June albums: 20th anniversary

It’s hard to believe it’s 2015 and the majority of us have been buying CDs for over 20 years. This month marks the 20th anniversary of a few famous albums that were released in 1995. Remember these?

Take That Nobody ElseTake That
Nobody Else
June 8th, 1995

The third album by British boy band Take That, this was the last recording before original band members like Robbie Williams disbanded. It contains their most successful song “Back For Good”.

 

Bjork PostBjörk
Post

June 13th, 1995

This is the third album by Icelandic singer- songwriter Björk, in which she brought an electronic-pop sound with teasers of trip-hop and other styles. The album was met with critical success and was certified platinum in the US, UK, Canada, Europe and Australia.

 

Alanis Morissette Jagged Little PillAlanis Morissette
Jagged Little Pill
June 13th, 1995

One of the most memorable albums of the 90s, Jagged Little Pill put Alanis on the map as an alternative rock goddess. The album was written after a breakup, with singles like “Ironic” and “You Oughta Know”.

 

Selena Dreaming of YouSelena
Dreaming of You
June 18th, 1995

This album made Selena the first Hispanic singer to have an album debut at No.1 on the US Billboard charts. The release was a historic event in terms of album sales from a female singer as well.

 

Michael Jackson HIStoryMichael Jackson
HIStory: Past, Present and Future
June 20th, 1995

This was the first album released on Michael Jackson’s own label, MJJ Productions. Disc 1 is a compilation of greatest hits, and Disc 2 was completely new material at the time.

Perpetual at Best: Songs That Get Stuck in My Head

Headache

Warning: This article contains content that may cause severe psychological annoyance. For better or for worse, these are songs that enter the deepest recesses of my subconscious and squat the land of my cerebral campground like an unwanted relative around the holidays. These are not necessarily “bad” songs. However, upon hearing them in one’s head for the ten thousandth time, the lines between “good” and “bad” become nonexistent. The songs become, instead, perpetual at best.

My mind is a psychotic radio dial. When I wake up in the morning, music immediately begins to swell in my head whether I Come Away With Mepress the play button or not. I do not have a radio alarm clock; it seems as if I was born with one already installed. Some days this is a blessing. Who wouldn’t want to wake up and start the day with Elvis Costello or Norah Jones crooning them through their morning routine? Or maybe a bit of Madama Butterfly for a dramatic edge to the day? I like these days.

Then there are other days, or sometimes even weeks, where I find myself waking up to an immediate crescendo of Michael Jackson’s “P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing)” from Thriller. I couldn’t explain it at first; I hadn’t heard this song in years. In an attempt to force it out of my head, I tried listening to it over and over again throughout my daily activities. ThrillerBrushing my teeth, I had it playing in the other room. Smearing butter over toast in the kitchen, it was blaring away. Leading a 1970’s disco troupe in a synchronized dance-off in my living room, you bet it was playing. Sometimes you have to sacrifice your sanity to put a spring in your step.

How did I eventually cure myself of this Michael Jackson madness? A chance encounter with Mott the Mott the HoopleHoople’s 1972 smash hit, “All the Young Dudes.” I didn’t stand a chance against this song: from the mighty and infectious guitar solo in the opening bars, to the glam-rock bell tones of the chromatically descending chorus, the song loops in my head like rock and roll funeral march. The song was written by David Bowie specifically for the band upon hearing that they were on the verge of breaking up. (Fun fact: the song that Bowie had originally offered the band was “Suffragette City,” which would later become a hit on The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Mott the Hoople turned it down.)

Permission to Land

Speaking of glam-rock, we come to the greatest ear-worm of them all: “I Believe in a Thing Called Love,” by The Darkness. This 2003 release is almost a caricature of itself; ear-piercing falsetto vocals and over-the-top guitar and synth transport the listener to the heyday of the 1970s. The chorus is catchy to the point of being almost unforgettable. In my own case, I literally cannot forget it. And I think I’m okay with that.

Want something stuck in your head? Murfie makes it easy. Buy CDs in our marketplace starting at $2 ,and you’ll see what I mean. 



Grant Peterre
@gpeterre

Grant is a Communications Intern at Murfie. He has played the guitar nearly his entire life, and his music and writings have been featured in international publications. He makes his home in both the United States and Italy, and will always be traveling in search of something.


