Ownership Matters: What Apple Music users and Jim Dalrymple should know

“This is Apple Music. And it’s just the beginning.”

Apple’s website tells all: a single user can subscribe to their new streaming service, Apple Music, for $9.99/month. Though it is in fact just beginning, the new service has been met with a cascade of criticism.

Users reported some major hiccups with the service, including the iCloud Music Library aspect, which is meant to bring your iTunes library onto all your devices for you to stream anywhere. Users were reporting duplicate songs, songs that were moved to the wrong album, and missing songs.

Apple blogger Jim Dalrymple’s situation was particularly upsetting. When he was having complications with Apple Music, he decided to turn it off on his devices, resulting in what looked like 4,700 songs disappearing from his view. It’s reason to panic indeed, although Apple Music technically does not alter any of the original song files stored on your PC or other locations.

If your music “disappears”, whether permanently or temporarily, it’s important to have a backup just in case. Choosing to buy physical music that you own saves you from losing files, and from being at the mercy of a large music service, which are both terrifying things.

When you buy a CD on Murfie for example, we’ll give you the download to add to your iTunes, and streaming access you can take anywhere. If something happens to your files, whether it’s your fault or Apple’s, you’ll always have a perfect archive of all the music you own, ready to be downloaded again at any time. If you don’t want to hang on to the CD, we’ll hang on to it for you.

If you choose ownership, you will always have access, and there will be no need to worry. This is something that all Apple users, including Jim Dalrymple, should hopefully know—and we’d love to have them try us out!

Album Review: “Currents” by Tame Impala

Currents
Released: July 17th, 2015
Reviewed by Thomas Johnstone
Rating: 4/5

“I heard about a whirlwind that’s coming ’round / It’s gonna carry off all that isn’t bound,” Kevin Parker announces on “Let It Happen,” opening track of Australian act Tame Impala‘s new record Currents. The lyric forecasts the album’s theme of personal change, from its distant rumblings to its disaffecting aftermath, and given the apocalyptic imagery, we’d hardly expect the changes to be slight.

Fittingly Currents delivers by departing from the act’s previous work in big, surprising ways, given the expectations we might have following two acclaimed albums which comfortably wear the label “psychedelic rock.” Despite possessing a keen sense of melody and lyrical maturity, Kevin Parker—the sole recording and producing musician of Tame Impala (he mixes this time around, as well)—has always seemed less of a songwriter than a clever studio craftsman. A typical track obscured his Lennon-like vocals behind snaking bass lines and 70’s guitar riffs, forming mantra-like jams awash in bombastic drums and reverb. The closing track of 2012’s Lonerism, “Sun’s Coming Up,” seemed to lay the Tame Impala formula bare. A sad carnival waltz for voice and piano, shockingly bare and traditional given everything it follows, eventually turns to full-blown noise collage à la “Revolution 9.” With this self-deconstruction Parker seemed to be both copping to his Beatles influence in the most blatant way, and acknowledging his art’s competing elements: the traditional song, and the abstract, chaotic sound world of an expanded mind.

With Currents, the song finally gets its day in the sun. This is largely an album of pop songs, and Tame Impala’s familiar elliptical jams are kept to a minimum. The main exception is “Let It Happen,” which tries several styles on for size over the course of its nearly eight minute fantasia: dance pop with vocoder, gnarly guitar riffs and even a diversion into synth-orchestra territory that recalls Mercury Rev. It’s like Parker preempted the DJs by remixing the track himself.

As the album progresses it’s clear such meandering is the exception rather than the rule, perhaps by design, as this opening track eases the transition to more traditional territory. Traditional, at least, in the abundance of well-structured songs like “The Moment.” It’s a testament to Parker’s songwriting chops (a few clunky rhymes aside, it feels like he’s been doing this all along) that a listener is more likely to fixate on the newly electronic texture. Keyboards dominate, with guitars mostly relegated to short, funky riffs as on “The Less I Know the Better,” a smirking love song which could easily fit on Daft Punk‘s Random Access Memories. Drums are more danceable and reigned-in (you won’t even hear a crash cymbal until track 5) and vocals no longer feel like an afterthought; Parker’s sweet tenor sits front and center, his double-tracked Lennon pretensions of the past nowhere in sight. Not that he’s entirely abandoned psychedelia, evidenced by a dramatic vocal delay in “Reality In Motion” or the blurry pads of studio scrap “Nangs,” but the effects enhance as much as they obscure. Parker balances the rhythms and textures of his electronic soundscape with surprising ease, resembling Caribou much more than the Beatles. In fact, he slips so comfortably into his new skin it feels like splitting hairs to complain that the album feels merely expert, rather than groundbreaking.

Assured as Parker’s technical skills may be, the heart of the album is a narrative arc shining a light on individual growth. “The Moment” confronts a now-or-never fork in the road, while “Yes I’m Changing” reconciles the choice to move ahead with the pain of what’s left behind. Closing track “New Person, Same Old Mistakes” contemplates change as illusory and temporary, skeptically suggesting Currents‘ arc is not a timeline, but a closed loop: skip back to “Let It Happen” and repeat, ad infinitum.

