Interview with Amy Ray

One of my favorite Murfie podcasts is the Amy Ray podcast. Not only did I have a great chat with her in the basement of The Frequency, surrounded by walls that are covered in thousands of band stickers, paintings, and initials, but I stuck around for her show—and it was rockin’! We even got her song “Glow” on video!

Here’s a transcript of that podcast from May 2012. Read on!

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast. I’m pleased to say that I got to meet Amy Ray when she came to town. You probably know her as part of the Indigo Girls, the award-winning folk-rock duo from Georgia. Now, she has a solo career to go alongside that, and a rockin’ new album called Lung of Love. Here’s a clip from the chat that we had before her show at The Frequency.

[MUSIC: “Glow” by Amy Ray]

Kayla: So I’m talking to Amy Ray right now, at The Frequency in downtown Madison. Welcome to Madison, first of all.

Amy: Thanks, I always love bein’ in Madison—always, always.

Kayla: Awesome. So you’re here debuting your new CD—you’re on tour for that. And for the past ten years, about, you’ve been going solo; so what’s that like after two decades with the Indigo Girls?

Amy: Well actually, I still do both, so it’s like, I started going solo around 2000 and just interspersing it with Indigo Girls stuff. And so, I mean, at first, it was kind of crazy because we Indigos were playing kind of big places and then when I started doing solo, I started just doing small clubs like The Frequency—which I’m still doing. So, it was kind of at first like I adjusted, and just learned how to— We drive ourselves, you know, fix my own amp, fix my guitars, you know, whatever needs to be done. And so, for me it’s like kind of, extremely DIY [laughs], is what it is, and Indigo Girls are extremely the other way. So, it’s like this great sort of thing that I just go back and forth between, and it gives me perspective on both things.

Kayla: Awesome. So, is it different putting out music nowadays, compared to the earlier days when you got started?

Amy: Yeah, ‘cause when we started, it was still, like, ’85. I mean, we started in ’80, but we were putting out music starting in ’85, and we were just out of high school. And we were doing cassettes—like how you made your friend mix tapes, we would make our little cassettes of our songs, and we did like a little vinyl single, and a little vinyl EP, and LP. Yeah, and college radio was a really big deal then, so that’s what you wanted: you wanted to get on college radio—and you still do, but now it’s harder. And um, you just had like a network—like in each city, you sort of had this network: you had the record store, the indie art paper, the college radio station, and the venue, and you tried to get all those things to kind of stick together. And that’s still what you should do, but like the difference now is that we have so many great tools—Facebook and Twitter and all these things—and ways to record music, and ways to get music out there, and everything’s cheaper. It’s either like, a really great thing, or it can be a really bad thing, but I think personally I like to look at it as a really great thing, cause I think it’s like tools that we can use to sort of get music out there, and cross-pollinate more, and share with our friends, and have music take its place as more of a community thing.

Continue reading Interview with Amy Ray

This Week in Music History (July 10th-16th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

29012-large7/10- On this day in 1975, Cher filed for divorce from Gregg Allman of The Allman Brothers just 10 days after they were married. Cher’s divorce from Sonny Bono was finalized just three days before that.

39163-large7/11- On this day in 1992, Grateful Dead guitarist Jerry Garcia released a line of eight designer neckties that were inspired by his artwork.

78914-large7/12- On this day in 1962, The Rolling Stones played their first gig in London’s Marquee Jazz Club. Most members of Jagger’s usual blues band weren’t available, so Jagger convinced the club’s owner to let his new band play instead. When calling the local press to announce the gig, Jagger reportedly chose their band name on a whim while looking at track names on The Best of Muddy Waters LP – “Rollin’ Stone”.

6327-large7/13- On this day in 1985, an estimated 1.9 billion people watched the Live Aid concerts that were broadcast around the world. The goal was to raise funds that would go towards famine relief in Ethiopia, and many of the biggest names in music performed for free, including Elvis Costello, U2, Queen, The Beach Boys, the Pretenders, and Madonna.

332-large7/14- On this day in 1987, Steve Miller of the Steve Miller Band received his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Originally from Milwaukee, WI, Miller dropped out of UW-Madison only six credits shy of a literature degree, in order to move to Chicago to pursue a career in music (which obviously paid off).

28980-large7/15- On this day in 1946, singer/songwriter Linda Ronstadt was born. Among many accomplishments in her career, she’s released over 30 studio albums, and also starred in Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta Pirates of Penzance.

133036-large7/16- On this day in 1967, Joni Mitchell performed at the Newport Folk Festival and participated in an afternoon songwriter’s workshop with others like Leonard Cohen.

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