This Week in Music History (March 5th-11th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

3/5- On this day in 1983, Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” started a seven-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart. The song was his fourth solo No.1 in the United States, and also went to No.1 in the United Kingdom.

3/6- On this day in 1965, The Temptations became the first male group to have a No.1 hit for Motown with their single “My Girl”, written by Smokey Robinson.

3/7- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin appeared at the Bluesville 69 Club at the Hornsey Wood Tavern, Finsbury Park, in London. The venue was a tiny room in back of the pub, with a stage that was so small that only the drum set fit onstage. The rest of the group was forced to stand on the floor with the crowd.

3/8- On this day in 2008, China began to impose tighter regulations on foreign pop stars after singer Björk caused a controversy by screaming “Tibet, Tibet” after performing her song “Declare Independence” at her concert in Shanghai.

3/9- On this day in 1991, British punk band The Clash scored their only UK No.1 single with “Should I Stay or Should I Go”. The song shot to popularity after it was used in a Levi’s TV advertisement.

3/10- On this day in 1964, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel recorded “The Sounds of Silence” as an acoustic duet. The song did not become a hit until late 1965, when record company producers added electric guitar, drums and bass to the track.

3/11– On this day in 2008, Madonna was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at a ceremony in New York City. The singer thanked her detractors in her acceptance speech, particularly those who “said I couldn’t sing, that I was a one-hit wonder”.

Pick up these pieces of music history in our CD marketplace! Every album you own comes with unlimited streaming and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC and Apple Lossless! :-)

This Week in Music History (February 5th-11th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

2/5- On this day in 1971, Black Sabbath began recording their third album, Master of Reality, in London. The album’s dark sound would prove incredibly influential on future grunge acts, including Nirvana and Soundgarden.

2/6- On this day in 1943, Frank Sinatra made his debut as a vocalist when he joined the radio show “Your Hit Parade”. He was eventually fired after messing up the song “Don’t Fence Me In” on the air.

2/7- On this day in 1979, The Clash kicked off their first North American tour at the Berkeley Community Theatre outside of San Francisco to promote their album London Calling.

2/8- On this day in 2006, Kelly Clarkson won two Grammy Awards–one for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance (“Since U Been Gone”) and one for Best Pop Vocal Album (Breakaway). She was the first “American Idol” contestant to win a Grammy.

2/9- On this day in 1964, The Beatles performed the first of three record-breaking appearances on “The Ed Sullivan Show”. 73 million people watched the show, which was the Fab Four’s American TV debut and beginning of their massive success stateside.

2/10- On this day in 1993, Michael Jackson was interviewed by Oprah Winfrey, his first interview in 15 years. In the interview, Jackson claimed that the reason for his drastic change in appearance was a disorder that destroys the pigmentation of the skin.

2/11- On this day in 1965, Beatles drummer Ringo Starr married his longtime girlfriend at Caxton Hall Registrar’s Office in London. Two of his bandmates were in attendance.

Check out these music history gems in our CD marketplace! Every purchase comes with unlimited streaming, and downloads in mp3, aac, FLAC, and Apple Lossless!

This Week in Music History (December 19th-25th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

12/19- On this day in 1957, Elvis Presley was served his draft notice for the United States Army. Presley would go on to join the 32nd Tank Battalion Third Armor Corps, based in Germany.

12/20- On this day in 1967, folk singer Joan Baez was sentenced to 45 days in prison. The singer had been arrested during an anti-war demonstration protesting the Vietnam War.

12/21- On this day in 1985, Bruce Springsteen’s famous Born in the USA passed Michael Jackson’s Thriller, becoming the second longest-lasting LP on the US Billboard Top 10. The Boss’s LP stayed atop the charts for 79 weeks.

12/22- On this day in 1981, at a rock and roll memorabilia auction in London, Beatles memorabilia was auctioned off to fans. A suit John Lennon wore onstage sold for £2,300, a letter from Paul McCartney sold for £2,200 and a sculpture of John and Yoko Ono sold for £4200.

12/23- On this day in 1977, English singer and songwriter Cat Stevens formally changed his name to Yusef Islam. Islam will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014.

12/24- On this day in 1965, The Beatles had the number one album in the US for the third Christmas season in a row. The Fab Four’s Rubber Soul topped the LP charts in 1965, after Beatles for Sale and With the Beatles the two previous years.

