Musical Memories of Dad

Kayla: Father’s Day weekend is here, and many of us are taking time to say “thank you” to the guy who showed us so much about life. If your dad is anything like mine, he’s a huge music lover. I remember sitting on the couch with Dad, watching Pop Up Video on VH1 for hours, singing along to “Under the Bridge” by Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Don’t Speak” by No Doubt, and “Fantasy” by Mariah Carey.

RHCPMy dad tells a funny story about the first time I ever spoke a “complete sentence” in front of him. He said we were in our usual couch spot, watching Pop Up Video, when I turned to him and said, “Maybe the Wed Hot Chiwi Peppews will come on!”. (I’m from Wisconsin, but for some reason I spoke with a weird New-York-sounding accent when I was little.) My Dad said that he was so surprised and amazed to hear my first real phrase be about RHCP.

A lot of us have musical memories like these, whether your dad likes classic rock, funk, or classical composers. I asked the Murfie staff to share some musical memories they have of their dads, along with particular albums that come to mind. I hope you enjoy!

Beach BoysJohn: “Any album by The Beach Boys reminds me of my pops. I remember the ride home from daycare when I was little always seemed to include a Beach Boys tape. A lot of those songs are on Endless Summer.”

Blood, Sweat & TearsJeff:Blood, Sweat & Tears is one of my dad’s favorite bands and he plays them all the time. I don’t know if I’ve ever met anyone else who likes this band.”

Prime PrineAndrew: “This CD [Prime Prine] never left my Dad’s ’94 Plymouth Voyager. It was a staple on all of our family vacations.”

Jagged Little PillSteve: “My dad use to listen to Jagged Little Pill in the car when we lived in Oregon in ~96′. He would turn down the music when she drops F-bombs to protect my young and impressionable ears”

Kingston TrioMarc: “There was very little music in my house growing up. Radio was almost always talk stations with NPR classical in the car on Sunday mornings. However, I do remember many car rides back from Sunday church with The Kingston Trio in the tape deck, and, with the amazing technology of bi-directional tape decks, on infinite repeat.”

Car and DriverJason: “My parents almost always had music on in the car, and on Sundays they would play ‘oldies’ on 101.5 FM in Madison for a few hours in the morning (this was before the 24/7 Oldies stations). My dad was in a band in the 60’s and was into a wide-range of music from that era, but this album [Car & Driver] has a lot of his favorites.”

Richard ThompsonMatt W: “My father was very particular about the music we had playing in the car when we went to see relatives. Depending on the relative we were visiting it would either be Richard Thompson or Wagner.”

James: “It was Pop’s duty to clean the house every Saturday while Mom worked; he needed to look after us kids as well, but he never really considered that a chore. Two things would usually accompany his cleaning: records and a cocktail. The drink was usually either a 7&7 or a CC&7, and while the records would rotate through whatever Colombia House had sent that month, he would always find his way back to AbraxasAbraxas or Steppenwolf Live. Whenever I hear ‘Oye Como Va’ or ‘Magic Carpet Ride’ it brings me right back to those golden Saturdays – and I am reminded of MY first drink, as a 5 or 6 year old. I had just come in from playing outside, parched, and saw his cocktail on the kitchen table. I mistook it for an inexplicably unattended, but probably refreshing, lemon-lime soda; the condensation glistening in the soft Steppenwolf Liveafternoon light, taunting my thirst, begging me gulp some down. Now, Pop was watching from around the corner as all this was happening, and as witness he loved to tell this story. At that point in the tale he would pantomime my reaction (sometimes with an added spit take for the extra funny) and double over in uproarious laughter – he said he could never forget the look of disgust and shock on my face after I lowered the glass from my lips, but unfortunately he could never remember whether it was a 7&7 or a CC&7.”

LegendPete: “My Dad loved music, and Frank Sinatra was without doubt his favorite artist of all time. I remember as a kid sitting for hours with my older brother flicking through his vinyl record collection—he had a lot of Beatles 45 EP’s too. One album I remember him asking us to buy him for his birthday during the mid 80’s was Legend. Whenever I hear the song ‘One Love’ or see this album sleeve, it always reminds me of my Dad.”

