Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

DJ Pain 1DJ Pain 1 is a prominent hip-hop producer, and over the years he’s worked with names you know like Young Jeezy, Public Enemy and Ludacris. He’s also a Madison local and active community member who volunteers for non-profits. We had the great pleasure of having him here at the Murfie office recently.

In this interview, he brings up some important topics—like the pressure that Madison police put on venues that try to book hip-hop shows. Unfortunately, the lack of hip-hop in Madison makes it hard for talented acts to really blossom in town. What you might not know about DJ Pain 1 is that his real name is Pacal Bayley. He’s a true lover of all dedicated musicians, a physical music collector, and a mushroom hunter—although he’ll never tell you where he finds morels.

Now, I don’t want to give away all the best parts. Here’s a transcript of our interview along with the recorded version (below) on our Soundcloud player.

Note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Who: DJ Pain 1; interviewed by Kayla Liederbach
Where: Murfie HQ, Madison, WI
When: Wednesday July 1st, 2015

K: So I am currently in one of the Murfie warehouse rooms surrounded by discs with DJ Pain 1. Welcome to the office, first of all.

DJ: This is kind of surreal.

K: It is. Being surrounded by so much music kind of makes you think about all the albums that have come out over the years.

DJ: Well all I see is boxes, so I’m just smelling cardboard—and there are all these boxes with numbers written on all of them. It’s like musical coffins or something.

K: That’s one way to think about it, for the people who store their CDs here. We do have people who get their CDs digitized and shipped back to them. But I suppose it is a good resting place, and these boxes are actually like water resistant and temperature—

DJ: Oh they are?

K: Yeah we make sure everything stays nice and cozy in there. But you know there are a lot of things to talk about in music, especially someone like you who is involved on all these different levels. So over the years as you’ve gained all your experience, the music industry has changed a lot, especially recently, in terms of the way people listen to music, and the way it’s being released. So in your opinion, is the music industry changing for better or for worse?

DJ: I think it’s always a duality. I think access is a good thing, and access has been improving for decades now. And so what access begets is saturation. And of course it changes the landscape as far as fans are concerned and their expectations of artists. They expect a lot of music, and they expect instant access, and they expect free most of all. And so that’s not necessary a bad thing, because it’s forced artists to really adapt in new and innovative ways, whether it’s just challenging the traditions of a genre or finding new and exciting ways to market and promote themselves. So, it’s good for some and bad for others, I guess that’s a subjective question. And I don’t necessarily know, because I’m benefiting a lot from it—but then on a macro level the music industry is just kind of crumbling before my very eyes. At first that kind of scared me, but now I’m just sitting there looking at my watch waiting for it to happen, because I kind of can’t stand the paradigm. But it also every now and then lets me in through a door, and then I make some money and get some notoriety off it.

DJ Pain 1K: Well I like what you said about finding ways to adapt that are new and interesting. I feel like that’s gonna be the differentiator between people who succeed regardless of how the music industry ends up being. So what are some of the best ways that you’ve learned to connect with your audience and make a living?

DJ: I give a lot of stuff away for free. And maybe the ratio is somewhere around 10:1 or 15:1. 15 being what I give away and 1 being what I sell. It gives me more leverage for the people that are following me and benefiting from the resources I give out. So I don’t know if it works, but it’s worked for me in some capacity, so I’m going to keep doing it.

K: Well especially if your music is good and people like it.

DJ: Yeah with me I really speak more to the producer community, so: free resources for producers, a lot of video advice for just aspiring artists of all kinds, and streaming Q&A shows, panels, the professional development stuff that we do locally here. I’ve done it around the country too a little.

K: So you’ve seen Madison’s music scene, and you’ve also traveled to different places. How does Madison’s music scene compare to other places?

DJ: That goes back to the word access. I’m gonna use Appleton as an example just because it’s so close and it’s so much smaller than Madison. I mean, their population is a lot smaller than Madison’s. You know alone we have 40,000+ just students, just like a transient population, but Appleton has more venues, more music events going on concurrently, more music festivals, and just it seems that there’s more access. And I know that things have changed maybe in the last year or two, but when I go there it appears to me that they have more going on. When you come to Madison there are very few options as far as live music goes, and especially if you’re a fan of what people would consider—quote urban unquote—styles of music. That’s unfortunate. Because I mean the talent here isn’t any less amazing. And I’ve been all over the place and we have great talent here. But I think access and opportunity not only allows for sustainability, but it also promotes talent too, and growth too. I mean people feel boxed in here, so I don’t think we’re all growing as much as we could be.

K: You know, when you say that, I do realize I haven’t seen a lot of hip-hop and rap shows being promoted.

DJ: No they’re all banned, it’s banned. Name a venue and I’m probably banned from it.

K: Really! Majestic? Frequency?

Continue reading Interview with DJ Pain 1 [Podcast]

Musical Memories of Dad

Kayla: Father’s Day weekend is here, and many of us are taking time to say “thank you” to the guy who showed us so much about life. If your dad is anything like mine, he’s a huge music lover. I remember sitting on the couch with Dad, watching Pop Up Video on VH1 for hours, singing along to “Under the Bridge” by Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Don’t Speak” by No Doubt, and “Fantasy” by Mariah Carey.

