other hard-edged ‘80s music and created an appealing, carefree alternative that ultimately became an ‘80s soundtrack.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Livin’ on a Prayer”, “Wanted Dead or Alive”

These albums currently range from $1 to $4 on Murfie. Grab ’em now!

This Week in Music History (October 23rd-29th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

10/23- On this day in 1963, Bob Dylan recorded his hit album The Times They Are A-Changin’ at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City. The album, Dylan’s third, was his first to feature only original compositions.

10/24- On this day in 1962, soul legend James Brown recorded his world-famous Live at the Apollo album. In 2003, the album was ranked No. 24 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

10/25- On this day in 1968, Led Zeppelin played their first show after changing their name from The New Yardbirds. The show took place at Surrey University in England, and a poster for the gig later sold at auction for £2400!

10/26- On this day in 1970, a wake was held in San Anselmo, California to celebrate the life of late singer Janis Joplin. Joplin, who passed away after an accidental drug overdose, had left money in her will specifically for throwing a party in the event of her death.

10/27- On this day in 1975, after releasing the incredibly popular and successful album/single combination Born to Run, Bruce Springsteen was featured simultaneously on the covers of Time and Newsweek magazines. Born to Run was a huge commercial and critical success, selling six million copies by 2000!

10/28- On this day in 1978, Queen played the first night on their 79-date tour for their album Jazz. The first show took place at the Dallas Convention Center in Dallas, Texas. The tour became famous for the spectacle and showmanship Queen displayed at the shows.

10/29- On this day in 1965—speaking of tours—The Rolling Stones kicked off their fourth North American tour. The 37-date tour began at The Forum in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Are you looking to own a piece of music history, or download it in lossless format? Check these albums out on our marketplace!