Buy Music With Bitcoin

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Our big announcement last July had cryptocurrency enthusiasts buzzing: Murfie was (and still is) the largest music marketplace that accepts Bitcoin as payment.

Okay, so…why does this matter?

Bitcoin is a decentralized digital currency, so it isn’t tied to banks, gold, or specific countries at this point. If the benefit of that isn’t obvious to you, I’ll just say that it’s good to have options.

And the fact that Murfie accepts Bitcoin is huge! You can use Bitcoin to buy some things online, but it’s still catching on with retailers and consumers, slowly but surely. By accepting Bitcoin on Murfie, we’ve made hundreds of thousands of albums available to be bought using the digital currency, and we’ve opened the door for Bitcoin users to buy tons of music their preferred way. (We’re talking about a huge door opening, like a barn door. Or an airplane hangar.)

To buy Murfie credit using Bitcoin, visit the billing page in your account. Then, head over to our holiday gifts page and music marketplace and find something you like! Every CD you buy comes with unlimited 320kbps streaming, and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless.

How To Promote Your Murfie Shop

Putting your CD collection up for sale on Murfie is fun, but actually selling your collection is even more fun! And promoting your personal shop using Facebook, Twitter and Craigslist is a great way to do just that.

Facebook

If Facebook is your forte, all you have to do is locate your shop URL on your profile page and then include that URL in any statuses you post about your collection.

Twitter

If Twitter is more your cup of tea, again simply find your shop URL on your profile page and include it in any subsequent tweets you make about the albums you’re selling.

Craigslist

Craigslist is another fantastic way to promote your personal shop, especially because posting an ad to Craigslist doesn’t cost a cent.

To set up your shop, go to http://www.craigslist.org/about/sites. Then, select the city in which you want your ad to be posted. Keep in mind that you can only post in one city.

Next, you’ll want to click “post to classifieds,” which is in the upper left corner of Craigslist’s homepage. You’ll then want to choose the “for sale” option for your posting type, and the “cds/dvds/vhs” option for your posting category.

After you’ve completed the set up, fill out the posting form with a unique title and description. Be sure to include your shop’s URL in the description, as well as what music you’re selling.

Once you’ve submitted your post, you’ll be sent an email with a link that allows you to make any last minute changes to your posting, if needed. Craigslist also allows you to repost your ad every 48 hours.

Selling CDs

With the right mix of promotion and quality albums for sale, you’ll have a recipe for success, and some money in the bank!

Learn More

How to Sell CDs on Murfie: The All-Encompassing Guide

 
It’s happened to the best of us: You’re scrolling through your Murfie collection, and bam!, you realize you’ve wound up with two copies of CarpentersThe Singles: 1969-1973; or you’re an ex-Beatles, newly-converted Stones fan, and you’re finally ready to ditch your once cherished copy of Revolver.

Well, here’s great news for you: Not only can you store your CD collection with Murfie, but you can sell it, too.

Selling Your CDs

Once you’ve made the decision that you’re ready to sell some CDs, the process is simple. To begin, sign in to murfie.com and click “Your Collection” on the header.

You’ll now see your prized Murfie collection. Once you’ve scrolled through your albums and found the one you’d like to sell, look to the right of the album’s artwork. If the album hasn’t been downloaded or shipped, you’ll see an area titled “View Selling Options.”

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Once you’ve clicked “View Selling Options,” a range of dollar values will appear.

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From here, you can select any dollar amount that you want to sell your CD for. At Murfie, we recommend that you put your CD for sale at the lowest price that it’s currently selling for. To find out what this lowest value is, simply move your peepers up two lines above the selling options to the where it says “Selling for.” This section will show you the current low and a high selling prices. If you’re lucky enough to be the only seller of your particular CD, however, this “Selling for” area will instead read, “Be the only seller!”

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After you’ve selected your desired price, check the “For Sale” box. Congratulations! You now have an album for sale.

Do you want to save time and avoid pricing your own discs? Email info@murfie.com and ask for Easy Price. We’ll automatically price your CDs at a fair market value, and you should see sales almost immediately.

What To Expect After Your CD Has Sold

The first thing to do after you’ve sold a CD on Murfie is to congratulate yourself. High five your cat, pat yourself on the back or pop that bottle of bubbly—you sold a CD!

In your account balance, you’ll notice that you’ve received credit for 70% of the listed price of your CD. Murfie keeps the other 30% as commission. Any credit you earn from the sale, however, is yours to use: You can either put that credit to good use by buying other CDs, or you can cash it out as a check.

To cash your credit, click on your name in the upper left corner of the site, and select “Shipping” from the drop-down menu. After you’ve filled out your shipping info, head over to “Balance,” which can be found in the same drop-down menu. If you have a positive balance, you’ll see a green button that says “Request Check.” And once you’ve clicked that button, your balance will change back to $0 and you’ll receive your check within 2 weeks.

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Don’t Forget

Once you’ve sold your CD on Murfie, you will no longer be able to access that particular disc for streaming or downloading, since the buyer now owns that disc. If it helps, think of Murfie as a used record store, but online—and even better!

Last Call: Your Murfie Week in Review


Monday 8/28—

[Blog] Grant gave us a dose of cool: soul jazz musician Grant Green.

Tuesday 8/29—

[Blog] We previewed Sand + Silence by folk duo The Rosebuds.
[Twitter] Our developer Marc leaked info about a cool new feature on mobile.

Wednesday 8/30—

[Blog] Wishy Wednesday happened in full force.
[Twitter] A Murfie member admitted his Creed CDs were on sale for $0.

Thursday 8/31—

[Blog] We previewed Spoon’s upcoming rock album, They Want My Soul.
[Facebook] The Murfie Genie delighted a few members with album gifts.
[Blog] Two words: Music History. (Learn up, people!)
[Twitter] Pixologie had fun visiting the Murfie office!

Friday 9/1—

[Twitter] We wished blues guitarist Robert Cray a Happy Birthday.

Music for Your Workout

Nothing calls for the right music quite like an intense workout. Here are three of my picks to help get you through it!

Daft Punk Random Access MemoriesDaft Punk
Random Access Memories

Daft Punk is known to always deliver a surprise, and their latest work is no exception. The surprises began when one of the world’s best-know and best-loved Electronic Dance Music artists released an album that was much more ’70s/’80s pop, rock and disco  than it was EDM. As the opening track states, this album is a breath of fresh air; a work that announced its mission was to “Give Life Back to Music”.

The overall production quality of this album is absolutely superb; Daft Punk cut no corners on creating their latest statement. Although their music and instrumentals are fantastic, the real standout is their collaborations with artists they admire. Rather than pigeonholing themselves by working only with a certain type of artist, Daft Punk collaborates with artists young and old, spanning numerous genres, to create a truly well-rounded and interesting product. From Nile Rodgers’ and Pharrell’s turns in “Lose Yourself to Dance” and “Get Lucky” to vocals by famed house DJ Todd Edwards, Daft Punk proves themselves open to a range of influences.

Although the first half of the album gets off to a strong start with tracks like “Giorgio”, Random Access Memories comes alive in its second half. Cuts like “Touch” and “Contact” remind you why Daft Punk stole our hearts in the first place. “Get Lucky” may have been blaring through your speakers all year, but I promise: there’s workout gold–and musical gold–to be found in spades here.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Beyond”, “Touch”

Nas IllmaticNas
Illmatic

In 1994, 20-year-old Nas released an album that garnered very little attention. Fast forward 20 years (can you believe it?), and the up-and-coming rapper who wasn’t old enough to buy a beer is now one of hip-hop’s greatest stars. In those 20 years, Illmatic has become massively acclaimed; it is without a doubt one of the greatest (if not the greatest, but I’m showing my bias) rap albums ever released, and is a welcome counterpart to any workout.

This album is Nas’ homage to the Bridge, the housing projects where he was raised. True to its influence, it brought hip-hope back to New York in the days after West Coast star Dr. Dre released The Chronic. Most importantly, however, it casts Nas as a street poet, the voice of a generation. He narrates his story in a simple but thoughtful way, letting us in on the difficulties of life without losing hope. Nas is a storyteller: with each song’s end comes an unanswered question that leaves you waiting for the next.

My only complaint about this album is its brevity; less than 40 minutes feels like nowhere near long enough. You’ll find yourself on a run, inspired by each and every track, only to have the music end by around mile five. When I’m out running, though, I don’t skip to the next album. I just repeat it. This one’s that good.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “N.Y. State of Mind”, “The World is Yours”

David Guetta Nothing But the BeatDavid Guetta
Nothing But the Beat

You probably know David Guetta as the guy who brought techno sound to the records of everyone from Rihanna to Usher. There’s nothing more workout-inspiring than some guilty-pleasure Top 40 music, and Guetta is the mastermind behind many of today’s top hits. This album, however, proves that he’s not just the man behind the scenes–he’s created tracks that will take you from a run to a night out and back again.

Guetta does a great job of blending genres together to create an effortlessly smooth final product. His signature house-music inspired techno beats somehow fuse together with hip-hop and R&B, creating an irresistible mix of workout-worth sound. This album is nothing groundbreaking, but you can’t deny Guetta’s influence: from Will.i.am to Nicki Minaj to Usher, Nothing But the Beat boasts a star-studded turnout of collaborations.

Where Guetta shines brightest is bringing an artist into his or her element. Whether it’s lending a romantic club beat to crooner Usher or a pulsing, fast-paced rhyme to Nicki Minaj, he knows how to draw artists out and make them shine. That’s what makes this album memorable–Guetta has taken household names and helped them make their best a little bit better.

Don’t Miss Tracks: “Titanium”, “Turn Me On”


Ally Boutelle
@arboutelle

Ally is a communications intern at Murfie, blogging about all things music. When she’s not typing away, she cooks spicy food, does hot yoga, and reads weird history books. She’s also a college student double majoring in history and journalism.


#FreeFriday: Legend

Time for our fourth edition of #FreeFriday! Each week we’ll review an album, and give it away to one lucky winner. For a chance to win the album, all you have to do is read this post, then share on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share this blog post on Twitter—use the hashtag #FreeFriday and tag @murfiemusic
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share our #FreeFriday Facebook post (in a public post)

Now, on to this week’s featured album…

Bob Marley & the Wailers - LegendLegend (Bob Marley & the Wailers, 1984)

Legend is an incredible album that can easily be the catalyst for a lifetime love of reggae music. One of the most widely distributed reggae albums in the world, Legend showcases a variety of songs by the foundational roots reggae band Bob Marley & the Wailers.

This “Best Of” collection came about after the band had established themselves as international roots reggae rockers. It was released after the departure of Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer from the band (Bob, Peter, and Bunny were the forefront of the group) and after Bob’s untimely death due to cancer. By the time this tracklist was put together, the I-Threes had been added to the band as backup vocalists (Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt and Marcia Griffiths, each successful solo artists in their own right), and for that reason you get a wide variety of recordings. For this album, the curator chose the band’s later recordings which have a popular appeal to people who generally enjoy rock n’ roll, soul, and R&B. (This can be contrasted to the earlier, more Rocksteady years, when the band worked with the incredibly genius, and slightly mad producer, Lee “Scratch” Perry).

Legend contains everything from uplifting, radiantly positive roots reggae songs like “Is This Love” and “One Love” to the more disco and dance-oriented “Could You Be Loved.” It contains the lighthearted acoustic ballad “Redemption Song” and the heavy, protest-themed “Get Up Stand Up” featuring Peter Tosh’s militant-sounding vocals. This album made me fall in love with the vast, deep diverse ocean of reggae music, and I know you will love it too.

Share this post in one of the ways listed above for a chance to win a copy of Legend, and we’ll let you know if you’re the winner next week! Good luck!


Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


This Week in Music History (May 28th-June 3rd)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

Oops I did it again5/28- On this day in 2000, Britney Spears topped the new millenium’s album chart with Oops!…I Did It Again. The album sold 1,319,000 copies in its first week and went on to reach No.1 in thirteen other countries. To date, it has sold over 20 million copies.

365447-large5/29- On this day in 1942, Bing Crosby recorded the Irving Berlin song “White Christmas” with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra and the Ken Darby Singers. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Crosby’s version is the best-selling single of all time, with sales to date topping 50 million.

Beatles5/30- On this day in 1964, The Beatles‘ single “Love Me Do” reached No.1 on the US singles chart, the group’s fourth US No.1 in five months’ time. Although the single was originally released in the United Kingdom in October 1962, it did not become a hit in the United States until 1964.

114141-large5/31- On this day in 1977, The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) announced a ban on the new Sex Pistols single “God Save the Queen”. Although the single reached No.2 on the UK chart, the BBC declared it to be “in gross bad taste” and considered it to be an assault on Queen Elizabeth II and the monarchy. Lead singer Johnny Rotten, however, explained, “You don’t write ‘God Save the Queen’ because you hate the English race. You write a song like that because you love them and you’re fed up with them being mistreated.”

32093-large6/1- On this day in 1968, Simon & Garfunkel went to No.1 on the US singles chart with “Mrs. Robinson”. An early version of the song was featured in the film The Graduate, starring Dustin Hoffmann and Ann Bancroft. It was then re-recorded to be released as a single, which went on to win the duo a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

7400-large6/2- On this day in 1984, British duo Wham! had their first No.1 hit with “Wake Me Up Before You Go Go”. The song was written and produced by British musician George Michael, who was one half of the duo. Michael’s inspiration for the song was a note his Wham! partner Andrew Ridgeley had left for his parents which read “Wake me up up before you go go”.

13293-large6/3- On this day in 1967, soul legend Aretha Franklin hit No.1 on the US singles chart with her cover of Otis Redding‘s hit song “Respect”. Although the two versions were musically very similar, Aretha’s version added the famous R-E-S-P-E-C-T chorus and backup singers’ refrain of “Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me…”

Find these musical gems in our CD marketplace, and own your own pieces of music history! Every album purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC. :-)