RHCPMy dad tells a funny story about the first time I ever spoke a “complete sentence” in front of him. He said we were in our usual couch spot, watching Pop Up Video, when I turned to him and said, “Maybe the Wed Hot Chiwi Peppews will come on!”. (I’m from Wisconsin, but for some reason I spoke with a weird New-York-sounding accent when I was little.) My Dad said that he was so surprised and amazed to hear my first real phrase be about RHCP.

A lot of us have musical memories like these, whether your dad likes classic rock, funk, or classical composers. I asked the Murfie staff to share some musical memories they have of their dads, along with particular albums that come to mind. I hope you enjoy!

Beach BoysJohn: “Any album by The Beach Boys reminds me of my pops. I remember the ride home from daycare when I was little always seemed to include a Beach Boys tape. A lot of those songs are on Endless Summer.”

Blood, Sweat & TearsJeff:Blood, Sweat & Tears is one of my dad’s favorite bands and he plays them all the time. I don’t know if I’ve ever met anyone else who likes this band.”

Prime PrineAndrew: “This CD [Prime Prine] never left my Dad’s ’94 Plymouth Voyager. It was a staple on all of our family vacations.”

Jagged Little PillSteve: “My dad use to listen to Jagged Little Pill in the car when we lived in Oregon in ~96′. He would turn down the music when she drops F-bombs to protect my young and impressionable ears”

Kingston TrioMarc: “There was very little music in my house growing up. Radio was almost always talk stations with NPR classical in the car on Sunday mornings. However, I do remember many car rides back from Sunday church with The Kingston Trio in the tape deck, and, with the amazing technology of bi-directional tape decks, on infinite repeat.”

Car and DriverJason: “My parents almost always had music on in the car, and on Sundays they would play ‘oldies’ on 101.5 FM in Madison for a few hours in the morning (this was before the 24/7 Oldies stations). My dad was in a band in the 60’s and was into a wide-range of music from that era, but this album [Car & Driver] has a lot of his favorites.”

Richard ThompsonMatt W: “My father was very particular about the music we had playing in the car when we went to see relatives. Depending on the relative we were visiting it would either be Richard Thompson or Wagner.”

James: “It was Pop’s duty to clean the house every Saturday while Mom worked; he needed to look after us kids as well, but he never really considered that a chore. Two things would usually accompany his cleaning: records and a cocktail. The drink was usually either a 7&7 or a CC&7, and while the records would rotate through whatever Colombia House had sent that month, he would always find his way back to AbraxasAbraxas or Steppenwolf Live. Whenever I hear ‘Oye Como Va’ or ‘Magic Carpet Ride’ it brings me right back to those golden Saturdays – and I am reminded of MY first drink, as a 5 or 6 year old. I had just come in from playing outside, parched, and saw his cocktail on the kitchen table. I mistook it for an inexplicably unattended, but probably refreshing, lemon-lime soda; the condensation glistening in the soft Steppenwolf Liveafternoon light, taunting my thirst, begging me gulp some down. Now, Pop was watching from around the corner as all this was happening, and as witness he loved to tell this story. At that point in the tale he would pantomime my reaction (sometimes with an added spit take for the extra funny) and double over in uproarious laughter – he said he could never forget the look of disgust and shock on my face after I lowered the glass from my lips, but unfortunately he could never remember whether it was a 7&7 or a CC&7.”

LegendPete: “My Dad loved music, and Frank Sinatra was without doubt his favorite artist of all time. I remember as a kid sitting for hours with my older brother flicking through his vinyl record collection—he had a lot of Beatles 45 EP’s too. One album I remember him asking us to buy him for his birthday during the mid 80’s was Legend. Whenever I hear the song ‘One Love’ or see this album sleeve, it always reminds me of my Dad.”

Chet BakerLena: “My dad consistently listened to show High Standards with Jonathan Schwartz and the Real Jazz channel on Sirius. Just hearing the name Wynton Marsalis reminds me of him. I think my dad has a soft spot for Chet Baker, and so do I—it’s hard not to once you start listening.”

Smash MouthLeah: “My dad has always been a blast to drive around with, since he loves to play all sorts of music at full volume in his car. During my childhood, his picks centered on rockers like ZZ Top, Spin Doctors, and Nirvana, but as I aged, his tastes progressed to everything from Rage Against the Machine, to The Used (yes, really), to The Shins, to a fantastic Argentine accordian player named Chango Spasiuk. However, the fact that my dad will to this day still randomly chant that main distorted guitar riff from Smash Mouth‘s ‘Walkin’ on the Sun’ (‘ehh-EH-eh-EH-EH’) made this an easy choice amongst all of his favorites for jammin’ out.”

Happy Father’s Day from the Murfie crew! :-)

Shopkeep of the Week

2013_0403_featuredshop_may23Way, way back in the good old days of October 2011, Marcus decided to sign up for Murfie. Since then, he’s ordered two kits and sent about 450 discs from Massachusetts to Madison. He’s sold hundreds of them so far, and made some nice cash! Heres a little bit more about this CD-selling pro.