Currents answers Tame Impala’s rising profile with a daring change of direction, and that move has already earned comparisons to Kid A and Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. Excellent as the record is, the comparison is a bit generous—Currents doesn’t reach the heights of those seminal albums, and Parker’s boldness is of a safer variety. Whereas Radiohead and Wilco showed a willingness to lean into abstraction that bordered on perverse, Tame Impala does the opposite by embracing pop songwriting, and comes out all the more listenable for it.

“They say people never change, but that’s bullshit,” Parker confides on “Yes I’m Changing,” and Currents gives every reason to agree. Parker embraces change so successfully, we might assume he isn’t finished—Currents may be a mere pit stop on the way to Tame Impala‘s yet-to-come masterpiece, but it’s a trip well worth enjoying on its own.

Interview with Red Wanting Blue [Podcast]

Red Wanting Blue is a rock n’ roll band from Columbus, Ohio. They’ve been making waves since 1996 with a steady output of albums and tours. Their frontman Scott Terry called in to the Murfie office recently to chat about the band’s experiences, including signing with a record label, and avoiding a near-fatal car crash that inspired their new album. We cover topics in the music industry of course, like transparency in the streaming business, and the paradox of choice that comes with infinite access. Scott is definitely a fan of music ownership and collecting physical music, and in fact, he points out how physical music can be an extension of your personality. He also embraces the amazing influence computers can have in creating music and reaching fans.

Here’s a transcript of our interview, along with the Soundcloud link below for your listening pleasure.

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Who: Scott Terry; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
When: Tuesday July 7th, 2015
How: via phone

K: I’ve got Scott Terry on the phone from the band Red Wanting Blue. And Scott, you just started your tour called the Our Little America Tour, how’s that going so far?

S: It’s going great, it’s going great. Actually right now we are in Columbus, Ohio, and we’re just now getting ready to make a trip up to Edmonton Alberta Canada. So we’ve got kind of a long way to go and a short time to get there.

K: Well this definitely isn’t the first time you’ve gone on a tour, and it’s going through the end of August, so I was wondering if you have any tips for going on tour, for a musician who hasn’t gone before. What do you do to get through?

S: You know what, it’s funny you say that because I have literally thought of writing a book, or like a short guide, for survival tips when you’re on the road with a rock n’ roll band. I don’t want to give away too much of my book. But I would say, if I had to give some tips to some young bands: try to avoid gas station restrooms. Usually there is a hotel off that same exit. They’re in the hospitality business, so they’re not gonna question you if you’re a guest at the hotel. You can just walk in and go straight to the lobby. That’s a Scott Terry survival tip, although we haven’t had to use that one in a little while. We’re fortunate, we’ve got a bathroom on our bus now. More important tips on the road would be: try to stay active. One of the things that we do is we try to avoid fast food, because I think it makes you feel bad. Even if it tastes good going down, you usually regret it a little bit later. Or a lot, depending. We also try to stay fit while we’re on the road. You’ve got a lot of downtime sometimes between load-in and sound check, and performing. So we’ll try to go for jogs and keep ourselves in shape, and so that’s a good thing to do. Again, I don’t want to dig too much into my stash of secrets.

K: We’ll have to keep a lookout for that book. You need to have your own hashtag, #ScottTerryTourTips. Well those are definitely helpful, staying active and eating right.

S: Yeah and it sounds lame to say it like that, but the truth is that—I don’t want to sound preachy—but we run across bands who live up to the illusion and the idea that a band that’s traveling, you know—rock n’ roll band, partying every night. At this point in my career, I think that’s a difficult thing to sustain, it’s hard to maintain that lifestyle and live like that. It’s good to cut loose every now and then, but I think ultimately, you’re going to be going from town to down, driving from cold weather conditions to hot weather conditions. You’re putting your body through a lot of sleepless nights and the schedule can be rigorous and brutal, and the best thing you can be doing for yourself in order to make it through the shows so that you’re not apologizing to your fans like “Sorry I have a sore throat, sorry I got sick,” is to—because the road will run you down, I mean it is longer than you, it will definitely run you down if you open yourself up to that—so the thing you have to try to keep in mind, is: pace yourself, and always try to stay on top of your health. That’s my fatherly tip to the young bands out there.

Red Wanting blue Little AmericaK: Right, coming from experience. I mean that’s great to hear. and you guys have experience touring, you have experience putting out a lot of albums, so I was wondering if you look back at everything you’ve done so far—I  know you have a new album out, but—considering everything, is there a certain album you’ve put out that you personally feel most connected to?

Continue reading Interview with Red Wanting Blue [Podcast]

Buy FLAC music

Look no further.

Murfie might be the largest and most diverse source of FLAC music online. Every album in our marketplace is a real CD that we rip in FLAC format and send to you digitally. We’re not like other FLAC download websites—the music you’re downloading is from physical CDs you really own. The music will remain yours as long as you wish, available for future downloads and even FLAC streaming.

