Ownership Matters: What Apple Music users and Jim Dalrymple should know

“This is Apple Music. And it’s just the beginning.”

Apple’s website tells all: a single user can subscribe to their new streaming service, Apple Music, for $9.99/month. Though it is in fact just beginning, the new service has been met with a cascade of criticism.

Users reported some major hiccups with the service, including the iCloud Music Library aspect, which is meant to bring your iTunes library onto all your devices for you to stream anywhere. Users were reporting duplicate songs, songs that were moved to the wrong album, and missing songs.

Apple blogger Jim Dalrymple’s situation was particularly upsetting. When he was having complications with Apple Music, he decided to turn it off on his devices, resulting in what looked like 4,700 songs disappearing from his view. It’s reason to panic indeed, although Apple Music technically does not alter any of the original song files stored on your PC or other locations.

If your music “disappears”, whether permanently or temporarily, it’s important to have a backup just in case. Choosing to buy physical music that you own saves you from losing files, and from being at the mercy of a large music service, which are both terrifying things.

When you buy a CD on Murfie for example, we’ll give you the download to add to your iTunes, and streaming access you can take anywhere. If something happens to your files, whether it’s your fault or Apple’s, you’ll always have a perfect archive of all the music you own, ready to be downloaded again at any time. If you don’t want to hang on to the CD, we’ll hang on to it for you.

If you choose ownership, you will always have access, and there will be no need to worry. This is something that all Apple users, including Jim Dalrymple, should hopefully know—and we’d love to have them try us out!

Announcing super low-res downloads on Murfie!

We are pleased as punch to deliver yet another option to listen to your music however you want: Low-res downloads!

Why limit you to “high quality” music when there’s a whole spectrum of quality out there? Now, in addition to 320kbps mp3, aac, and lossless FLAC and ALAC downloads on Murfie, you’ll see a new option called “4-bit 16khz” which is available to you at no extra cost.

Expert tip: The download process for this works best on Internet Explorer!

Who needs quality when you can literally compress your music collection so small that it fits on your new iPhone 6 in its entirety? Just click the orange button to learn more!

Is hi-res audio worth the price?

As Onkyo plans to expand its hi-res music store to the US, it’s time to decide if hi-res downloads are worth paying more for than CD-quality files.

In recent times, we’ve seen more focus on the quality of music files online. For music lovers who enjoy digital music, this is a welcome change. Folks like musician Neil Young are taking a stance against the low-quality downloads that consumers are used to getting from online stores like iTunes.

“We live in the digital age, and unfortunately it’s degrading our music, not improving,” said Young.

To combat crappy digital music, Young launched his Pono device and its corresponding hi-res audio store online. Now, Japanese consumer electronics company Onkyo is planning to expand its hi-res audio store, e-Onkyo Music, to the US, and hopefully tap into the same audiophile market that prefers purchasing higher quality files.

CD-quality audio is better than low-quality files, and hi-res audio is considered to be even better than CD-quality audio in terms of bandwidth and dynamic rage. But when the two are compared in listening tests, even to high-bitrate mp3s, a lot of people can’t hear the difference. For this reason, the question of whether hi-res is truly “better” for listeners than CD-quality is still under debate. (Try comparing them for yourself!)

So how much do places like Onkyo and Pono charge for a hi-res album in FLAC format? Here’s an example, compared to the price on murfie.com for CD-quality FLAC.

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Pono eOnkyo Murfie
quality 48kHz/24bit 48kHz/24bit 44.1kHz/16bit
price $22.99 ~$31.00 $16.00

The Diana Krall album is a new release. How about building your back catalogue with an old favorite?

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Pono eOnkyo Murfie
quality 192.0kHz/24bit 192kHz/24bit 44.1kHz/16bit
price  $24.79  ~$30.00  $3.00

High-quality music is great, but it would be outrageous to pay for a hi-res album if you can’t hear the difference between that and CD-quality audio, which is already high. Some have even claimed that the hi-res movement is profitable trickery aimed at elitists and audiophiles.

Ultimately the choice is up to you, the listener. Find out what you can hear—and can’t hear—and make the choice that makes sense for you. When you choose to buy an album from Murfie, you’re buying a real CD that you can download (FLAC, ALAC, mp3, aac) and stream on different devices (320kbps mp3 or FLAC). Then choose to store the physical disc with us, or have it shipped to you.

For us, quality is key, along with providing access to your music that isn’t limited by any brand or device. Since everything released on CD can be ripped and downloaded in FLAC, Murfie just might be the largest source of high-quality FLAC music online. See for yourself!

How to ship CDs you buy directly to Murfie

Our goal is to help you grow your music collection. If an album is out of stock, click the “Find it for me!” button and we’ll try to locate a copy for you.

If an album isn’t showing in your search results at all, email us at info@murfie.com and we’ll try to find you a copy.

If you can’t acquire an album those ways, we still have you covered! You can buy CDs elsewhere online and ship them directly to your Murfie collection.

When you buy a CD through another retailer, simply put Murfie’s warehouse address, your name, and your User ID in the shipping address. You can find that info in the proper format on your Profile Page (Look under “Direct Shipments To Your Murfie Collection”).