Chet BakerLena: “My dad consistently listened to show High Standards with Jonathan Schwartz and the Real Jazz channel on Sirius. Just hearing the name Wynton Marsalis reminds me of him. I think my dad has a soft spot for Chet Baker, and so do I—it’s hard not to once you start listening.”

Smash MouthLeah: “My dad has always been a blast to drive around with, since he loves to play all sorts of music at full volume in his car. During my childhood, his picks centered on rockers like ZZ Top, Spin Doctors, and Nirvana, but as I aged, his tastes progressed to everything from Rage Against the Machine, to The Used (yes, really), to The Shins, to a fantastic Argentine accordian player named Chango Spasiuk. However, the fact that my dad will to this day still randomly chant that main distorted guitar riff from Smash Mouth‘s ‘Walkin’ on the Sun’ (‘ehh-EH-eh-EH-EH’) made this an easy choice amongst all of his favorites for jammin’ out.”

Happy Father’s Day from the Murfie crew! :-)

Last Call: Your Murfie Week in Review


 Monday 5/5 

shinsOn Twitter: @bradleege won a copy of Chutes too Narrow by The Shins in our first #FreeFriday giveaway!

On the Blog: Ally reviewed three of her favorite folk albums (Let’s Be Still by The Head and The Heart, Indigo Girls by Indigo Girls, and Diamonds and Rust by Joan Baez) in Staff Picks: Ally’s Folk Picks.

On Twitter: We responded to a Forbes article called “Taking The Collecting Out Of Music“, letting them know that the spirit of the music collector is alive and well at Murfie.

In the Press: AudioStream wrote an article about us called “Murfie: A New Home for Your CDs in the Cloud“.


 Tuesday 5/6 

377182-largeIn the marketplace: 5 brand new album releases by Atmosphere, Lily Allen, Natalie Merchant, Sarah McLachlan and The Horrors were added to the Murfie marketplace.

On Twitter: We congratulated Musaic for the success of their Kickstarter campaign and expressed our excitement for being a streaming partner!


 Wednesday 5/7 

– On the Blog: Ally gave us our weekly dose of music history in This Week in Music HIstory (May 7th-13th).



 Thursday 5/8 

tbt– On Twitter: Throwback Thursday! Out #tbt tweet included an article and a picture of Matt and Preston from 2011, back when Murfie had “a couple hundred” members.

– In the Press: AV Specialists posted our guest article, called How Does Murfie Work? A Murfie Employee Explains. The post includes a special offer!


 Friday 5/9 

mouse– On the Blog: Andrew posted our #FreeFriday giveaway: The Mouse and the Mask by DANGERDOOM. You still have a chance to win if you retweet us or share our Facebook post!

– On Twitter: We got a shout-out all the way from Australia! The locals love us! :-)


Saturday 5/10

– On the Blog: Ally told us about some Mom-Approved Modern Music for Mother’s Day.


 

#FreeFriday: The Mouse and the Mask

Time for our second edition of #FreeFriday! Each week we’ll review an album, and give it away to one lucky winner. For a chance to win the album, all you have to do is read this post, then share on social media at least one of these ways:

  • Share this blog post on Twitter—use the hashtag #FreeFriday and tag @murfiemusic
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share our #FreeFriday Facebook post (in a public post)

Now, on to this week’s awesome featured album…
mouse

The Mouse and the Mask (DANGERDOOM, 2005)

DANGERDOOM’s 2005 album The Mouse and the Mask begins with a very interesting question. The first voice on the album isn’t either of the group’s two members but rather the voice of Brak (the catlike alien you may remember from Space Ghost) asking the listener “Why did you buy this album? …I don’t know why you did, you’re stupid.” Aside from bringing up deep questions about the appeal of physical music in a digital age (which we at Murfie know all too well) this opening perfectly sets the tone for the rest of the album. The Cartoon Network samples may make it difficult to take the album seriously, but the combined talents of Daniel Dumile and Brian Burton make it an album that, despite Brak’s protests, is definitely worth buying (or winning from #FreeFriday).