How to buy FLAC music on Murfie

1. Create a free account.

2. Shop the marketplace. Sort by genre, search artists and album names, and check out our cool collections of albums.

3. Buy your album.

Fill in your billing details if you haven’t already, and your info will be saved for future purchases. We accept US credit cards, PayPal, and Bitcoin.

Murfie

4. Go to your collection and search for the album, or click “Recent Activity” on the left sidebar of your collection.

Murfie

5. Click “Delivery Options” next to the album. Choose FLAC in the drop-down menu and click “Request Download”.

Murfie FLAC download

Your download will arrive via email. You can also click “Downloads” on the left sidebar of your collection to see when your downloads are ready. Here are FAQs about downloading music on Murfie.

Helpful tip: Stream the album before you request a download, to make sure you really like it. Because if you don’t, simply return the album within 24 hours for full credit back to your account. Here are FAQs about Murfie streaming.

As you can see, it’s easy to buy FLAC music on Murfie. In addition to getting lossless audio, you get to own your music, and that can’t be beat.

Audiophile Forums

Do you love talking about music? There are some online discussion boards for music collectors and audiophiles that may be of interest to you.

Forums aren’t for trolls—they’re actually quite fun and engaging! As a growing company, we thrive on your recommendations. Please don’t forget to spread the word about Murfie as a source for FLAC music, CD ripping, low album prices, lossless streaming, and more, next time you consider sharing insights on your favorite music websites.

Here are some forums we recommend:

► Head-Fi

A meeting place for headphone hi-fi enthusiasts.

► Hydrogenaud.io

A place to discuss audio technology.

► SteveHoffman.tv

A popular spot for everything from music to hardware to visual arts.

► ComputerAudiophile

A source for computer audio and music server Information and reviews.

How To Buy Lossless Music With Bitcoin

Two things we’re fans of: lossless music and bitcoin. No doubt about it. Call us geeks, audiophiles, or what-have-you, but the recent interest in high quality files and virtual currency fits with what we’re doing at Murfie.

Here’s a how-to guide for buying lossless music with bitcoin on our site.

1. Sign up for Murfie. It’s free to sign up, and all you need is a name, email address, and password.

2. Add credit with Bitcoin. Select the desired amount of Murfie credit you’d like to buy on your billing page. You’ll be taken to BitPay to securely complete the process.

3. Shop for music. We have thousands of complete albums for just a few dollars each. Every album in the Murfie marketplace is backed by a used or new CD.

4. Download in FLAC or ALAC. Every CD at Murfie is ripped in FLAC and made available for you to download in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC.

5. Stream in FLAC. Murfie HiFi members can get CD-quality FLAC streaming on Sonos, Bluesound, and VOCO devices.

We want you to customize your own music experience. Having the option to pay with bitcoin and listen in lossless format is a wonderful thing!

Spring Cleaning Checklist: Music Collection

Spring is almost here…the official first day is March 20th! I know that most folks—especially us in Wisconsin—have been looking forward to this for months!

Spring cleaning has become a yearly tradition all over the world. It’s an opportunity to open the windows and shake the dust off everything in the house from top to bottom. It’s therapeutic—beneficial for your mind and physical health, for all kinds of reasons.

Don’t overlook your music collection when you spring clean this year. Your CDs and vinyl deserve to be checked, re-assessed, and re-organized. You may not have noticed how much your collection has grown over time, piece by piece. Here are some tips for how to sell the titles you no longer want, and breathe new life into your old favorites!

CDs

white_square_yellowDownsize. Figure out which titles are just taking up space since you don’t listen to them anymore. Order a seller’s kit to sell CDs to Murfie members, or sell your CDs directly to Murfie. You’ll earn money from each sale that can be cashed out or used in the marketplace.

white_square_yellowDigitize. Send your remaining collection to Murfie, where it will be ripped and uploaded to your personal account for high quality downloads and streams. Stream your music on the web, our apps for iOS and Android, Sonos, and even more devices. Download your music in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC to listen offline.

white_square_yellowDeclutter. Store your discs at Murfie and free up some space. Enjoy anytime/anywhere digital access to your music. Your collection will always remain yours, we’re just storing it for you along with any album art you send—and you can request your physical collection back anytime!

Vinyl 

white_square_yellowClean. Those ol’ vinyl records can become quite dusty over the years. If you send them to Murfie, we’ll use our multi-brush wet cleaning system to remove any dust that might be damaging the quality of your records.

white_square_yellowDigitize. After we clean and digitize your records, you can enjoy streaming on all your devices, and downloads in various formats. We remove pops, clicks, and background noise. Get started by ordering a vinyl kit.

white_square_yellowDeclutter. Just as we store CDs, we’ll safely store any vinyl records you leave with us while you enjoy convenient digital access. Don’t forget, they always remain yours—so request them back whenever you want!

Get organized this spring, and give your collection the cloud treatment it deserves! Get an instant quote for digitization on our CD shipping kit page and vinyl shipping kit page. As for the CDs you don’t want to hang on to anymore, order a seller’s kit to get ’em outta your house asap!

CD shipping kit
Vinyl shipping kit
Seller’s kit