12/25- On this day in 1954, Bing Crosby’s White Christmas” was on the Billboard Pop Chart for the eleventh time. The song has sold over 100 million copies around the world.

Pick yourself up some pieces of music history in our CD marketplace, for as little as $1! Every album in your collection comes with free downloads (FLAC, ALAC, mp3, aac) and unlimited streaming. ;-)

Interview with Paper Bird

Mark Anderson was a really great person to chat with earlier this year on the Murfie Podcast. He plays percussion in Paper Bird, a harmonious seven-piece band that’s gaining more and more national buzz each day. Here’s a transcript of our interview, and another chance to dig in to the interesting world of up-and-coming music.

INTRO: This is Kayla here, with your Murfie podcast, right from murfie.com: the world’s largest used and new CD store online. So, one band that I’m really diggin’ right now is Paper Bird. They’re a seven-piece indie folk band from Colorado. I had a chat with one of the band members, Mark, right after they released their new album, Rooms.

[MUSIC: “As I Am” by Paper Bird]

Kayla: Alright, so right now I have Mark on the phone, from Paper Bird. Where are you calling from?

Mark: I’m just calling from my apartment in Denver, Colorado.

Kayla: Ok, yes, I saw that you guys are from Colorado, and I’ve never been there, but I’ve heard a lot of great things about that place. So, are a lot of people in the band from Colorado, originally, or did you guys end up there?

Mark: Um, most of us are from here, originally. Some of us were born other places—like Sarah, my sister, and I, were born in Ohio, but moved here when we were really young—and then a couple of members were born in Texas. But all of us say we’re from Colorado—it’s where we grew up.

Kayla: Right—it’s your home, totally! You and Sarah are brother and sister—I did not know that.

Mark: Yeah, yeah. There’s another set of siblings in the band, too: Genny and Esme are sisters.

Kayla: Oh, awesome! That’s fun.

Mark: Yeah.

Kayla: How did you all meet each other?

Mark: Well, we’ve known each other for a long time—it kind of was a culmination of coincidence and then also just like, common interest. Like, we all moved to Denver—um, god, I don’t know, we’ve lived in Denver for a long time. And I think just like, through random acquaintances, and some people through school and things like that, a loose group of us started getting together—and then music is what pulled us in farther, and slowly our friendships culminated into the band, and we’ve been doing it for like, six years now.

Kayla: That’s the best way to get started, you know—the music brings you together, the common interests. And you guys have developed a really unique sound, because basically everybody in the band contributes to writing songs and that sort of thing; so is that how it usually works? Do you guys kind of come to each other and say, “I have an idea for a song,” and then do you work on it together?

Continue reading Interview with Paper Bird

This Week in Music History (December 4th-10th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

12/4- On this day in 1964, The Beatles released their fourth studio album, Beatles for Sale. The album, which featured tracks like “Eight Days a Week” and “Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby”, spent 11 weeks at the top of the UK charts.

12/5- On this day in 1968, the Rolling Stones hosted a party in London to celebrate the release of their new album Beggar’s Banquet. Although Keith Richards was sick and unable to attend, the rest of the band and their guests participated in a custard pie food fight that became the highlight of the event.

12/6- On this day in 1969, Led Zeppelin made their debut on the US singles chart. The single, “Whole Lotta Love”, went on to become the first of six Top 40 singles for the band in the United States.

12/7- On this day in 1967, Otis Redding went in to the studio to record “(Sittin’ On) the Dock of the Bay”. The track went on to be his all-time biggest hit. Redding, however, would never see the single’s success; he died in a plane crash just days later on December 10, 1967.

12/8- On this day in 1961, The Beach Boys’ first single, “Surfin’”, was released on Candix Records, a small record label based in Los Angeles. The song became extremely popular in Southern California, and the band was soon signed to Capitol Records.

12/9-  On this day in 1967, The Doors played at the New Haven Arena in New Haven, Connecticut. Before the show began, police caught frontman Jim Morrison kissing a girl in a backstage shower. Morrison mocked the incident onstage, and was dragged off and arrested by police.

12/10- On this day in 1983, Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson began a six-week run at No. 1 on the US singles chart with “Say Say Say”. The song was Jackson’s 10th No. 1 hit and McCartney’s 29th.

Check out our marketplace, where you can buy albums that made music history! Unlimited downloads (mp3, aac, FLAC, Apple Lossless) and streaming included with every purchase.