Dumile and Burton, better known by their stage names MF DOOM and Danger Mouse, are two of the most innovative and prolific hip hop artists of the last decade, and both were at the top of their game on this album. At the time of The Mouse and the Mask’s release, Dumile had released a plethora of material both lyrical and instrumental under several different names including Viktor Vaughn, King Geedorah, and Madvillain. Burton’s history isn’t anything to sneeze at either. By 2005 Danger Mouse had already gained national attention from his mixtape The Grey Album, a mashup of Jay-Z’s The Black Album with The Beatleseponymous white album. He went on to start Gnarls Barkley with Cee-Lo Green and Broken Bells with The Shins’ James Mercer. Burton was also credited with production on GorillazDemon Days, The Black KeysAttack & Release, and Beck’s Modern Guilt. It really is quite the resumé.

DOOM’s intricate rhyme schemes, Danger Mouse’s sampling skills, and the duo’s extensive experience make this album a great listen, but they’re not the only big names on the record. Burton’s pal Cee-Lo croons the silky smooth hook on “Benzie Box” while Doom spits alongside fellow New Yorkers Talib Kweli (on “Old School”) and Wu Tang’s Ghostface Killah (on “The Mask”). The album also features dialog from various characters from Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim, including the casts of Space Ghost Coast to Coast, Aqua Teen Hunger Force, and Sealab 2021.

The Mouse and the Mask follows a storyline in which Aqua Teen’s Master Shake keeps trying to convince Danger Mouse to help him produce a new rap album, but the goofy dialogue is just a frilly garnish atop a rich and complex musical feast. No matter where Danger Mouse goes with his samples, DOOM is right behind him with a mind-blowing string of carefully veiled puns and tongue-twisting alliteration. I’d love to tell you more about it, but in a single line Dumile gives a summary better than I could ever hope to provide with a thousand words. At the end of “Mince Meat,” he boasts: “Off a DAT tape of rap, country or deep house / I’ll make mincemeat out of that beat, Mouse.”

Share this post in one of the ways listed above, and we’ll let you know if you’re the winner on Monday! Good luck!



Andrew Hinkens

Andrew works in Operations at Murfie, taking great care to make sure all your albums are ripped quickly and accurately. He enjoys collecting vinyl, going to concerts, longboarding, and playing with just about any dog he can get close to.



#FreeFriday

Nothing sounds quite as good as a giveaway.

On Murfie, we’ve got tons of albums in the marketplace (literally—tons!), just hangin’ out, waiting to be bought and listened to. We thought we’d give these lil’ fellas a quicker chance to be enjoyed—as they’re supposed to be—by giving them away to one lucky winner each week!

Introducing…#FreeFriday!

On #FreeFriday, one of our Murfie staffers will give you the rundown about a cool album in our marketplace. For a chance to win the album, all you gotta do is read the post, then share on social media at least one of these ways (the more you share, the better your chance):

  • Share this blog post on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #FreeFriday (visibility settings on public)
  • Retweet one of the #FreeFriday tweets we send via @murfiemusic
  • Share our #FreeFriday Facebook post (in a public post)

Enough with the nitty gritty details. Now on to the free album we’re featuring!

the shins - chutes too narrowChutes too Narrow (The Shins, 2003)

Are you a lover of great indie rock? I’m talking about the fun, undeniably poppy, sing-along kind of indie rock, with just the proper amount of introspective lyrics and deep textured sounds. If that sounds right to you, then your collection will not be complete without Chutes too Narrow by The Shins.

James Mercer, lead singer and songwriter of the Shins and frontman of the newer indie rock outfit Broken Bells, is one of the best lyric writers that I’ve ever heard. His songs are saturated with imagery, and are mercilessly honest about the way people are. The songs on this album flow together quite well—the track list gives you plenty of opportunity to groove along with the hooky, melodic upbeat tunes, mixed with enough downtime during the more subtle songs. This album contains some of The Shins’ most popular and recognizable songs, but since every song is so different and unique, you’ll never get bored.

Share this post in one of the ways listed above, and I’ll let you know if you’re the winner on Monday! Best of luck!


Kayla Liederbach
@djkaylakush

Kayla manages social media and customer support at Murfie. You can hear her on the radio hosting U DUB, the reggae show, Wednesdays on WSUM. She enjoys hosting the Murfie podcast, cooking, traveling, going to concerts, and snuggling with kittycats.


Music for Spring

You can tell that spring is in the air—especially in Madison! It’s nice to wake up on a legitimately sunny day to the sound of birds chirping and —er—busses going down your street.

Spring is about all kinds of things: growth, new life, moving on, taking vacations, deep-cleaning your room, and throwing out the ol’ stack of pizza boxes. For us music lovers at Murfie, we’ve got a few album recommendations that are the soundtracks to our spring activities!


Stray Cats - Rock This Town

The Best of the Stray Cats: Rock this Town (Stray Cats)
“I have no idea why I associate this album with spring, but whenever I listen to it I recall the cool breeze of fresh air through long-closed bedroom windows and the faint smell of lilac in the air.  Maybe it’s because spring heralds the return of summer driving and there’s a lot of songs on this album about cars. My personal favorite from this album is ‘Rumble in Brighton’, which was my gateway drug into experimenting with rockabilly guitar.” – Jason

303145-largeActor-Caster (Generationals)

Actor-Caster is chock full of carefree pop songs whose jangly guitars and mellow basslines perfectly coddle the apathy that overcomes me when higher temperatures transform the indoors from the warm haven that protected me from snow to the cruel prison denying me the long-forgotten wonders of sunshine and fresh air. The first time I heard this band was at a concert a few years ago in early April, and ever since they’ve been my go-to artist for bringing in the summertime.” – Andrew

End on End - Rotes of Spring

End on End (Rites of Spring)
Emo was invented awaiting the last of the April showers and arrival of the DC cherry blossoms.”
– Jeff

 

After Hours With Miss D

After Hours With Miss D (Dinah Washington)

I usually prefer Billie Holiday, but she can be a bit heavy in the lightness of spring. For spring, I prefer someone lighter like Dinah Washington. Dinah makes me wish I had a big convertible and could drive through winding roads with the top down, sun shining and birds singing. ” – Tiffany

Brian Eno - Music for Airports

Ambient 1: Music for Airports (Brian Eno)

“Throw on Ambient 1, and relax in the fresh grass (once it thaws…). Optional: A nice glass of iced tea.”
John

 

28221-largeA Northern Soul (The Verve)

“I can’t rightly say why, but I find myself listening The Verve’s A Northern Soul with increased frequency these past few weeks. Likely, it’s the don’t-give-a-frak abandon of Nick McCabe’s guitar. Yeah, there’s the necessary pastoral work in there, too, but that’s not why you listen to The Verve. You listen to get clobbered. Perfect for crashing bikes and breaking bones which, if history is any testament, are apparently two of my favorite things to do come spring.” – Marc

Songs from the Wood

Songs from the Wood (Jethro Tull)
Definitely a great earth centered folk album! Good for listening to when sitting outside. ”
– Daniella

 

29067-largeVivaldi: Four Seasons (Raymond Leppard & English Chamber Orchestra)
“The first track is called “Spring”. Seriously who writes these questions?”
– Steve

 

 

24233-largeChutes too Narrow (The Shins)
“The earnest energy of this album is perfect for bopping around your apartment as you get all of your cleaning and spring projects done, and so wonderfully melodic that it’s hard to resist singing along :)”
– Leah

 

27004-large

Crosby, Stills & Nash (Crosby, Stills & Nash)

I find a little CSN helps when preparing the yard during spring.”
– Pete

 

105339-largeCourage to Grow (Rebelution)
Overall, Courage to Grow has really great themes: The lyrics suggest we change our social habits to be more conscious and respectful. Plus, the cool vibes from songs like ‘Feeling Alright’ make me look forward to a (hopefully) relaxing summer just around the corner. I strongly recommend this one—and it’s fun to listen to when I clean my room!” – Kayla

Tell us, what music is the soundtrack to your spring?