“Are you paying more for digital songs and albums than you need to?” Murfie says yes.

According to a recent comparison made by Mark Harris, buyers of digital music online save a significant amount of money when they purchase music from an alternate source than iTunes—like Amazon, for example.

How significant are those savings? We have some data that blows both iTunes and Amazon out of the water. When comparing the prices of 50 popular albums from a variety of genres on iTunes, Amazon, and murfie.com, and breaking it down by individual track price as well, Murfie has the lowest prices across the board.

For the following chart, we pulled the lowest album price from each of the three services, whether it was new or used: [View Price Comparison Chart Here]

You’d save $305.53 if you bought these 50 albums on Murfie over iTunes, and $159.87 and $246.48 if you chose Murfie over Amazon for physical albums and mp3 downloads, respectively. That’s 172% more you’re spending on 50 iTunes albums than Murfie albums, 90% more on Amazon CDs, and 138% more on Amazon mp3 albums.

An important thing to note is that when you buy an album on Murfie, you’re buying a real, physical CD stored at Murfie headquarters. From there, the innovative Murfie platform allows you to instantly access the music on your CD anyway you’d like: as downloads in your choice of formats (mp3, aac, FLAC, ALAC), via unlimited streaming (320kbps mp3 via website, iOS app, Android app, Sonos, VOCO), via delivery of the physical disc, or a combination of all of these.

As noted on the chart, some artists don’t even have downloads for sale on iTunes or Amazon. Since every album purchase on Murfie is backed by a real CD, you can download and stream music by these artists.

So what can you do with such significant savings? Buy more great music!

At the average cost of $3.56 per album on Murfie, you could get 85 more albums if you chose Murfie over iTunes, 44 more albums if you chose Murfie over Amazon CDs, and 69 more albums if you chose Murfie over Amazon mp3s.

If you don’t think Murfie’s prices can get any lower, think again. With a Murfie Gold or Murfie HiFi membership, you can save an extra $1 per album in the Murfie marketplace.

Albums come and go quickly at Murfie, and these prices were noted on 11/5/13. Visit murfie.com to buy CDs online and get unlimited streaming and downloads of your collection.

Our Podcast is on iTunes!

Pow! Bam! Boom! Our podcast series, which—as you (hopefully) know—brings you informal, fun interviews with a broad mix of emerging and established musicians, has been added to iTunes.

If you haven’t already, iTunes makes it easy peasy to subscribe to our podcast feed. Just hit the “Subscribe Free” button on our podcast page and automatically download future episodes.

A favor from the Murfie Podcast Team: click on over to our iTunes podcast page. Then, pretty please, give us a good rating or write a quick review. There’s already some lovely feedback up there :)

If you’re green to podcasts, here’s some tips on how podcasts work on iTunes.

Open Letter to Bruce Willis

 

Dear Bruce,

We weren’t surprised to learn that the recent stories about taking on Apple over rights to your iTunes collection turned out to be false. However, we suspect that this issue may be of genuine concern to you and to others who have amassed large collections of digital music downloads. For that, we feel your pain – and would like to lend a hand.

As a way to clear up the music ownership question and hopefully make up for some of the trouble caused by the free-wheeling London media, we have a simple offer for you: let us replace your entire iTunes collection, on us, with music you’ll really own on Murfie. We’ve even already opened up a Murfie account for you with some albums we suspect are part of your library.

I’m sure you have an absolutely incredible music collection. And, if you’re like most of us, it’s split between all of your CDs and the stuff you’ve downloaded from iTunes. The ownership rights that come with your CDs are clear. You can give them to a friend, trade them, sell them, donate them, and easily leave them to your heirs–all things that can be done with the music you own on Murfie.

However, as the recent press coverage has pointed out, your rights to the music you’ve downloaded are quite a bit more complicated. You’re likely limited in terms of how or where you can listen to your music. You certainly can’t sell or trade your downloads, and only time will tell if it will ever become possible to legally transfer rights to your downloads to your estate.

So, let us move your music collection to Murfie. To sweeten the deal, for every album in your collection that you move to Murfie, we’ll donate $10 to our charity of choice, the VH1 Save the Music Foundation. What do you say? You’ll get a complete collection of music you own and help out a great cause in the process. It doesn’t get better than that!

Sincerely,
Matt Younkle, Co-Founder
info@murfie.com

Music Ownership versus Music Rental

The Labor Day holiday this year almost turned into Litigation Day as rumors of Die Hard star Bruce Willis’s unhappiness with the licensing terms of his extensive iTunes library hit the intertubes. A British tabloid apparently started the story, which ultimately turned out to be unfounded. But the substantial dust that the story kicked-up has been exceedingly interesting to watch.

Fundamentally, music services like iTunes and Amazon Cloud Player and Spotify are about renting access to certain music. You pay a fee and you get access. When you stop paying or, in this particular case, when you cease breathing, that access goes poof. This is a reasonable way to consume music so long as you understand that it’s just a rental – not ownership – and that rental extends only to you.

