How to ship CDs you buy directly to Murfie

Our goal is to help you grow your music collection. If an album is out of stock, click the “Find it for me!” button and we’ll try to locate a copy for you.

If an album isn’t showing in your search results at all, email us at info@murfie.com and we’ll try to find you a copy.

If you can’t acquire an album those ways, we still have you covered! You can buy CDs elsewhere online and ship them directly to your Murfie collection.

When you buy a CD through another retailer, simply put Murfie’s warehouse address, your name, and your User ID in the shipping address. You can find that info in the proper format on your Profile Page (Look under “Direct Shipments To Your Murfie Collection”).

This service is meant for the occasional shipments of CDs you can’t find in our member shops. If you are shipping CDs you acquire in bulk (more than 3 CDs at once, or more than 10 per month), we add them to your collection at our standard kit rate.

After we receive your CDs, we’ll post the files online and email you when they’re ready to stream and download!

Interview with Zoë Keating

Photo credit: Chase Jarvis

Zoë Keating is a renowned cellist who uses technology to loop tracks and enhance her live and recorded music performances. Her songs tell stories without words—and luckily we have this interview to make up for that! Read on to learn more about Zoë, in her own words. :-)

(This interview was perviously recorded as a podcast back in January 2014. You can listen to the audio version here.)

[MUSIC: “Optimist” by Zoë Keating]

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast. A few days ago, I had the pleasure of meeting Zoë Keating at her show in Madison. Zoë is a world-famous cellist who’s crafted a bunch of scores, in addition to playing with musicians like Amanda Palmer and DJ Shadow. Zoë creates amazing layered compositions by looping cello tracks with her laptop. Not only was her show incredible, but her personality is great, and she told the audience funny stories between songs. Here’s a recording of the interview we had backstage at the theater.

Kayla: So, I’m at the Majestic in downtown Madison right now with Zoë Keating—thank you so much for talking with me today, Zoë.

Zoë: Oh, you’re welcome.

Kayla: I’m excited for the show, first of all. Um, did you just arrive today in Madison?

Zoë: Yeah, like two hours ago [laughs].

Kayla: Okay—what do you think of the cold? It’s finally over zero.

Zoë: You know, I arrived in Minnesota the day after the polar vortex left, so that was pretty darn cold…and in comparison, it feels pretty warm now.

Kayla: Yes!

Zoë: I think it’s like fifteen degrees outside, and it feels lovely.

Kayla and Zoë: [Laugh]

Kayla: I know! Who would have thought we would appreciate fifteen degrees. But you’re from Canada, is that right?

Continue reading Interview with Zoë Keating

The Top 5 Most-Wished-For Albums on Murfie

Pinky the Murfie Genie comes bearing some important knowledge: Out of all the album wishes on Murfie, there are five albums that are wished for the most. With so many people wishing for them, Pinky is wondering who will grab them first.

#5. Fleetwood Mac – Rumours

Fleetwood Mac - Rumours

Year: 1977

Genre: Pop/Rock

Allmusic Review: “Rumours is the kind of album that transcends its origins and reputation, entering the realm of legend—it’s an album that simply exists outside of criticism and outside of its time, even if it thoroughly captures its era.”

 #4. Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon

Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon

Year: 1973

Genre: Pop/Rock

Allmusic Review: “…what gives the album true power is the subtly textured music, which evolves from ponderous, neo-psychedelic art rock to jazz fusion and blues-rock before turning back to psychedelia. It’s dense with detail, but leisurely paced, creating its own dark, haunting world.”

 #3. Dr. Dre – The Chronic

Dr. Dre - The Chronic

Year: 1992

Genre: Rap

Allmusic Review: “What’s impressive is that Dre crafts tighter singles than his inspiration, George Clinton—he’s just as effortlessly funky, and he has a better feel for a hook, a knack that improbably landed gangsta rap on the pop charts. But none of The Chronic’s legions of imitators were as rich in personality, and that’s due in large part to Dre’s monumental discovery, Snoop Doggy Dog.”

#2. Nirvana – Nevermind

Nirvana - Nevermind

Year: 1991

Genre: Pop/Rock

Allmusic Review: “…but no matter how much anguish there is on Nevermind, it’s bracing because [Kurt Cobain] exorcizes those demons through his evocative wordplay and mangled screams—and because the band has a tremendous, unbridled power that transcends the pain, turning into pure catharsis.”

#1. Adele – 21

Adele - 21
Year: 2011

Genre: Pop/Rock

Allmusic Review: “…the best thing the album does is to showcase Adele’s titanic vocal ability, which—more than a few times on 21—is simply spine-tingling.”

 

 

 

It’s time to make your wishes a reality! Head to our music marketplace and pick up these gems—each CD purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in your choice of format: mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC. :-)

This Week in Music History (January 8th-14th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/8- On this day in 196, The Rolling Stones‘ Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were barred from the Hotel Crillen in Lima, Peru. The rockers were asked to leave the exclusive hotel after hotel staff spotted them wearing op art pants and noting else. When they refused to change, the two were kicked out.

1/9- On this day in 1976, Queen shot to the top of the UK singles chart with “Bohemian Rhapsody”. The single, which enjoyed a nine-week run on the British chart and sold more than a million copies in a month, would go on to become the UK’s third best selling single of all time.

1/10- On this day in 1964, the first US Beatles album, Introducing…the Beatleswas released on Vee-Jay records.The album, featuring a photo of the Fab Four with their famous “mop top” haircuts, sold over 1.3 million copies that year.

1/11- On this day in 1964, Johnny Cash’s Ring of Fire became the first country album to hit No. 1 on the US album chart. Although Cash released dozens of albums during his career, the album remains among his most famous of all time.