Murfie: How did you originally learn about Murfie?
Marcus: I heard about Murfie on NPR on the bus back to Boston from NYC and I signed up on my smartphone then and there.

Murfie: When did you purchase your first CD? What was it?
Marcus: I purchased my first CD in 1992 at Turtle Music in Atlanta, but I can’t remember what album it was.

Murfie: How many CDs do you own (or did you own at peak)?
Marcus: I owned over 500 CDs at one time.

Murfie: How tall are you?
Marcus: 5 feet 11 and a half inches, and that half is important.

Murfie: Tell us about your musical tastes.
Marcus: My musical tastes are pretty wide ranging, from Lightning Hopkins, Muddy Waters, and Miles Davis, to Neil Young, Radiohead, and The Decemberists, but it probably culminates in the Southern Blues/Rock sound. I never get tired of JJ Grey & Mofro, Whiskey Town, My Morning Jacket and Widespread Panic.

Murfie: What can folks expect to find in your store (if different than the above)?
Marcus: A little bit of everything.

Murfie: If you could meet any musician or band in person, who would it be and why?
Marcus: That is a tough one. I would probably go with Muddy Waters since he is no longer with us and there is still a chance I could meet Neil Young or the boys from Widespread Panic.

Murfie: What is your favorite album at the moment?
Marcus: Since it is spring, I really love listing to the first disc of Light Fuse, Get Away with the windows down while driving. Panic is extremely tight on this live album and the set list progression is just pure perfection.

Murfie: What do you plan to do with the millions of dollars you’re making from your Murfie shop?
Marcus: Create my own festival headlined by Panic and Neil Young so they can perform “Walk On”, “Are You Ready for the Country” and “Mr. Soul” together.

Murfie: Which Beatle was your favorite?
Marcus: I don’t have a favorite Beatle, I know it may be sacrilegious, but I’m not really a Beatles fan.

Check out Marcus’ shop on Murfie!

Shopkeep of the Week is a weekly feature that focuses on our most interesting Murfie shopkeepers. These are music lovers like you who have sold hundreds of pre-loved CDs on Murfie and have hundreds more at the ready to please your ears! If you’d like your Murfie Shop to be featured, or if you’d like to nominate a shop to be featured, please e-mail us at info@murfie.com and let us know.

Shopkeep of the Week

hbebbjaf

We know him as “One Dollar Albums“, but it’s time to meet the man behind the username: Jordan!

Back in 2011, Jordan signed up for Murfie, and since then he’s sent over 1200 discs from good ol’ Montana to Madison. He successfully markets his shop via facebook and twitter.

Murfie: How did you originally learn about Murfie?
Jordan: I heard the piece about Murfie on NPR’s “Weekend Edition”.

M: When did you purchase your first CD? What was it?
J: It was Another Level by Blackstreet. No diggity.

M: How many CDs do you own (or did you own at your peak)?
J: I’ve sold a few hundred, and I invested the funds in additional inventory for my store. The most I’ve had at once is about 850.

M: How tall are you?
J: 5’11”

M: Tell us about your musical tastes.
J: Post-punk/Manchester bands like The Smiths and Joy Division are my favorites, but I also love Riot Grrl bands of the 90’s, hip hop, and I have a lifelong obsession with David Bowie. I also love anything that’s fun. I love to flip on the radio and hear a jam by Rihanna or Ke$ha.

M: What can folks expect to find in your store (if different than the above)?
J: My goal with the store is to have good albums by artists you’ve heard of all priced at $1. It has a little bit of everything, from Ricky Martin to The Doors to Black Sabbath to Garth Brooks.

M: If you could meet any musician or band in person, who would it be and why?
J: I would meet Morrissey to see if he’s really like that in person. He can’t be, can he?

M: What is your favorite album at the moment?
J: So by Peter Gabriel.

M: What do you plan to do with the millions of dollars you’re making from your Murfie shop?
J: Ha! I’m not making millions, but I am coming out ahead. I got involved because I thought it was a neat project, and I liked the recycling element. I haven’t put a lot of thought into what I will do with the money. Maybe I will get a Sonos player.

M: Which Beatle was your favorite?
J: Billy Shears.

Check out Jordan’s shop on Murfie!
“One Dollar Albums” on Facebook: www.facebook.com/onedollaralbums
On Twitter: https://twitter.com/1dollaralbums

Shopkeep of the Week is a weekly feature that focuses on our most interesting Murfie shopkeepers. These are music lovers like you who have sold hundreds of pre-loved CDs on Murfie and have hundreds more at the ready to please your ears! If you’d like your Murfie Shop to be featured, or if you’d like to nominate a shop to be featured, please e-mail us at info@murfie.com and let us know.

Yep, Murfie got “Considered”

Listen to us on All Tech Considered

‘Tis true. We were featured on NPR on All Things Considered. More precisely, the series “All Tech Considered.” All Things Considered is pretty much the jackpot of NPR news programs, and in fact, it was the first news program on NPR. Suffice it to say that we are pretty amped about this press coverage. (By the way, did you know that you can check out all our media shout-outs on this page?)

I don’t have much else to say other than…listen to the NPR audio story here!