Murfie is different.

We operate on the equivalent of the music gold standard. Each album at Murfie – whether you’re listening to it, buying or selling it, trading it, or giving it to a friend – is backed by an actual, physical CD that is stored in our warehouse. Our customers own their CDs and Murfie takes care of their collections. I guess maybe it’s more of a “silver standard” ;-) .

Instead of having their 100, 1000, or more CDs gathering dust on a shelf, Murfie adds value to our members’ CD collections by digitizing the discs for anytime/anywhere access; by offering a marketplace where they can buy, sell, and trade their discs; and by getting all that plastic the heck out of their homes. If you want your CDs back, or you want to give them to your kids (regardless of your breathing status), we ship them to you, or transfer ownership at Murfie, as you prefer. They are yours after all!

Music not on iTunes

Who says NO to the Apple behemoth?

Without question, the iTunes Store is the world’s #1 music store. It’s no contest. As a matter of fact, iTunes sold its 10 billionth song last year. Said Eddy Cue, Apple’s VP of Internet Software & Services, “We’re proud that iTunes has become the #1 music retailer in the world, and selling 10 billion songs is truly staggering.” Yessir, no matter how you slice it, 10,000,000,000 songs sold is pretty dang impressive. But there’s a BUT – some artists (granted, it’s the minority) still refuse to make their music available on iTunes.

Music acts, like AC/DC and Kid Rock, continue to shun the almighty iTunes for reasons that range from artistic integrity to profitability. Some say they don’t want their albums to be sliced and diced and sold as singles. Others say album sales are more profitable and they earn more from selling whole albums than they would from selling individual tracks (duh! – digital single-track sales are low-profit transactions). Still others say all the songs off an album belong together and are meant to be consumed as one and in the entirety.

Said AC/DC’s Angus Young, “If we were on iTunes, we know a certain percentage of people would only download two or three songs from the album – and we don’t think that represents us musically.”

See below for a list of artists who have yet to license their music (for the most part) to iTunes. Know of another? – leave a comment! Am I wrong on something? – let me know!

AC/DC
Garth Brooks
Kid Rock
Bob Seger
Def Leppard
Tool
The Smiths
Black Sabbath
King Crimson

If you’re bumming because you dig one or more of these artists, I have some ah-may-zing news for you. With Murfie, you actually can get your hands on digital downloads of their full albums. That’s because we sell physical CDs. After you purchase the CD, we will rip your disc at your request and bundle together the music files for you to download. OMG! Can life get any cooler? Yes, yes it can. Check out our store to browse all our albums, gloriously intact >>

Ripe for the ripping

Murfie will rip your CDs

A lot of people tell us: “Murfie looks great, but I haven’t gotten around to putting my CD collection on my iPod.”  Well, let’s take a look at your options…

Recently, PCWorld argued the case for ripping CDs without iTunes.  The rationale boiled down to four reasons, which I’ll enumerate in a sec, but do check out the article for complete coverage.
1) You may want to rip to audio file formats that iTunes doesn’t support, like FLAC.
2) You may want to rip your CDs in a byte-accurate or “secure” manner, something iTunes doesn’t support.
3) You may want to use a CD identification database other than Gracenote, which is what iTunes uses.
4) You may want to rip audiobooks.

Now, why should you let Murfie rip your music?  For starters, we use commercial-quality equipment to rip your CDs.  Secondly, the ripping software that we use is able to verify and separate errors, so bad tracks will always be either corrected (re-reads, disc polishing) or reported.  Thirdly, your album metadata is cross-checked among four databases, including the Rovi Music database which is considered the industry’s most in-depth database of descriptive data for music.  Fourthly, although Murfie doesn’t MAKE you give up your CDs and get them ripped at Murfie HQ by our practiced team, I bet you could think of a bunch of pastimes more worthy of your time than ripping your CD collection.

“How difficult is it to pop a CD, or even 100 CDs, into your computer and rip them?”  This was a comment to our article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, and it’s a completely reasonable question.  But if you haven’t gotten around to doing it yourself yet, do you really think it’s something you’ll get to anytime soon?  If, in your heart of hearts, you’re thinking “probably not, I’d rather enjoy listening to—not ripping—my music,” consider the value of our service.  Murfie charges only $1/disc, which covers all of the benefits highlighted above (count ‘em, there’s four!).   Every disc you send us also becomes part of your account on the Murfie ecosystem (aka our online music exchange/marketplace), so you’ll have the built-in option of selling or trading any discs you no longer want.  Or, if you just want us to professionally rip your entire CD collection for you, you have that option too.

So, to take advantage of our secure ripping service, and/or search for and purchase new music in exchange for idle CDs, you only have to ask yourself one question.  Do you have any CDs ripe for the ripping?