1/12– On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin‘s self-titled debut album was released in the United Kingdom. The album, which was recorded in London, took only about 36 hours of studio time to complete. It spent a total of 71 weeks on the UK chart.

1/13- On this day in 1969, Elvis Presley began the first day of a 10-day recording session that would result in his final US No. 1 record, Suspicious Minds. The session took place at American Sound Studios in Memphis, Tennessee–the first time Presley had recorded in his hometown since 1956.

1/14- On this day in 1967, over 25,000 people attended the Human Be-In event at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. The concert was a forerunner of many of today’s major outdoor concerts, and featured artists like The Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane.

You can own any of these or other music history gems—just head to our music marketplace and pick them out! All albums purchases include: CD, streaming, and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless.

This Week in Music History (January 1st-7th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/1- On this day in 1960, Johnny Cash played a famous free concert for the inmates of San Quentin Prison in California. The recording of the concert was released as At San Quentin, Cash’s 31st album.

1/2- On this day in 1971, George Harrison’s album All Things Must Pass began a seven-week run at No. 1 on the US album chart. The spot made Harrison the first Beatle to score a No. 1 solo album.

1/3- On this day in 1976, Bob Dylan’s song “Hurricane” peaked at the No. 33 spot on the Billboard singles chart. The song received enough publicity to eventually get Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, a former boxer, released from prison. The song was written to promote Carter’s innocence.

1/4- On this day in 1967, The Jimi Hendrix Experience played the first of what would be over 240 shows of that year. The band’s appearance on January 4th was at the Bromel Club in Bromley, England.

1/5- On this day in 1973, Bruce Springsteen released his debut album, Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. The album, which was recorded in a single week, only sold about 25,000 copies in its first year.

1/6- On this day in 1975, the mayor of Boston canceled a Led Zeppelin concert after 2,000 fans rioted while trying to buy tickets. The riot caused an estimated $50,000-$75,000 in damage to the venue.

1/7- On this day in 1971, Black Sabbath released Paranoid, their second studio album in the US. The album included songs that would go on to become the band’s signatures, including “Iron Man” and “War Pigs”.

You can own any of these or other music history gems—just head to our music marketplace and pick them out! All albums purchases include: CD, streaming, and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless.

This Week in Music History (December 4th-10th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

12/4- On this day in 1964, The Beatles released their fourth studio album, Beatles for Sale. The album, which featured tracks like “Eight Days a Week” and “Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby”, spent 11 weeks at the top of the UK charts.

12/5- On this day in 1968, the Rolling Stones hosted a party in London to celebrate the release of their new album Beggar’s Banquet. Although Keith Richards was sick and unable to attend, the rest of the band and their guests participated in a custard pie food fight that became the highlight of the event.

12/6- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin made their debut on the US singles chart. The single, “Whole Lotta Love”, went on to become the first of six Top 40 singles for the band in the United States.

12/7- On this day in 1967, Otis Redding went in to the studio to record “(Sittin’ On) the Dock of the Bay”. The track went on to be his all-time biggest hit. Redding, however, would never see the single’s success; he died in a plane crash just days later on December 10, 1967.

12/8- On this day in 1961, The Beach Boys’ first single, “Surfin’”, was released on Candix Records, a small record label based in Los Angeles. The song became extremely popular in Southern California, and the band was soon signed to Capitol Records.

12/9-  On this day in 1967, The Doors played at the New Haven Arena in New Haven, Connecticut. Before the show began, police caught frontman Jim Morrison kissing a girl in a backstage shower. Morrison mocked the incident onstage, and was dragged off and arrested by police.

12/10- On this day in 1983, Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson began a six-week run at No. 1 on the US singles chart with “Say Say Say”. The song was Jackson’s 10th No. 1 hit and McCartney’s 29th.

Check out our marketplace, where you can buy albums that made music history! Unlimited downloads (mp3, aac, FLAC, Apple Lossless) and streaming included with every purchase.

This Week in Music History (November 13th-19th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

11/13- On this day in 1964, The Rolling Stones’ single “Little Red Rooster” was released by Decca Records. The single, which had previously been recorded by Sam Cooke, was a No.1 hit in the UK—the only time a blues song has ever topped the UK pop chart.

11/14- On this day in 1960, Ray Charles shot to No.1 on the United States singles chart with his track “Georgia on My Mind”. The song became the first of three No.1 hits for Charles.

11/15- On this day in 1966, The Doors signed with Elektra Records in a deal to produce seven albums. The band agreed to release “Break on Through” as its first single, but was forced to edit the lyrics to secure radio play.

11/16- On this day in 1968, The Jimi Hendrix Experience went No.1 on the US album chart with Electric Ladyland. The album included popular tracks like “Crosstown Traffic” and “All Along the Watchtower”.

11/17- On this day in 1973, The Who’s famous double album Quadrophenia peaked at No.2 on the UK album charts. Along with 1969’s Tommy, Quadrophenia was one of two full-scale rock operas released by the band.

11/18- On this day in 1978, Billy Joel rose to No.1 on the US album chart with 52nd Street, his sixth studio album. It was Joel’s first album to top the Billboard charts and would go on to earn him two Grammys. On October 1, 1982, the album became the first to be commercially released on compact disc by Sony Music Entertainment.

11/19- On this day in 1955, Carl Perkins recorded “Blue Suede Shoes” at Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. The classic track became a No.2 hit on the US charts for Perkins in 1956, and went on to be covered by artists like Elvis Presley.

Oh, so you wanna own any of these gems, or download in lossless formats? Check out these albums and more pieces of music history in our marketplace!