Album Preview: “They Want My Soul” by Spoon

They Want My SoulAlbum
They Want My Soul

Artist
Spoon

Release Date
August 5, 2014

Label
Loma Vista/Republic

Pre-order Link
Pre-order Album

Preview
Indie-rockers Spoon are set to release their newest album They Want My Soul next week. It has been four years since the band’s last major release, and although the album is being released on a new label, it is shaping up to deliver classic Spoon brilliance.Love Ways

Ga Ga Ga Ga GaSpoon has persisted throughout an erratic career in the music industry. The band released a string of EPs in the 1990s that were met with various modicums of positivity. Their first release on a major label in 1998 was a hard commercial failure, and the band was quickly dropped. After signing with an indie label a few years later, Spoon erupted in popularity. The 2000 release Love Ways began a renaissance era for the band. Kill the Moonlight was released in 2002, followed by Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga in 2007. Songs from each album were featured in several TV shows and movies throughout the decade. In 2009, the popular review aggregator Metacritic ranked Spoon as the top overall artist of the decade.

They Want My SoulKill the Moonlight is the first Spoon release on Loma Vista Recordings, and features a new guitarist/keyboardist. Thankfully, the changes in production and direction seem to suit the band’s classic sound. You can listen for yourself below and enjoy the official music video for the track “Do You,” which is featured on the new album. If the rest of the album is anything like “Do You,” longtime fans of the band should expect quite an appealing experience.

Preorder your copy of They Want My Soul at Murfie today! Each CD comes with unlimited streaming (Web, iOS, Android, Sonos) and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and ALAC.

Radiohead: A Career Defying Expectations


Pablo Honey
Radiohead, an English rock band from Oxfordshire, has made a career out of defying expectations. Over eight studio albums, the band—which consists of Thom Yorke, Johnny and Colin Greenwood, Phil Selway and Ed O’Brien—has constantly re-invented their sound, and managed to rack up 18 Grammy nominations and over 30 million in record sales along the way.

The five men met as boys in 1985, and quickly formed a band called “On A Friday.” Yet they didn’t hit their first break until 1991, when they happened upon a representative from EMI. After requesting that the five-piece change their name, the band signed a six-record deal as the newly named “Radiohead.”

RadioheThe Bendsad released their first record, Pablo Honey, in 1993. Largely influenced by the recent grunge and alternative rock movements, Pablo Honey sold relatively well and spawned the hit “Creep”; it also spawned the band’s first nickname, “Nirvana Lite.” Yorke and company quickly grew tired of being lazily lumped in with their peers, so for their next record, The Bends, they worked with producer Nigel Godrich in an attempt to shift their focus. What resulted was critical success and a cemented status as one of the top Brit-rock bands around.

OK ComputerYet again, Radiohead quickly grew tired of being set side by side with the other Britpop bands of the ‘90s. They responded in 1997 with the illustrious OK Computer, an album chock full of guitars and Thom Yorke’s now-legendary falsetto. Lyrically, OK Computer harks on the pitfalls of consumerism and the isolation experienced in the modern age; instrumentally, it’s all over the map: there are ballads (“Karma Police”), rockers (“Electioneering”), and songs that hit every mark in between (“Paranoid Android”). OK Computer was both a critical and commercial blockbuster, instantly landing the number one spot on the U.K. charts and eventually winding up at the 162nd spot on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

ExpectationKid As to deliver a hit record vastly increased after OK Computer, and again, Radiohead responded by shifting into new sonic territory. In 2000, they unleashed Kid A onto the world. Or should I say, the Internet did; Kid A was one of the first albums to ever leak on file sharing programs, and, with its heavy reliance on electronic samples and digital effects, it was an eerie fit. Even though Radiohead’s trademark guitar-driven sound is nearly absent on Kid A, it’s arguably their best. Heck, forget Radiohead: Kid A—which went on to win a Grammy for Best Alternative Music Album and was subsequently ranked the number one album of the 2000s by both Rolling Stone and Pitchfork Media—is arguably one of the greatest albums of all time.

AmnesiacRumor had it that the Kid A sessions had fostered enough music to span two discs, and, lo and behold, Radiohead released Amnesiac the following year. Amnesiac explores the same digital world as Kid A, (they both feature “Morning Bell”) but their respective perspectives are quite distinct. Amnesiac marked the fifth time the band had worked with Nigel Godrich, and it was nominated for the Mercury Prize in 2001.

Hail to the Thief Radiohead returned to their rock roots in 2003 with the release of Hail to the Thief, their most overtly political statement to date. Hail to the Thief is also the band’s most musically sporadic work, due to the way it was quickly recorded and loosely assembled. It was their fifth straight album to be nominated for the Grammy for Best Alternative Music Album.

In RainbowsAfter Hail to the Thief, Radiohead was no longer under contract with EMI. So for their next album, In Rainbows, the band opted out of signing any new contracts. Instead, they released it themselves in a pay-what-you-want format that many independent bands have adopted for use today. At the time, I thought they broke music. Now, I see that the marketing strategy was tremendously successful, though it doesn’t hurt that In Rainbows is a blend of nearly every version of Radiohead imaginable. In Rainbows is also arguably the band’s most accessible album besides OK Computer, which was, perhaps coincidentally, released exactly ten years earlier.

In 2011The King of Limbs, Radiohead released their most recent album, King of Limbs. Again working with Nigel Godrich, King of Limbs found the band focusing less on typical song structures and more on looping techniques. On one hand, the album is clearly distinct from the rest of their catalogue; on the other, its differences are what makes it wholly a Radiohead record.

As of 2014, Radiohead is on a well-deserved break. In the mean time, us fans are anxiously awaiting their next pitch. I hope it’s another curveball.


Andrew Brandt
@andrewtbrandt

Andrew is a communications intern at Murfie. When he’s not blogging here, you can probably find him blogging at a handful of other music sites. And when he’s not blogging at all, you can probably find him curled up with a good beer and a great book.



Interview with Zoë Keating [Podcast]

Photo credit: Chase Jarvis

Zoë Keating is a world-famous cellist and engaging storyteller. With a background in computer engineering, Zoë creates rich, layered cello compositions by looping audio tracks with a foot-petal-controlled laptop. In this great interview, Zoë discusses a lot of what makes her unique. Take a listen!

Who: Zoë Keating, interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
What: Producing independent music, playing with cheese graters, being tall.
Where: The Majestic Theatre, Madison, WI
When: Thursday, January 9th, 2014
How: Recorded by Kayla Liederbach
File: mp3 version

Find music by Zoë Keating in our shop.

Learn more about Zoë at zoekeating.com.

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