This Week in Music History (March 5th-11th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

3/5- On this day in 1983, Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” started a seven-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart. The song was his fourth solo No.1 in the United States, and also went to No.1 in the United Kingdom.

3/6- On this day in 1965, The Temptations became the first male group to have a No.1 hit for Motown with their single “My Girl”, written by Smokey Robinson.

3/7- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin appeared at the Bluesville 69 Club at the Hornsey Wood Tavern, Finsbury Park, in London. The venue was a tiny room in back of the pub, with a stage that was so small that only the drum set fit onstage. The rest of the group was forced to stand on the floor with the crowd.

3/8- On this day in 2008, China began to impose tighter regulations on foreign pop stars after singer Björk caused a controversy by screaming “Tibet, Tibet” after performing her song “Declare Independence” at her concert in Shanghai.

3/9- On this day in 1991, British punk band The Clash scored their only UK No.1 single with “Should I Stay or Should I Go”. The song shot to popularity after it was used in a Levi’s TV advertisement.

3/10- On this day in 1964, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel recorded “The Sounds of Silence” as an acoustic duet. The song did not become a hit until late 1965, when record company producers added electric guitar, drums and bass to the track.

3/11– On this day in 2008, Madonna was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at a ceremony in New York City. The singer thanked her detractors in her acceptance speech, particularly those who “said I couldn’t sing, that I was a one-hit wonder”.

Pick up these pieces of music history in our CD marketplace! Every album you own comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless! :-)

This Week in Music History (December 4th-10th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

12/4- On this day in 1964, The Beatles released their fourth studio album, Beatles for Sale. The album, which featured tracks like “Eight Days a Week” and “Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby”, spent 11 weeks at the top of the UK charts.

12/5- On this day in 1968, the Rolling Stones hosted a party in London to celebrate the release of their new album Beggar’s Banquet. Although Keith Richards was sick and unable to attend, the rest of the band and their guests participated in a custard pie food fight that became the highlight of the event.

12/6- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin made their debut on the US singles chart. The single, “Whole Lotta Love”, went on to become the first of six Top 40 singles for the band in the United States.

12/7- On this day in 1967, Otis Redding went in to the studio to record “(Sittin’ On) the Dock of the Bay”. The track went on to be his all-time biggest hit. Redding, however, would never see the single’s success; he died in a plane crash just days later on December 10, 1967.

12/8- On this day in 1961, The Beach Boys’ first single, “Surfin’”, was released on Candix Records, a small record label based in Los Angeles. The song became extremely popular in Southern California, and the band was soon signed to Capitol Records.

12/9-  On this day in 1967, The Doors played at the New Haven Arena in New Haven, Connecticut. Before the show began, police caught frontman Jim Morrison kissing a girl in a backstage shower. Morrison mocked the incident onstage, and was dragged off and arrested by police.

12/10- On this day in 1983, Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson began a six-week run at No. 1 on the US singles chart with “Say Say Say”. The song was Jackson’s 10th No. 1 hit and McCartney’s 29th.

Check out our marketplace, where you can buy albums that made music history! Unlimited downloads (mp3, aac, FLAC, Apple Lossless) and streaming included with every purchase.

Sonos PLAY:1 + Murfie

Our co-founder Preston and his wife Julie recently tried out the Sonos PLAY:1 with their Murfie collection, and they (and their cat Tonka) just love it! (Really—he just won’t shut up about it!)

We decided to create a package deal so that more people can experience the awesomeness of Murfie with Sonos. We’re giving you the best price available for this amazing piece of home listening equipment, and a rockin’ Murfie starter package to go with it. It’s the perfect holiday gift for yourself, or for a friend who you want to introduce to the awesomeness!

Here are the sweet details about our Sonos: Play 1+ Murfie package*, with an updated price (we’re sorry—the price we mentioned earlier today was incorrect). This is only available for a limited time!

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*Update (5/6/14): This offer no longer comes with a free Sonos Bridge. Email info@murfie.com if you would like to add a Bridge to your Sonos PLAY:1 + Murfie package.

“Are you paying more for digital songs and albums than you need to?” Murfie says yes.

According to a recent comparison made by Mark Harris, buyers of digital music online save a significant amount of money when they purchase music from an alternate source than iTunes—like Amazon, for example.

How significant are those savings? We have some data that blows both iTunes and Amazon out of the water. When comparing the prices of 50 popular albums from a variety of genres on iTunes, Amazon, and murfie.com, and breaking it down by individual track price as well, Murfie has the lowest prices across the board.

For the following chart, we pulled the lowest album price from each of the three services, whether it was new or used: [View Price Comparison Chart Here]

You’d save $305.53 if you bought these 50 albums on Murfie over iTunes, and $159.87 and $246.48 if you chose Murfie over Amazon for physical albums and mp3 downloads, respectively. That’s 172% more you’re spending on 50 iTunes albums than Murfie albums, 90% more on Amazon CDs, and 138% more on Amazon mp3 albums.

An important thing to note is that when you buy an album on Murfie, you’re buying a real, physical CD stored at Murfie headquarters. From there, the innovative Murfie platform allows you to instantly access the music on your CD anyway you’d like: as downloads in your choice of formats (mp3, aac, FLAC, ALAC), via unlimited streaming (320kbps mp3 via website, iOS app, Android app, Sonos, VOCO), via delivery of the physical disc, or a combination of all of these.

As noted on the chart, some artists don’t even have downloads for sale on iTunes or Amazon. Since every album purchase on Murfie is backed by a real CD, you can download and stream music by these artists.

So what can you do with such significant savings? Buy more great music!

At the average cost of $3.56 per album on Murfie, you could get 85 more albums if you chose Murfie over iTunes, 44 more albums if you chose Murfie over Amazon CDs, and 69 more albums if you chose Murfie over Amazon mp3s.

If you don’t think Murfie’s prices can get any lower, think again. With a Murfie Gold or Murfie HiFi membership, you can save an extra $1 per album in the Murfie marketplace.

Albums come and go quickly at Murfie, and these prices were noted on 11/5/13. Visit murfie.com to buy CDs online and get unlimited streaming and downloads of your collection.