This Week in Music History (April 2nd-8th)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

4/2- On this day in 1977, Fleetwood Mac’s album Rumourswent to No. 1 on the US album chart. The album is the band’s most successful release, selling over 45 million copies worldwide and winning the 1978 Grammy Award for Album of the Year.

4/3- On this day in 2007, Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards denied in an interview that he had snorted his late father’s ashes while taking drugs. Richards had previously quipped about the “incident”, but his manager told MTV news that she could not believe anyone had actually taken the comment seriously.

4/4- On this day in 1964, The Beatles simultaneously held all of the top five places on the US singles chart, topped by “Can’t Buy Me Love” at No. 1. They also had another nine singles on the chart, which brought their total to fourteen singles on the Hot 100.

4/5- On this day in 1994, Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain committed suicide at his home in Seattle. His body was not found until an electrician came to his home on April 8, when a suicide note was also discovered.

4/6- On this day in 1965, Pixies singer and guitarist Frank Black/Black Francis (born Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV) was born. In addition to Pixies, Black was a member of Frank Black and the Catholics and a solo artist who released numerous solo albums.

31918-large4/7-  On this day in 1981, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band kicked off their first full-scale tour with a performance in Hamburg, Germany. The 10-country tour was Springsteen’s first outside North America.

4/8- On this day in 1964, The Supremes recorded “Where Did Our Love Go” at Motown Studios in Detroit. The track was the group’s first No. 1 hit single, although they would go on to have 12 No. 1s on the Billboard Hot 100.

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This Week in Music History (March 26th-April 1st)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

3/26- On this day in 1985, radio stations in South Africa banned all of Stevie Wonder’s songs from the airwaves after he dedicated his Oscar win the previous evening to Nelson Mandela.

3/27- On this day in 1965, “Stop! In the Name of Love” became The Supremes’ fourth US No.1 single. The song was nominated for the 1966 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Rock & Roll Group Vocal Performance.

3/28- On this day in 2005, U2 kicked off their 131-date Vertigo tour at the iPay One Center in San Diego, California. The tour grossed $389 million, the second-highest number ever for a world tour.

3/29- On this day in 1967, The Beatles began recording “With a Little Help From My Friends” at Abbey Road Studios in London. They recorded over 10 takes of the track during the first day of work.

224303-large3/30- On this day in 2013, famed US music producer and music pioneer Phil Ramone died at 79. Ramone was one of the most successful producers in music history, having won 14 Grammy Awards and worked with stars including Bob Dylan, Elton John, Paul McCartney and Ray Charles.

3/31- On this day in 1967, Jimi Hendrix set his guitar on fire onstage while appearing at the Astoria in London. Lighting guitars on fire became symbolic of Hendrix’s performances, and the Fender Stratocaster that he burned was sold for $280,000 at a 2008 London auction.

4/1- On this day in 1966, David Bowie’s first solo single, “Do Anything You Say”, was released by Pye Records. Before the single, Bowie had previously recorded as David Jones and the Lower Third.

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This Week in Music History (January 15th-21st)

What’s music history got for us this week? Learn up and boogie down!

1/15- On this day in 1961, The Supremes signed a recording contract with Motown Records. Originally known as The Primettes, the group became America’s most successful group with 12 No. 1 singles on the Billboard Hot 100.

1/16- On this day in 1996, Jamaican authorities opened fire on Jimmy Buffett’s seaplane, which they mistakenly believed belonged to a drug trafficker. Neither Buffett nor U2 frontman Bono, who was also on the plan, was injured.

1/17- On this day in 1964, The Rolling Stones released their first EP. It included “You Better Move On”, “Bye Bye Johnny”, “Poison Ivy”, and “Money”, and peaked at No. 15 on the UK chart.

1/18- On this day in 1965, The Beatles made their debut on the US charts when their single “I Want to Hold Your Hand” entered the chart at No. 45. It would go on to spend seven weeks on the chart’s top spot.

1/19- On this day in 1980, Pink Floyd’s The Wall began a 15-week run at No. 1 on the US album chart. The album, which went on to sell over 23 million copies in the US alone, is the third largest grossing album of all time in the US.

1/20- On this day in 1982, during an Ozzy Osbourne concert in Des Moines, Iowa, an audience member threw a bat onto the stage. Thinking the bat was fake, Osbourne picked it up and attempted to bite its head off. Only then did Ozzy realize that the bat was living, and he was rushed to the nearest hospital for rabies shots.

1/21- On this day in 1968, Jimi Hendrix recorded his version of Bob Dylan’s famous song “All Along the Watchtower” at Olympic Studios in London, UK. The track was released as a single in the US, peaking at No. 20.

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