This service is meant for the occasional shipments of CDs you can’t find in our member shops. If you are shipping CDs you acquire in bulk (more than 3 CDs at once, or more than 10 per month), we add them to your collection at our standard kit rate.

After we receive your CDs, we’ll post the files online and email you when they’re ready to stream and download!

This Week in Music History (February 12th-18th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

2/12- On this day in 1964, The Beatles arrived in New York City for two performances at Carnegie Hall. Tickets were in such high demand that show organizers hastily created last-minute seating around the stage.

2/13- On this day in 1960, Frank Sinatra launched his own record label, Reprise Records, in an attempt to gain more artistic freedom for his work. The label earned Sinatra the nickname “Chairman of the Board”, and would later sign acts including Jimi Hendrix and The Beach Boys.

2/14- On this (Valentine’s!) day in 1998, Celine Dion‘s “My Heart Will Go On” set a new record for the highest number of radio plays in the United States after it was played 116 million times in one week.

2/15- On this day in 1962, Ray Charles recorded “I Can’t Stop Loving You” at United Studios in Hollywood, California. The song would go on to top the charts in both the US and the UK and remain there for 14 weeks.

2/16- On this day in 1985, Bruce Springsteen went to No. 1 on the UK album chart with Born to Run, his first UK No. 1 album. The album was the best-selling album of 1985 in the United States and The Boss’s all-time best-selling album.

2/17- On this day in 2005, a 1965 Fender Stratocaster guitar that had belonged to Jimi Hendrix was sold for £100,000 at an auction in London. Other Hendrix memorabilia, including a poem and a signed copy of “Hey Joe”, were auctioned as well.

2/18- On this day in 1990, Queen frontman Freddie Mercury made his final public appearance onstage when he joined his band to accept the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. The ceremony was held at the Dominion Theatre in London.

Check out these albums and other music history gems in our CD marketplace! Stream and download your favorites!

This Week in Music History (January 15th-21st)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/15- On this day in 1961, The Supremes signed a recording contract with Motown Records. Originally known as The Primettes, the group became America’s most successful group with 12 No. 1 singles on the Billboard Hot 100.

1/16- On this day in 1996, Jamaican authorities opened fire on Jimmy Buffett’s seaplane, which they mistakenly believed belonged to a drug trafficker. Neither Buffett nor U2 frontman Bono, who was also on the plan, was injured.

1/17- On this day in 1964, The Rolling Stones released their first EP. It included “You Better Move On”, “Bye Bye Johnny”, “Poison Ivy”, and “Money”, and peaked at No. 15 on the UK chart.

1/18- On this day in 1965, The Beatles made their debut on the US charts when their single “I Want to Hold Your Hand” entered the chart at No. 45. It would go on to spend seven weeks on the chart’s top spot.

1/19- On this day in 1980, Pink Floyd’s The Wall began a 15-week run at No. 1 on the US album chart. The album, which went on to sell over 23 million copies in the US alone, is the third largest grossing album of all time in the US.

1/20- On this day in 1982, during an Ozzy Osbourne concert in Des Moines, Iowa, an audience member threw a bat onto the stage. Thinking the bat was fake, Osbourne picked it up and attempted to bite its head off. Only then did Ozzy realize that the bat was living, and he was rushed to the nearest hospital for rabies shots.

1/21- On this day in 1968, Jimi Hendrix recorded his version of Bob Dylan’s famous song “All Along the Watchtower” at Olympic Studios in London, UK. The track was released as a single in the US, peaking at No. 20.

It’s easy to own your own pieces of music history—just head to our CD marketplace! Every purchase comes with unlimited streaming and downloads…now that’s pretty rockin’ ;)

This Week in Music History (January 8th-14th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/8- On this day in 196, The Rolling Stones‘ Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were barred from the Hotel Crillen in Lima, Peru. The rockers were asked to leave the exclusive hotel after hotel staff spotted them wearing op art pants and noting else. When they refused to change, the two were kicked out.

1/9- On this day in 1976, Queen shot to the top of the UK singles chart with “Bohemian Rhapsody”. The single, which enjoyed a nine-week run on the British chart and sold more than a million copies in a month, would go on to become the UK’s third best selling single of all time.

1/10- On this day in 1964, the first US Beatles album, Introducing…the Beatleswas released on Vee-Jay records.The album, featuring a photo of the Fab Four with their famous “mop top” haircuts, sold over 1.3 million copies that year.

1/11- On this day in 1964, Johnny Cash’s Ring of Fire became the first country album to hit No. 1 on the US album chart. Although Cash released dozens of albums during his career, the album remains among his most famous of all time.

1/12– On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin‘s self-titled debut album was released in the United Kingdom. The album, which was recorded in London, took only about 36 hours of studio time to complete. It spent a total of 71 weeks on the UK chart.

1/13- On this day in 1969, Elvis Presley began the first day of a 10-day recording session that would result in his final US No. 1 record, Suspicious Minds. The session took place at American Sound Studios in Memphis, Tennessee–the first time Presley had recorded in his hometown since 1956.

1/14- On this day in 1967, over 25,000 people attended the Human Be-In event at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. The concert was a forerunner of many of today’s major outdoor concerts, and featured artists like The Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane.

You can own any of these or other music history gems—just head to our music marketplace and pick them out! All albums purchases include: CD, streaming, and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless.