Sell CDs Without Art and Cases

When we talked to one of our Murfie members, Mike, a few months ago and asked how he discovered our service, his intentions were very precise: “I am a CD seller and have sold tens of thousands over the internet, so I was looking for an outlet for those that I get that are missing artwork.

In an article for PC Magazine, author Damon Poeter notes that “Amazon, like other online buyers of used CDs, wants the jewel boxes and cover art included in your original purchase from way back when. Scratched discs will likely be rejected, as well.

So what about your CDs with misplaced artwork? What about the CD cases you’ve thrown away when you decided to move all the album art and discs into one of those snazzy CD binders? It’s totally realistic to assume that not everyone has kept their entire CD collection 100% intact over the years, for one reason or another.

At Murfie, we’ll accept all your CDs! If your Crash album by Dave Matthews is missing the back art, or Tigerlily by Natalie Merchant is all scratched up from sliding around your dashboard, it’s going to be ok! Say it with me: It’s—going—to—be—O—K.

Here’s why:

  • We use AccurateRip technology and scratch repair tools to get excellent CD-quality digital rips of your albums
  • The discs are stored in paper sleeves in our warehouse, so all plastic CD cases are recycled anyway
  • Murfie (coming from the acronym MRF: Material Recycling Facility) is all about taking CDs off your hands, storing them on our shelves instead of yours, and converting them to the digital age!

Neat, huh? All you have to do is order a Shipping Kit to get started. We’ll convert your CDs to digital files, and post your collection online for you to view and manage. Your CDs can be sold in your personal shop, downloaded (FLAC, ALAC, mp3, aac), streamed (at home or on the go with our apps), or traded for new ones!

Staff Picks: Top Albums for Lossless Listening (FLAC & ALAC)

One of my favorite aspects of Murfie is the ability to download my albums in lossless formats.  I personally prefer FLAC, but ALAC is an equally great option.  I was super excited, then, to hear about our partnership to allow lossless streaming on Sonos and VOCO devices.

Now that I have the ability to stream in full, lossless CD quality, I thought it would be fun to recommend a few albums that are particularly great for lossless listening.  This list was put together largely by consulting mixing and mastering insiders.  These are albums often used by studio engineers as standards for how a particular genre may sound at peak performance.  With that said, grab a good pair of headphones or hook up your Sonos or VOCO and relax!

12912-largeSea Change by Beck was mastered by Bob Ludwig, one of the most respected mastering engineers around.  In addition to working on Sea Change, Ludwig has worked with over 1300 artists, including the Kronos Quartet, Nirvana, Led Zeppelin, Radiohead and more.  Sea Change does a great job of pumping out clear dynamics without falling too far into the trenches of the Loudness War.  Particularly of note here are the vocal and drum captures.

21411-largeAnother great piece of work by Bob Ludwig is New Favorite by Alison Krauss + Union Station. This album is noted for great clarity in vocals, maintaining solid, crisp levels for the rest of the sonic space, too.  Everything is mixed into a great soft texture that will fill up any room.  A lot of the popularity of this album – which charted on Billboard for both Country and Bluegrass categories – comes from the fact that Alison Krauss also appeared on the exceedingly popular O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack the same year as New Favorite debuted.

6675-largeWith over 10 million sales across all albums, Deep Forest is perhaps one of the most popular world music groups around.  Their debut self-titled Deep Forest album accounts for nearly a third of those 10 million sales alone.  Deep Forest was mastered by Vlado Meller at Sony’s New York studios, and it demonstrates a wide range of sonic qualities, all mastered together as one cohesive unit.  If you want some good sounding lossless reverb, this is the album for you.  Though the group is still active, the only album to outsell their debut has been 1995’s Boheme, with over 4 million sales worldwide.

59377-largeGeorge Duke was a master and pioneer of the keyboard, dominating the world of jazz, as well as mainstream music.  Unfortunately, Duke passed away earlier this month, but his legacy is huge to say the least.  Many of Duke’s newer recordings were mastered by John Vestman and mixed by Erik Zobler, and are used as reference discs for how keyboards should sound.  Duke’s solid arrangements make for very clear, wide recordings that sound great on headphones or high-end systems.  I personally recommend CoolIs Love Enough? and Dukey Treats.

Now that you have some of my picks for lossless listening, I’d like to hear yours!  What album(s) do you think sound the best, particularly in a lossless format?  Leave a comment below, and we’ll give it a spin at Murfie HQ.